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May 29, 1969 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1969-05-29

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, May 29, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thu rsdov. May 29. 1969 I, I

r:'

cinema

lectures

I

if It's Tuesday
By MARCIA ABRAMSON
Opening tonight at the Michigan is a plain o
silly movie. Sometimes funny, occasionally bor
ing, but mostly just silly. It even has a "G" rat
ing, which is something you don't see very ofte
anymore.
Everyone knows what they say about thos
whirlwind 18 - countries - in - 17 - days tourso
Europe: Don't -go. But somehow or other, peop
keep going. What do they see? Shows for th
tourists. What bargains do they pick up from th
famed European craftsmen? Made in Japan. Th
tour scene is a complete sham.
If It's Tuesday This Must Be Belgium coul
have been 'a really funny movie about Europea
tours, As it is, there are- some funny scenes as th
tourists discover-or the director (Mel Stuart
reveals to the audience-that they are bein
duped. But the movie slips into general mediocrit
because this potential is ignored in favor of stereo
typed characters and stock situations.
What we get is a collection of middle-age
couples, played by such assorted luminaries &
Peggy Cass; a "teenager;" a World War II vetera
coming back to relive the good old days., Th
middle aged couples argue a lot, which stops be
ing funny almost immediately. The teenager comn
plains about her parents and picks up whatt
apparently David Wolper's idea of a student radi
cal type, played by none other than Luke Halpin
who will probably shock most of the viewers o
this film when they remember what a cute clean
cu kid he used to be on Flipper.
Luke is now a dropout from the University o
Pennsylvania who is leader of a "movement." N

* 0 -
this must be silly
attempt is made to give him an ideology; he just
id talks about marches and arrests and "our guys."
r- Mostly he fondles the teenager and goes to coffee
t- houses where people are--gasp-passing joints.
m The best character is the mild-mannered milk-
toast of a kleptomaniac, who starts with an empty
se suitcase and smilingly steals everything he can
of get his hands on.
le Another charmer is the lecher who uses his
ze camera with finesse, specializing in under-skirt
ie and down-blouse shots. However, he is used much
ie 'too much and in too many strained situations.
The movie attempts to achieve depth through1
d the romance. The loose plot centers around Char-
n lie (newcomer Ian MacShane), another one of
ie the inevitable post-Alfie chain of Cockney Don
t) {Juans, and Miss Sam (Suzanne Pleshette), a
g tough Minneapolis career girl who knows what
y it's all about. Eventually she succumbs to Char-
- lie's charms, but the romance does not last. Miss
Sam heads back for Minneapolis, even though
d Charlie has offered his hand in marriage, because
s she knows that it won't work. Such is the "depth;"
n giving up a trite happy ending for a trite un-
te happy ending.
- The nice part of If It's Tuesday . . . is the
-, scenery, which looks really great, and the girls,
is who also look really great. Girls like Anna Maria
- Alberghetti and Claudia Cardinale were somehow
n, induced to play brief guest shots. Actors like Mar-
f tin Landau and Ben Gazzara keep turning ,up here
- and there too. Donovan shows up and sings for a
few seconds in some youthful den of iniquity. The
f title song isn't bad at all. But that's about as far
o as this one ever gets.

Behind New Africa

SPECIAL STATUS:
Yale offers places

By CAROL PINTEK
"The black man has been
colonialized bysthe American
white, and has become the
means of production for the
white economy. Since land is
essential for freedom, justice
and equality, we must get land,
we must have economic control'
of our lives."
This is the ideology behind
the efforts of therRepublic of
New Africa to form an inde-
pendent black nation from five
Southern states.
Milton Henry, vice-president of
the New Africa, summarized its
separatist position last night at
Washtenaw Community College
as a sppaker in the Black Aware-
ness Week program currently
being sponsored by the Black
Student Union.
Henry, a Yale Law School
graduate and currently a Det-
troit lawyer, has long been a
fervent advocate of black sepa-
ratism. The formation of the
RNA last year has given na-
tional recognition to his fight
for black freedom through the
creation 6f a black nation from
Louisiana,rGeorgia, Mississippi,
North Carolina and Alabama.
"America is the only country
in history that de-humanized its
slaves," said Henry. "The Amer-
ican slave was not considered
a man, but a piece of property.
The white man controlled the
black's women, his body, mind
and soul. And it's still, that way-
in the United States."
"We have come to believe that
we must separate to get any-
thing done for ourselves and
our children. Politics isn't the
way. You can't use votes to get
power; you need power to get
votes. And control of land is es-

sential to power. Land is the
basis for freedom, justice and
equality," he said.
Henry was interrupted many
times by enthusiastic applause
from the audience of blacks and
whites filling the small audi-
torium. The approval seemed to
be as much for his personal
dynamism and optimism as for
the philosophy he advocates.
Henry may well be one of the
more expressive of the black
militants prominant today.
Henry and the New Africa
group have taken their request
for the five states first to the
Johnson administration and now
to President Nixon.
"We tried to explain to Dean
Rusk about our idea of repara-
tions," said Henry. "We asked
him, how -can we have har-
mony and peace and self-trust
in this country between blacks
and whites when you've taken
everything?"
14econciliation will be possible
only when reparations are given
to the black for his labor in
building the American econo-
my, 'Henry explains.
One of the largest factors
working against black self-de-
terminism is the black's own
acceptance of a non-extreme
position, Henry believes.
"The American black is a pro-
duct of the American experience
that makes him mild and meek.
He accepts his children going
hungry in a country with vast
resources for food production.
He continues eating crumbs even
while he watches the white eat-
ing more and more," Henry said.
h\

"I see black people every day
willing to sit down and work
with the craft unions that keep
blackteenagers from learning
the skills that build our build-
ings. I
"The United States is the
greatest education capital in the
world. Yet we have non-whites
who are not taught how to look
at beauty, to enjoy music- and
art and ideas--when they're able
to get away from the mill long
enough."
Even though the RNA is con-
sidered extremist enough to be
investigated by the McClellan
Internal Affairs Committee, no
black in America today can be
called an extremist, Henry ex-
plains.
"Any blacks who daily puts
up with the treatment he gets
in this white nation is no extre-
mist. When my black brothers
motivate themselves to build
their own country, to control
their own economy, as some of
the African nations are doing,
may they be called 'extremist,'"
he said.
"I want my people to be out
of bondage," Henry concluded.
"The integrationist will work
against the freedom of the black
man in this nation. We've sug-
gested a proper settlement. Out
of 50 states in the union, we get
five, you get 45. If you don't
think that's fair, then turn it
around!"
Charles Thomas, former chair-
man of the Afro-American Lib-
eration in Aran Arbor, also prof-
fered ideas on the black ideolo-
gy in the black struggle.

L( IU s e
NEW HAVEN, Conn. OP-Seven
of the 12 students sent un-
authorizedvletters of admission to
Yale University's "School of. Art
and Architecture have been of-
ficially offered admission as "spe-
cial students."
Dean Howrad S. Weaver of the
Art and Architecture School said
last night that the "special" status
in no way reflected on the can-!
didates' qualifications, but that "it
simply means that we cannot now
promise to offer a degree admin-
istered by an adequate Depart-
ment of City Planning."
The seven applicants, the dean
said, have the prerequisites that
would qualify them as potential
candidates for admission to other
degree programs,
Earlier yesterday a Yale spo-
kesman had said the 12 students
would "definitely not be enrolled."
This statement followed one in
which a Yale spokesman had said
all 12 would be admitted.
The spokesman said confusion
among Yale officials resulted in
the report Tuesday that the 12
would be admitted-despite the
fact that three faculty members
were being disciplined '4or theirI
part in the affair.
Eight other students had been
accepted by Yale in April. The
City Planning Forum, an advisory
group of students and faculty
within the Department of City
Planning, recommended 12 more
students at the same time, but
.1--- -~ - | - 1

d entrants
said they were rebuffed in efforts
to discuss the situation with How-
ard Weaver, dean of the School of
Art and Architecture,
Weaver said he was scheduled
to meet with representatives of
the committee last Friday, but the
group sent out the unauthorized
admission letters a few hours be-
fore that meeting was to be held.
On Tuesday, Yale President
Kingman Brewster Jr. sent a let-
ter to the eight students who had
been admitted earlier, advising
them not to enroll at Yale because
the university could not guarantee
that the degree in city planning
would be awarded in future.
Other Yale officials thought
Brewster's letter had also gone
out to the 12 who had received the
unauthorized admission letters
from the faculty-student commit-
tee. Those 12 had been sent, in-
stead, a telegram from Dean
Weaver saying Yale would not ad-
mit them, a Yale spokesman said
yesterday.

DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN
-v:..-..,
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ft^ ftf"M~% Raft

The laily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
- sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
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Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Thursday, May 29
Day Calendar
No'Events Scheduled
GENERAL NOTICES
Summer Piano Series Ushers: Persons
who may be interested in signing up
to usher for the series of piano con-
certs to be given during the month of
July in Rackham Auditorium, may sign
up at the Box Office of Hill Auditor-
ium on Thursday, June 5th from '7 PM
to 8 PM. The dates of the Concerts and
the artists to be presented will be,
available when you come to sign up.
Please see Mr. Warner.
Mental Health Re earch Institute
-Symposium in Association with a Meet-
ing of The American Society of Neuro-
chemistry. Current Trends in Neuro-
clhemistry-Tiuwsday, June 3, g AM-3
PM, Room 1057 MHRI. For information,
call Mrs. Gilbert, 764-4212.
Doctoral Exams
Douglas Duane Spencer, Education,
Dissertation: "The Career and Profes-
sional Orientations of Non-Doctorate
Faculty Members in State Colleges," on
Thursday, May '29 at 0:00 AM in
West Council Room, Rackham Building,
Chairman: J. L Doi.
Amran Haim, Linguistics, Disserta-
tion: "Intonatior in Relation to Syn-
taxy inBahasa Indonesia," on Thursday,
May 29 at 1:00 PM in 21,6 Gunn' Build-,
ing, Chairman:. C. Catford.
Medhat Ahmed Helmy Ibrahim, Elec-
trical Engineering, Dissertation: "Coup-
ling Analysis of a Loaded and Unloaded
Pair of Rectuanguiar Waveguide Cavi-
ties Opening in an Infinitely Conduct-
ing around Plane," on Thursday,; May
29 at 1:00 PM in 4514 East Engineering,
Chairman: J. A. M.: Lyon.
Edward Robert Lowenstein,. Sociaf
Work and Sociology, Dissertation: "The
Attachment of East Pakistan Rural Mi-

grants to Factory Worker or Cultivator
Roles," on Thursady, May 29 at 1:30
P.M. in 3028 L.S.&A. Building, Chair-
man: Howard Schuman.
Placement
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Application Forms for Next Federal
Service Entrance examination are avail-
able at Placement Services, these are
due June 11, test given July 19.
Students Who Took The FSEE Pre-
viously, and have received notification
of Managenment Intern Status on their
scores, will be interviewed June 23 and
24 at Placement Services.
Several Announcements Dealing With
opportunities fpr further study, finan-
cial aid, etc., are available at Career
Planning Division, ask for the follow-
Ing there, or call 764-6338.,
University of Wisconsin, Madison,
Wis., offers programs, for PhD, Pro'
fessional Masters, and teaching and re-
search assistantships in areas of, coun-
selor education for vocational adjust-
ment of disabled and disadvantaged.
Support, stipends and good job oppor-
tunkties.
May Issue of Rhodes Report lists na-
tionwide fall openings for teaching,
admin, and supv. positions. Areas in-
clude radio, guidance, librarym spec. ed,
therapists, audio-visual, administ., cur-
ric. coord. student personnel, and
learning research."

General Division has received the fol-
lowing request: If the employer re-
ceives considerable interest from Michi-
gan he will consider coming out to in-
terview several candidates. Please con-
tact Mr. Raymond Quinn as soon as
possible: Management Trainee in Mer-
chandising, any liberal arts degree, or
specialities in retaining, merchandising,
or marketing, experience not neces-
sary, will be managng shops after train-
ing, period of 3 mo-1 year, dep. on
position to assume, and background of
candidate. Contact Rr. Raymond
Quinn, 20 W. 38th Street, New York,
N.Y. 10018.
Placement Services-Education Divis-
ion-The following teaching vacancies
have been reported by a school in the
Ann Arbor area: Physics/Chemistry or
Physics/Math, Drafting (can be part-
time), Cross-country/Track Coach/So-
cial Studies (the coaching is required
with.this position) man, Instrunental/
Vocal Music, man. For additional infor-
mation contact Mrs. Flynn, 3200 SAB,
764-7462. '
Friday & Saturday
DUCK
SOUP
dir. Leo McCarey (1933)
THE MARX BROTHERS
"THEIR BEST"
Miss Dumont:
"Sir, I welcome you with open
arms.
Groucho (leering) : "How late
do you stay open?"
7 & 9 Architecture
662-8871 Auditorium

3
r
4

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
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Michigan. News phone: 764-05b2. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
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Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day thropgh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail. b

n gw ., ..a.a. Fu
RomaticYarbrough

BACH CLUB
presents a talk by
RANDOLPH SMITH
on
Bach's Sonata i in G
for Viola Da Gamba
and Clavier
plus an
Election of Officers
THURSDAY, MAY 29
Guild House-802 Mnroe
Jelly donuts and Fun!! Attendance
at last meeting was' 60! Everyone
Welcome! No musicol knowledge
needed (even for officers). For
further information Call 761-
8291, 769-2922, 769-1605.

I
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761-0001
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# One a large one item (or more)
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Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $2.50 by carrier', $3.00 by
mail.
The Famous
CHARGING
RHINOCEROS
DANCE-CONCERT
Sunday, June 1
9 P.1M.$10
kA

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7O APLEN THEATRC-1
375 No. MAPLE RD. '769-130

ENDS TUESDAY
MON.-THUR.-7:00-9:35
FR.-$AT.-SUN.---1:00-
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Glenn Yarbrough. The Voice of Our Time,
Both Hopeful and Loving. His New
Album: $4:98, Double Occupancy.
f-
on;AJ Warer &vs.- 7Arts Records & Tapes
SEPTEMBER 16-28
'.i.SAROYAN'S

MGM Presents a STANLEY KUBRICK PRODUCTION
2001
a space odyssey
SUPER PANAVisibN@) 0 METROCOLOR

4vi

JUMBOV

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M-M-M-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger' of / lb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, anions,
pickles and ketchup..
ALL THIS FOR ONLY
49c±
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West of Arborlond

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of'4
Ano';er delightful APA revival of an American elassi ,!

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THIS PICTURE HAS A MESSAGE:
"Watch out!" 1 ,

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Europe sent us Dutch Elm Disease,
German Measles and Russian Roulette.
We sent them World-Wind :}
Vacation Tour 125' '

"A

SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 12
Ghelderode's
4 %,g of satanical sulphur"
by the author of the APA hit "Pantaglelze"-

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Directed by John Houseman

Gogobl's
iH~JI1J
* ~I * RIU RM

Drected by
Stephen Porter

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A satirical farce on thg bumblings of bureaucracy!

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starring
SUZANNE PLESHETTE
" IAN McSHANE

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PTP SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE OPEN
10 AM-i P.M., 2-5 P.M.,
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