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May 18, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, Mov 18, 1968

" s.--T4 M CH GAID IL

VSotfI daVoli' ov .,'1;d i".1; 6R{5

1
M

cinema:

'Fixer
By T. EDWARD HEARNE
Collegiate PressService
Second of a two parts
BUDAPEST, Hungary - The
m~ost important decisions in
film-making depend on two or
three personalities: chiefly the
director and scriptwriter, and
one or two principle actors..'
These are the architects of the
filmn business.
On a typical day of shooting
at M-G-M's -The Fixer produc-
tion, you will find John Fran-
kenheimer sitting in his leather
director's chair. He will seem
to have little connection with
the frantic activity going on
around him, although a con-
stant stream of his staff come
to him for decisions about a'
particular camera angle or
which objective to use for a
particular shot.
"The biggest problems con-
nected with this film were in
the casting," he said. "Once I
had the right actors, the rest is
simply getting them to do the

dynamic duo

Senate to take action
on appropriations billl

part the way I want them to,
which isn't at all hard if
they're the right people in the
first place."
The screenwriter D a 1 t o n
Trumbo is in this picture the
other important architect. He
is faced not only with transfer-
inV Bernard Malamud's novel
into a different medium but
also with the day-to-day revi-
sions on the set, changing, pol-
ishing and enlarging the script
as the filming proceeds.
Trumbo is one of Hollywood's
most prolific writers, although
many of his achievements he
doesn't talk about since they
were written under pseudonyms
during the bleak years of his
ostracism. Trumbo was one of
the "unfriendly ten," the group
of Hollywood writers blacklisted
in 1947 after their appearan'ce
before the witch hunters of the
House UnAmerican Activities
Committee.
After a short jail sentence
for refusing to cooperate with

HUAC, Trumbo found that he
could only practice his art un-
dercover and for a fraction of
his former salary. "I can never
answer when people ask me how
many Oscars I've won," he
laughed. But it is common
knowledge that several anony-
mous scriptwriters who have not
appeared to collect their'awards
are really Dalton Trumbo.
For Trumbo the major prob-
lems is writing The Fixer script
came from changing a fictional,
work to a film medium. "When
you put something on film, it's
five times more vivid than if
you read it on a page of print.
Now, Yakov Bok, the lead
character, is in prison for two
years and suffers many priva-
tions. If we had duplicated
Yakov's physical misery at Ma-
lamud described it, the film
would have been unbearable.
Yakov's spiritual life is not at
all dull, but this has to be put
in visual terms."
And how does Trumbo think
the film will stack up against
the bestselling novel? "The ob-
ject of a screenwriter is not to
be as good as the novel, but to
be better than the novel. If you
can't improve on your source
there's no point in doing it.
Malamud improved on the
Mendel Beiliss case, which in
one way or another is the orig-
inal source of the story, and I
think I've improved on Mala-
mud. Whether I've been suc-
cessful, of course, isn't really
for me to say. It's a combina-
tion of skill and a little luck."

(Continued from Page 1)
ing which the legal staff re-
examine each bill for technical
errors.
Of the $2.3 million difference
between the Senate and House
proposals for the University ap-
propriation, $1.8 is seemingly ac-.
counted for by a wide differential
in, estimates of funds the Uni-
versity will gain through student
fees and "other income," in the
coming fiscal year.
The House bill lists $26 million
in this category, while the Senate
bill lists $27.8 million.
House reaction
warns students
LANSING ()-Sixty legislators
plan to serve notice on the offi-
cers of Michigan's state-supported
schools that they must control
unruly students or face budget
jcuts.
Rep. Stanley Davis (D-Grand
Rapids) yesterday introduced in
the House a resolution carrying
that message and signed by 32
Republicans and 28 Democrats.
The resolution calls on college
officials to "maintain order and
discipline" and expel students
who seize control of school build-
ings, and warns that the Legis-
lature "will hereafter look with
favor" on the idea of reducing
the appropriations of schools
where disorderly demonstrations
occur.

In Ann Arbor, University Presi-
dent Robben Fleming explained
the $1.8 million gap is an error
in calculation made by the Sen-
ate when it assumed all out-of-
state tuition is $1300 per aca-
demic year. Graduate students
pay more than $1300.
Other differences include $120,-
000 for interns and residents at
the Medical School and $125,000
for "equipment and maintenance"
of the Flint campus, both of
which are mentioned only in the
House bill.
VanderLaan also said the limi-
tations placed on the numbers of
out-of-state students at state
schools "does not have a chance
of changing."
The reason for adopting these
stipulations in the bill, Vander-
Laan explained, was "the high
ratio of out-of-state students in
Michigan universities compared.,to
the national average, and the
feeling Michigan was educating
non-residents at the expense of
Michigan taxpayers."
Senate Minority Floor eLader
Coleman A. Young (D-Detroit)
said he would "definitely support"
maintainance of the House's pro-
posed increase in the appropria-
tion bill.
In addition, Young said he will
continue to oppose the limitation
on out-of-state students.

Board takes
no actionon
'U'Council
(Continued from Page 1)
that this section of Steude's by-
law draft and a section that would
override the veto power of SGC
and Facutly Senate are unaccept-
able.
Fleming said that the section
that would override the veto
power of SGC and Faculty Senate
are unacceptable.
Fleming said that the section
that would override the veto power
is necessary to avoid the possibili-
ty of a stalemate in rule legisla-
tion. He said that such a provi-
sion is necessary although "all of
us agree that the rules of UC
will be happiest for all of us
concerned if they are rules we
have all agreed upon."
The Regents approved the ap-
pointments of two new associate
deans of the literary college. They
are Hayden K. Carruth, who has
been assistant dean since 1961,
and Alfred S. Sussman, chairman
of the botany deparment since
1963.
The Regents also appointed Roy
F. Proffitt and Joseph R. Julin
associate deans of the law school;
John A. GronvallRobert A. Green
and George R. DeMuth as asso-
ciate deans of the medical
school; and named Prof. iRobert.
C. Metcalf chairman of the ar-
chitecture department.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
5 ?:::v n-.R %'ah'\ \:r . .r ... >.h4. :. '}h! t,{"a.' W ...

-Associated Press
Holy fire
The Rev. Philip F. Berrigan and his brother, Father Daniel
Berrigan 4right) stand over the burning Selective Service rec-
ords they stole from a Baltimore draft office yesterday. Nine
persons were arrested after the brothers Berrigan raided the
office, carried the records outside and set them afire. This was
the second draft board raid that Rev. Barrigan has pulled in
the last three months.
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION .
FOX EASTERN THEATRES NOW T H R U TUESDAY
FOX VILLarGE FRI-MON.-TUES BRAIN 9:30
375 No. MAPLE RD.*769-1300 BEACH 7:40
SAT. __ BRAIN 5:20-9:10 SUN. BRAIN 1:30-5:20-9:10
BEACH 3 30~7:20 BEACH 3:30-7:20

1*

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times ,on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student . organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270
SATURDAY, MAY 18
Day Calendar
Delta Kappa Gamma International
Society 1968 Alpha Iota State Conven-
tion-Morning Session, Lecture Hall,
Rackham Building, 8:00 a.m.
Institute of Continuing Legal Educa-
tion-"Employees in the Public Sector"
-?04orning Session, Auditorium A, An-
gell Hall. 9:00 a.m.
Baseball-U-M vs. University of Il-
linois: Ferry Field, 1:00 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Casablanca. Architec-
ture Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
SUNDAY, MAY 19
Delta Kappa Gamma International
Society 1968 Alpha Iota State Conven-
tion-Morning Session, Michigan Un-
11, 8.00 a.m.
MONDAY, MAY 20
Computer Systems Planning and
Management - Registration, Lobby,
Chrysler Center, 8:00 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inat -"The Management of Managers
No. 59": North Campus,. Commons.
$:1$ aan. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00
p.M.
Basic Firemanship Training Course
II-Registration, Civil Defense Center,
8:.30 a.m.
Botany Seminar: Dr. John Ratten-
bury, University of Auckland, 'New
Zealand, "Evolution of New Zealand
Flora," Botanical Gardens, 4:15 p.m.
General Notices
TV Center programs: On Sunday,
May 19 the following programs produced
by the TV Center will have their ini-
tial telecast in Detroitt
100 a.m., WJBK TV, Channel 2 --
l ngng Together: "Songs for All Oc-I
cesions." The John Allen Elementary
School Choir sings songs for special
holidays,
12:00 Noon, WWJ-TV, Channel 4 -
After Eden: "The Garden Divided."
Prof. Clark Hopkins discussed Alex-
ander the Great's march to empire.
Colloquium in Education-Dr. Robert
Rosenthal, Psychologist, Harvard Uni-
versity, co-author with Lenore Jacob-
son of Pygmalion in the Classroom:
Teacher Expectations and Pupil Per-
formance, will speak on "Ethics of
Deception in Research" and "Teach-
r' ,Expectations: Determinants of Pu-
pils' IQ ,Gais" may 22, 4200 UHS, 4-6
The University of Michigan presents
the first annual Arthur H. Vanden-
berg Lecture, on May 22, at. 8:00 p.m.,
in the Rackham Amphitheater. The
lecturer will be Mr. James B. Reston,
Executive Editor of The New York
Times, who will speak on "The Van-
dpnberg Tradition?' This lecture is
open to the public witout charge.
Regents' Meeting: Friday, June 21,
Communications for consideration at
this meeting must be in the Presi-
dent's hands no later than Thursday,
June 6.
sccs
The approval of the following stu-
dent sponsored events becomes effec-
tive after the publication of this notice.
All publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has be-
come effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in rooms
1001 and 1546 of the Student Activities
Buijding.
Students for Citizens for New Poli.
tics-Diag Rally-May 17, 1968-Noon-
Diag.
Stockwell Hall Council-Mixer-May
24, 1968-8:30 p.m.-Stockwell Cafeter-

Doctoral
Exammatio s
Doctoral Examination for: Edvard
Eilhardt Mayer, Slavic Languages and
Literatures, Dissertation: "Leonid's Le-
onov's Art of Dramatization," on Mon-
day, May 20 at 2 p.m. in West Council
Room, Rackham, Chairman: A. K. Hu-
mesky.'
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION
Interview Announcement: Wednesday,
May 22:
Navy Employment Office, Great Lakes,
Ill. (35 min. from the Loop) is seeking
any degree graduates, August and De-
cember, for positions in the areas of
personnel, computer work, manage-
ment and budget analysis, bus ad., and
any engineering fields. Appointments
are at levels GS-5 and 7. Federal Serv-
ice Entrance Exam. required and can
be given at the interview, Wednesday,
May 22. Scoring will be done on the
spot. Please call 764-7460 if interested
in~ these. and arrange for the interview.
Current Position Openings Received
by General Division by mail and phone
-please call 764-7460 for further infor-
mation:
jFairlawn Haven Nursing Home &
Home for the Aged, Archbold, Ohio-
Assistant Administrator to serve as
Executive Director after 1 yr. Seek
man with admin. training.
George Ash Packing Company, Chi-
cago, Ill.-Assistan't to the Owner and
Operator, deg. in bus. ad., new grad in
upper third of class, variety of manage-
ment and analysis activities, oppor.
for advancement.
Federal Water Pollution Control Ad-
min., Lake Erie Office, Cleveland, O.-
Engineers, Chemists to work in com-
bating spread of water pollution in
Lake Erie.
Local Furniture Store, Ann Arbor,
Mich.-Interior Decorator or Salesper-
son, M. or F, for full-time furniture
sales, selling or decorating exper.
Nashua Corp., Nashua, New Hamp-
shire-Omaha, Neb. plant, Personnel
Specialist, B.A. in Bus. Ad., maj. in
Indus. Rels., admin. of corp. person-
nel policies at the div. level, recruit-
ment, employee rels. for 290 employees.
Local Organization, Ann Arbor,
Mich.-Conference Coordinator, F,in
middle thirties, BA. personable, sophis-
ticated, broadly educated.
Local Organization, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Mch-Electronics Technician, under-
standing of power supplies, low volt-
age digital devices. Short-term or part-
time pos.
Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., Chi-,
cago, Ill., Claims Representatives, lib.
arts or bus, ad. deg., 0-6 yrs. exper.,
10 wk. trng. prog., assign to midwest
office, car furn.
ORGAN I ZATION
NO"TIC ES

A SECOND TO DIE"...
aS all McCord gives them!

-.
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
MONDAY,, MAY 20th
noon luncheon 25c
BOB OLSON:
"Con we survive the effects of science"

I

TONIGHT at

BOB

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

oil-time favorite return
houses on the East coa
lads, fun songs, and
playing guitar, banjo,
$1.00 Cover inc

IlTE
s from his tour of coffee
st to sing traditional bal-
popular folk music -
and AUTOHARP.
ludes FREE FOOD

10

TODAY

I

Rally

NOON

"ally

ULLiVuI itI
PIG R1 6
to die!H
COD KERDY AIMI6IVEUiRYAN SEL?@LAN BID AUD iih
1811M I PICIOAE8 COOP MfODIICIN EAUrMACW.ORs"

i

* STARTS WEDNESDAY*

BILL AYERS
for School Board
Bucket Drive All Day

lMA

TECHNICOLOR5 A PARAMOUNT PIPTURE,
2ND FEATURE,=---

4 '

r.
::

i~
: A ,o

Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7,
'& 9:05

JCHARLES K. FELDMA #rase.
6 JOSEPH L. MANKIEWICZ'
Fo merly THE HI-OEtY POT }SS

a-QG .,

Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially
recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are
available in room 1011 SAB. '

Student Friends of CNP
- -5..

-

HELD OVER

"IT SHOULD BE SEEN"

r

-Okrent, Daily

Libertarian League, May 19, 2:00 p.m.,
2X (MIMES) Union, discussion of
spring-summer agenda.

I

BESTACTOR, ROD STEIGER g
IHEMRIS SIDNEY POITIER ROD STEIGER
IHE NORMAN JEWISON WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
INL7 K EAT OF TW rIGHT'
COLOR by Deluxe 5IS;;J United Artists

I

DIAL
8-6416

Continuous
Sot. & Sun.
from 1 P.M.

r

DIAL NO 2-6264

TONIGHT at
RODGERS' & HAMMERSTEIN'S
OKLAHOMA
"Oscar Hammerstein & I owe our
professional lives to it" - R.
Rodaers

Bette Davis
adds another
portrait in
evil as
the most
merciless
mother of
them all

1

( y /
K /

I

I

I

[IN vkvl .-11*

;' ;r

I

f I N MYlllI mi , u 111 - AID f'"'""-w u.'"uM u .

I

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