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May 15, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-05-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAUY

Wednesdav. Mov 1 . 1 968.''

t r II" g e t w o T H E M I C H I G A N D A I L

CWlldIn JlIr /v Mm, 1 -/ ,1 VV

A day with Humphrey
on the Detroit swing. j"t

Government reports threefold
improvement in U.S. dollar drain

(Continued from Page 1)
no more " Once the candi-
date is oil the dignitary-stud-
ded platform, again smiling
and waving, "Oh say, can you
see" replaces the spirituals.
A quick glance around the
audience, all black save for
members of thl'ie .,press and
Humphrey's clutch of secret
service men and staff mem-
hers, shows a Sunday in mid-
week. The women are wearing
nicely flowered hats, the men
are in Well-pressed suits,
Church attendance pins - and,
just as often, Democratic Par-
ty pins -. dot their lapels. The
incredible exuberance of the
candidate's face is reflected off
of thse in his audience. They
know this rman in front of the
room; you can be sure of that.
Humphrey sits down. Far to
his left, near the end of the
f - platform, sits the only other
white man up there, G. Me #-
nen Williams - "governor, am-
bassador, diplomat and states-
man," Humphrey will- call him
later' Between the two white
men, and stretched far to
Humphrey's left, sit congress-
my.y1en., stat senators 'aind rep-
°° resentatives, p a r t y :-officials,
church leaders, all b ack. Each
man stands and nods to &n
approving audience when the
speaker introduces him.
But after the speaker is
through, and after he has pat-
ronized each of the dignitaries
with an introduction, he warms
up in pure preacher style for.
'controvers
(Continued from Page 1)
bers say were agreed upon. He
was asked that the drafting not
be done by him alone, and in in-
terpreting this request he con-
sulted with two faculty members
and two students of his own se-
lection.
When SGC and the Commission
became aware that the final draft
of a bylaw' establishing Univer-
sity Council had been prepared,'
many expressed immediate con-
cern that they had not been
aware of the drafting and its pro-
cedures. After they read the draft,,
reactions ranged from .being "a
little troubled" to, shocked indig-
nation at the proposal.
The consensus of those disturb-
ed by the proposed bylaw is that
more time is necessary. Although
the Regents chargd Cutler with
preparing the bylaw by their
regular ,May meeting on Friday,
mot bsevers feel that the Re-
gents should delay action on the
proposal until all complaints have
been thoroughly considered and
discussed
Yesterday Cutler agreed not to
recommend passage of the pro-
posal-to the Regenfts. But the, final
decisipn rests with them. If they
decid to pass it without Cutler's
recommendation, the University
might face the possibility of an-
other series of student teach-ins,
sitins a'nd ultimatums, and per-
haps even . another Presidential
Commission. "

the big one: "Since this is a
non-political gathering," the,
Rt. Rev. Alfred G. Dunston in-
tones, "I take the honor of pre-
senting to you Hubert Horatio
Humphrey, the next president
of the United States." After
the friendly laughs comes the
friendlier applause.
The- voice is sharp, in the
charateristic Humphrey fash--
ion, yet it is casual. It first is
used to set the audience at ease.
The warm-up lines reflect a
keen wit, and a feel for the
audience. But once the man
gets into his .text, he show
that he can read an audience
for more than just laughs;
when he'is serious, he invokes
the past that he will have to
rely on if he is to win the Ne-
gro vote.
"Let me say I am proud to
be the original Senate sponsor
of the African Museum of
Washington,D.C.," he lets him-
self say.
"I am proud to say, I stood
up (at the 1948 Democratic
Convention) and called upon
my Party to get out of the sha-
dow of states' rights and walk
forthrightly into -the bright
sunshine of human rights"," he
is proud to say.nh
His eyes show determination
and fire, his voice is molded
and modulatd to fit the mood.
He does not stand still. His
arms are gesticulating passion-
ately, his shoulders are now
forthrightly pinned back, now
possessively leaning forward.
He quotes freely fromn Frank-
lin Roosevelt and Martin Lu-
ther King and Alben Barkley,
then from Christ Himself. He
recalls his humble roots ("I
was counting pills in my dad-
dy's drug store before I was
counting votes"'). He tells the
crowd that "We. shall over-
come."
The response befits the sur-
roundings. In addition to the
applause, Humphrey's speech is
punctuated by a muffled chor-
us of "Say on," and "That's
right," and "A-men." None of
these ejaculations come with
exclamation .points; rather,
they come as reflex. The
audience' + remembers Hubert
Humphrey, and they like what
they remember and what he is
now reminding them of.
Now the speech is over, and
Humphrey sits by as a church
official delivers a sermon of
brotherhood. Now he gets up
to leave, and 'walks off the
platform followed by his aides
and his protect6rs. Now he
steps into the street, where po-
lice barricades mark off a line
of men and women and chil-
dren waiting to shake his hand.
In the forefront of the
crowds behind the barricades,
a group of little children
prance to the beat of the ex-
citement. They crane their
necks and reach out their
hands as the man in the dark
blue suit and full-faced smile
moves up and down the line of
the crowd.' Later, they'll go
'home to, 'dirty flats too small
for families of seven and eight,
and ask their daddies who this
man with the smile was.,

,WASHINGTON (P)-The gov-
ernment reported yesterday a
threefold improvement in the U.S
dollar drain during the first quar-
ter of this year. But the outflow
still far exceeds the long-range
hopes of the Johnson administra-
tion.
, The Commerce Department said

- results highlight the importance of the first quarter and imports $7.83
higher taxes, restoration of wage- billion.
. price stability, a no strike pledge The department said the strikes
in industries which affect imports and the threat of a steel strike re-
and exports, enactment of the tarded exports and contributed to
new export expansion program, rising imports.
and removal of barriers to U.S. "These developments may have
'trade. reduced the trade balance $450
1 "It is clear that the real heart million to $500 million," the de-

the balance of payments deficit of the problem is the restoration
totaled about $600 million during of a healthy trade surplus" Fowler
the January-March period, the said.

-Daily-Andy Sacks
Humphrey in Detroit
REAGAN SURPRISE:
Kenndy nwin decisive,

(Continued from Page 1)
lican nominating convention votes,
there was no clear trend in' the
Democratic balloting; to fill out
that party's 30 vote delegation.
Former Gov.:George Wallace of
Alabama received one per cent of
the Democratic vote and about
the same amount from the Re-
publicans. On his American Inde-
pendent Party ticket, he had re-
ceived only 358 votes.
Kennedy renewed in a victory
statement his invitation for Mc-
Carthy to join'him in working
together to change the course 'of
the Demo ratic party. Both have
been critical of Johnson's Viet-
nam war course and of many of
his domestic policies.
Humphrey, who is seeking dele-
gate support without entering
the primaries, was the only visible
target for such an alliance.
But McCarthy would have none
of it. He said he is going it alone
into what he regards as the vital
primaries in Oregon and Cal-
ifornia.
McCarthy said that Nebraska
has provided him with a better
showing than in last week's In-
diana primary when he got 27
per cent of the Democratic vote
in a three way race in which pov.
Roger D. Branigin, running as a
favorite son leaning toward
Humphrey, placed second to
Kennedy,
The Minnesota senator said he
was satisfied with about 30 per
cent of the Nebraska vote. ,He
said his showing will be better in
Oregon, where he is about even
with Kennedy now. He said Cal-
ifornia offers him his best chance
of winning.
Nixon, after hearing he had 70
per cent of the Republican. presi-
dential vote in Nebraska, said
that, "It is better than we ex-
pected-but we expected to do
well."
In West Virginia, contests for
the Democratic and Republican
nominations for governor settled
down into neck-and-neck two
man races in both cases in re-
turns late last night' from the
primary election.
With returns in from 25 per,
cent of the 2,509 polling places, no
clear trend had been set in either

the Democratic struggle between'
James W. Sprouse and C. Donald
Robertson or the Republican race
between Rep. Arch A. Moore Jr.
and former Gov. Cecil H. Under-
wood.
Sprouse, the state party chair-
man, and Robertson, two-term at-
torney general, quickly outdis-
tanced three other Democratic
candidates. But as the slow count

of the extraordinarily long bal-
lot dragged through the evening,
the lead see - sawed between
Sprouse and Robertson, changing
with almost ever new tabulation.
John D. "Jay" Rockefeller NV,
nephew of the Republican gover-
nors of New York and Arkansas,
appeared headed for a decisive
victory for the Democratic nom-
ination for secretary of the state.

t DAILY OFFICIAL'B
r';". B.
A;;{;:;::}:jL:::}::?:"'{rS 'r~:{::S ::;" "$'.;. + .Y .r. .1{ {""."r::.,;:{{i;}"?:.V .h.'i

lowest in three quarters despite
rising imports. This figures out to
an annual rate of $2.4 billion.
The department indicated the1
first quarter deficit would havel
been as low as $100 million had
it not been for strikes in the cop-
per industry and the New York'
port and increased imports ofj
steel as a hedge against a possible
steel strike later this year.
Secretary of the Treasury Henry
H. Fowler said the first quarterj
deficit proves the need for early9
enactment of the 10 per cent taxI
surcharge and related spendingc
cuts as "the key to the solution,
of our balance of payments de-
Ii'icit."
He said if the United States had
maintained, a trade surplus com-
parable to that of the 'last three
years the first quarter balance of
payments would have been in sur-
plus rather than deficit.
Fowler said the first quarter
U LLETIN
yrs. exper. in product dev. Process En- ,
gineer. ChE plus 3-5 yrs. in Chem.
Process engrg. with packaging. Ceram-
aciat chemist. 3-5 yrs. In 'solid state
reactiorC powder materials. Packaging!
Engineer, 1-3 yrs, in this fld., BS in
Pack. Engr. or ME.
Bedford Public Schools, Temperance
Mich.,-'Director of Business Services,
MBA pref. and min. 3 yrs. in another
school syst.
Automatic Electric Company, North-
lake, Ill. -' Programmer. Fortran 'ex-
per.. IBM 360. BS/MS, Technical writ
er. BS/BS plus some tech. bckrnd. Ac-
countant, BBA, Acctg. Process Engi-
neers, BSME, EE, IE. Process ChE.
Staff ~Operating Engrs., BSEE plus
exper.,r in telephony. Planning Engi-
neer, BS/MS EE. Sales Analysis. BS
Mktg. plus 6 mo. mktg. exper.
Cole National Corporation, Cleveland,
Ohio - Director of Advertising and
Market Research, 'MBA in early 30s,
product or brand mgmt. exper., some
food co sumer industry is likely
bckrnd.

The first quarter deficit com-
pared with a $3.57-billion deficit
in 1967 which included the $1.85
billion last quarter drain that fol-
lowed devaluation of the British
pound.
The country runs a deficit when
It spends more money abroad than
foreign countries spend here. ItI
has done this in 17 of the last 18
years.
The most striking aspect of the
first quarter was the deterioration
in the U.S. trade picture, usually a
bright spot in the nation's balance
of payments.
The department said merchan-
dise exports increased about $460
million during the quarter but im-
ports were up by $680 million.
Exports totaled $7.93 billion in

partment said.
On New Year's Day, President
Johnson outlined a balance of
payments program designed to cut
$3 billion from last year's deficit.
It envisions a $500-million im-
provement in the trade surplus.
Some other parts of the admin-
istration program were more suc-
cessful, however, the department
added.
It said U.S. banks reported a
net inflow of $360 million through
reducing foreign assets held by
themselves and their domestic
customers. This helped the U.S.
position.
At the same time, the depart-
ment said sales of securities to
foreigners totaled $675 million
and included $560 million in bonds
sold in other countries by U.S.
firms to finance foreign invest-
ments.

0'

Dial NO 2-6264

~TATE
4F(

FRANSCOPE ,"r+f r4=ROCOLOR
Last CoMplete Shaw--7;45

*.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily 'assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of, the day preceding
publication,,and' by 2 p.m. Friday
raturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mumof two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices, are
Fnot accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
Day Calendar
The Initial Management of the
Acutely Ill or Injured Patient -; Reg-
istration, Lobby, Rackham Bldg.,, 8:15
a.m.
Elements of Outdoor Recreation Plan-
ning-Morning Session, Field Trip,
8:30 a.m.
Tuition Refunds honored through
3 p.m.
:":: ":r:t{{ :: ::. S i..:":} ti 4
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of this column for announce-
Fments> is available to officially
Srecognizedand registered student
organizations only. Forms are
available in room 1011 SAB.
Bach Club meeting, Thurs, May 16,
8:08 p.m., Guild House,, 802 Monroe.
Program: 1) election of officers for
spring and summer; 2) Bach's D Minor
Triple Harpicord Concerto. For fur-
ther information call 769-2750 c r
769-2922.
** *
Christian Science Organization Tes-
timony Meeting Thurs., May 16, 7:30
p.m., .Room 3545 SAB.

Doctoral
Examinations
Gerald Cecil Bailey, .Psychology, Dis-
sertation: "A Study of the Effect of
Staff/Line Role and Organizational
Climate Upon Task Estimates," on
Wed., May 22 at 10 a.m. in Rm. 5110
ISR..C hairman: S. E. Seashore
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIvISION
Current Positions received by Gen-
eral Division, call 764-7460 for further
information.
Weyerhaeuser Company, Tacoma,
Wash. - Production Engineering Con-
sultant, in Cleveland, Ohio. Engrg de-
gree plus 2 years exper. in home man-
ufacturing and building. .
Derr Manufacturing -Company, De-
troit, Mich. - Project Engineer, 1-3

'T M TARTS
TOMOR ROW !

a
r

- MICHIGAN

--.

PAUL,
N EWMA N
in
"Cool Hand Luke"
at 1 :20-5:30-9:30

2 ACADEMY
AWARD NOMINEES
AU DREY
HEPBURN
in
"Wait Until Dark"
at 3:30 & 7:40 only

FRIDAY:

"A Minute To' Pray-A Second to Die"

I

* A.

I

ENDS
TONIGHT,

r

D al
8-6416

"LARGER THAN LIFE-AND JUST
POSSIBLY TWICE AS SHOCKING!"
-SATURDAY REVIEW

1.:

v -s!

:ai

F

THIS WEEK at
TON IGHT
A HOOT
An evening of endless musical variety
'Come, do your thing and sing-a-long!.H
1421 Hill St.
'THURSDAY 8:30 ?.M.
EZRA ROWREY (Head of C.O.R.E.)
speaking on
BLACK POWER
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
BOB WHITE
al time favorite returns from his tour of coffee houses on the
East coast to sing traditional ballads, fun songs and contem-
porary folk music--playing guitar, banjo and AUTOHARP.

RODGERS' & HAMMERSTEIN'S GREATEST!
See the stars-GORDON MaCRAE, SH IRLEY JONES,
ROD STEIGER and more!
Hear the songs-"Oklahoma," "Surrey with
the Fringe on Top," and more!
Friday & Saturday-7:00 & 9:30-Architecture Aud.
75c
(Note change in schedule-"Casablanco" will,
not be shown this weekend.)

r'

i "* * * ! DOUBLE-EDGED SEX !"
I~} I -NY. DAILY NEWS

SANDY DENNIS
THE

KEIR DULLEA

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D. H: LAWRENCE'S

BITTIa DvS
STMANNIVEIARY
Also Stating SHEILA HANCOCK - JACK HEDLEY - CHRISTIAN ROBERTS
JAMES COSSINS - ELAINE TAYLOR -'Prduced yJIMMY SANGSTER . - .
Directd by ROY BAKER- Screp ay byJIMMY SANG TER-colr by Deux"eAsav AitHammnrProdutios

4*

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--U-..1'
--.5..
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1Th2 1

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"A M ST EXTRAORDINARY FILM!"
-NEW YORK TIMES

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FORXIVILL6E
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LAST TWO DAYS
"GUESS WHO'S COMING
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AND MEANIN6FUL
-FILM IN YEARSI"
- LIFE MAGAZINE

ANN ARBOR
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An Agatha Christie mystery melodrama
THE
MOUSETRAP

* STARTS FRIDAY *
HARRY SALTZMAN
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