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May 14, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-14

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Tuesday, May 14, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, May 14, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pa6e Three

Meany threatens
to suspend UAW

WASHINGTON () - AFL-CIO
President George Meany said yes-
terday Walter Reuther's United
Auto Workers Union will be sus-
pended from the 14 million mem-
ber labor federation if it doesn't
$ pay its dues by tomorrow.
"This is a withdrawal" on the
part of the UAW, Meany said at
a news conference in explaining
that the AFL-CIO constitution
provides for automatic suspension
when dues are three months be-
hind.
a --__--
More defense
morey planned
WASHINGTON (P) - Congres-
sional defense experts are laying
the groundwork for continued
high defense spending in the
early 1970s, even if the Vietnam
war ends.
Hearings currently under way
by the Senate preparedness in-
vestigations subcommittee are ex-
pected to wind up soon with a
new call for development of ad-
v nced long range bombers and
.uclear submarines to- keep the
United States ahead of the Soviet
Union in military hardware.'
At the same time, Congress is
.on its way toward approving this
year the first stage of a $5-billion
limited a n t i b all i s t i c missile
(ABM) defense system. Many ex-
perts believe that will be merely
the downpayment on an eventual
expenditure of $40 billion for a
full ABM system.

Reuther and other leaders of
the 1.5 million autoworkers, larg-
est of the 128 unions in the AFL-
CIO, have . sharply criticized
Meany's leadership as undemo-
cratic and stagnant for the past
two years.
The autoworkers union at its
recent convention in Atlantic City
voted to place its approximately
$1-million per year dues in es-
crow instead of continuing pay-
ments for the AFL-CIO, pending
possible settlement of Reuther's
criticisms of the federation.
Asked whether there was any
possibility of settling the dispute,
Meany said: "I don't know what
the quarrel is all about."wy
Reuther for the past two years
has been threatening to pull his
union out of the federation un-
less the AFL-CIO adopts his de-
mands for internal reform, makes
greater efforts to organize work-
ers, and institutes many other
policy changes.
"He is taking this method of
withdrawing," Meany said of
Reuther's decision to withhold
dues.'
"I don't think it helps the fed-
eration," Meany said, "and I don't
think it helps the autoworkers."
Meany said losing the auto-
workers would reduce the AFL-
CIO's total membership to about
12.5 million in the United States,
plus another one million in Can-
ada.
"I guess we'll go on and just do
the best we can without Walter,"
Meany said.-
The two men were the principal
founders of the AFL-CIOin1955.
Reuther, then head of the old
Congress of Industrial Organiza-
tions, nominated Meany, presi-
dent of the old American Federa-
tion of Labor, to head the merged
labor federation. Meany has been
the AFL-CIO's only president.
Meany said Reuther had never
formally brought his complaints
before any official body of the
AFL-CIO.
ANNAR RD

--Associited Press
Evacuating the wounded
A U.S. soldier is carried to an evacuation helicopter in the Cholon section of Saigon after being
wounded by the shrapnel from a rocket. Viet Cong forces menacing the South Vietnamese capital
appear to be pulling back, U.S. sources claimed yesterday. -
'THIRD BALLOT NOMINEE':
McCal claims Rocky's chances
~soaring' for GOP candidacy
HONOLULU a-Gov. Tom Mc- Richard M. Nixon from sewing up Hall, former Republican na-
Call of Oregon said yesterday that the nomination. tional chairman, came to Reagan's
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller's race for "Rockefeller has an excellent hotel - room. Also present was F.
the Republican presidential nom- chance," said McCall, who is a Clifton White, the former Barry
ination is "beginning to soar" and major support the New York gov- 'Goldwater strategist who is ad-
the New York governor "may get ernor. vising Reagan's California favorite
it on the third ballot." The theme of Rockefeller back- son delegation to the national con-
McCall made the assertion at a ers is that Republicans shouldn't vention.
news conference at the western commit themselves too far before Lyn Nofziger, Reagan's commu-
governors conference, the scene of the GOP National Convention in nications director, described the
energetic behind-the-scenes efforts Miami Beach this August. meeting as social-and said that
by Rockefeller backers to prevent "I just don't think it looks heal- Hall did not suggest a ticket. Hall
thy for the party to have it locked agreed with Nofzinger's account
up 13 weeks before the day of deci- and said both he and Reagan con-
sion begins," said McCall. cluded that Nixon isn't assured of
AMCF THEI~ATER 'Nivn i +hw fnrm r inthe nomination.

RFK, McCarthy
Nebraska vote t
Delegationsa
not affected{yt}
OMAHA, Neb. (0) - Candidates
from both parties began to hedge
against possibly, unfavorable re-
sults as they wound up their
campaigning for today's Nebraska 4
presidential primary.
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy said he
doubted if he could ┬░get the 50 per
cent of the Democratic vote that
would notify prospective conven-
tion delegates that his campaign
was surging into high gear.
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, Ken-
nedy's chief rival on the ballot,
expressed confidence he will do I
better at the polls tomorrow than '
he did when he ran third ir. last
week's Indiana primary. Kennedy
got 42 per cent of the vote in
that test. McCarthy fell behind
Gov. Roger Branigin, a favorite
son candidate, with 27 per cent.I>
The Minnesota senator declined
to deal in percentages, saying that
"a horse doesn't have to predict
who's going to win a race." He
said many voters remained un-
decided on election eve.
An under-financed and publicly zi4 MX
disavowed write-in drive for Vice
President Hubert Humphrey was
not generally expected to provide
him with any significant portion Sen. Kennedy in
of the Democratic vote.
But the vice president seemed
likely to share heavily in' the COUNTING DELA Y:
state's 30-vote convention dele-_COUNT_ GDEAY
gation. The two Democratic Na-
tional Committee members, who 1T
automatically get places on the
delegation, are for Humphrey.
The 28 pother delegate votes will
be rer ed by individual win-
bound by the results of the pri,
Manrsylce.eartl n n
The undetermined factor in the PANAMA (R) - Returns from B
Democratic race is the presence Panama's presidential election 67,
of President Johnson's- name on were delayed yesterday whfle vio- five
the ballot. His Marchr 31 an- lence broke out in this. steamy clai
nouncement that he would not capital. tha
accept renomination came stoo Armed partisans of the govern- Sa
late for his name to be removed. ment candidates in Sunday's bal- had
Republican Gov. Norbert T. loting attacked a radio station 000
Tiemann said votes for Johnson that backed his opponent, killing E
could be assumed as votes for one person and wounding four eac
Humphrey, although the Presi- others. Other government back- pro
dent has not publicly offered po- ers stole a ballot box from a vot- Cit
litical help to his second mani. ing booth in an area supporting Di
Tiemann forecasted that Nixon the opposition.
would get 70 per cent of the Re- Both contending factions sm
publican vote, a prediction that claimed victory. y
former Secretary of Interior Fred But the National Election Tri- thi
Seaton took pains to down-grade. bunal, which released returns ber
Seaton, a long-time Nixon as- within hours after the polls closed Ass
sociate, said the former vice in 1964, issued no figures past
president would do well to get mid-day yesterday.
50 per cent in a contest where Indications were, however, that do
write-ins for Gov. Nelson A. the opposition was leading in un- vot
Rockefeller of New York will be official tabulations. den
a factor. A spokesman for the National hel
The Rockefeller write-in cam- Electoral Tribunal said Sunday byk
paign has been small when mea- night that only 40 precincts had min
sured by the customary standards reported results and these gave -
of money spent and workers in "a slight edge" to the government ,he
the field. candidate, David Samudio, 57. late

seek
oday

-Associated Press
Nebraska

HOPKINS
CENTER

SUMMER ACTIVITIES
Repertery Class
Ann Young will teach her dance "Caracole"
Thursday evenings 7:30-9:00 at Jones' School
beginning May 16-July 8. Fee $1.50/class.
For further information call Ann Young, 662-4654

txon ,ne former vice presioent,
is generally regarded as the front
runner.'
Gov. Ronald Reagan of Califor-
nia and Leonard Hall, a key ad-
viser, met for 30 minutes behind
closed doors Sunday. Both Hall
and aReagan spokesman said yes-
terday they made no deals but
agreed that Nixon doesn't have
the Republican nomination sewed
up.

"I don't think anyone has it tied
up at this time and it will be some
time until it develops," Hall told
newsmen.
The meeting with Reagan was
one of several Hall had with GOP
governors here for the annual
meeting of chief executives of the
13 western states and the terri-
tories of American Samoa ,and
Guam.

AT
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
SUMMER
MUSIC
SPROGRAM
Mario diBonaventura, Director 'of
Music, announces a music pro-
gram for students of the perform-
ing arts . . . SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA and CHAMBER MUSIC
CONCERTS . . . PRIVATE IN-
STRUCTION . . CO-EDUCA-
TIONAL.
Lectures and concerts under
the supervision of
Composers-in-Residence"
ALBERTO GINASTERA
EASLEY BLACKWOOD
NIELS VIGGO BENTZON
Visiting Composers
Andrew Ernst Walter
IMBRIE KRENEK PISTON
MARIO diBONAVENTURA
Conductor
Dartmouth Symphony Orchestra
20 Orchestra and
Chamber Concerts
MASTER CLASSES
SALVATORE ACCARDO, Violin
HANS HEINZ, Voice
NOEL LEE, Piano
PAUL OLEFSKY, Cello
BARRY TUCKWELL, French Horn
PHILADELPHIA STRING
QUARTET
Veda Reynolds, Violin
Irwin Eisenberg, Violin
Allan Iglitzih, Viola
Charles Brennand, Cello
ARTIST FACULTY: Salvatore Ac-,
cardo, violin; Everett Beale, per-
cussion; Crawford Best, bassoon;
Charles Brennand, cello; Domi-
nick deGangi, trumpet, brass en-
sembles; Lucas Drew, double' boss;
Irwin Eisenberg, violin; John Far-
rar, chamber ensemble; Alfred
Genovese, oboe; Robert Genovese,
clarinet; Paul Olefsky, cello; Vedo
Reynolds, violin; Victor Stern,
viola; Barry Tuckwell, french
horn; Donald Wendlandt, clari-
net; Dean Werner, trombone,
ass ensembles; Robert Willough-
by, flute; Paul Zeller, choral di-
rector.
FOURTH

i

ts Paiiama
s dispute
ut backers of Arnulfo Arias,
the candidate of a powerful
-party opposition coalition,
med he had a margin of more
n 5,000 votes in Panama City.
mudio's headquarters said he
a nationwide margin of 12,-
to 14,000 votes.
ven before the polls closed,
h side staged small victory
cessions in downtown Panama
X. Antonio Gonzalez Revilla,
neurosurgeon backed by the
all Christian Democratic par-
was expected to run a poor
d. Voters also chose 42 mem-
s of the one chamber National
embly.
'he election campaign produced
risis in which the opposition-
ninated National Assembly
ed to oust the current presi-
t, Marco A. Robles, claiming
had violated the constitution
backing Samudio, his finance
nister.
'he National Guard 'blocked
ouster and the Supreme Court
er overruled the assembly. At
height of the dispute, a brief
flared in Panama City
rch 28.
'here were signs of govern-
nt pressures during the voting,
luding authenticated reports
stolen ballot boxes, intimida-
ny andearrests of opposition
rty leaders.
arias, twice deposed fronm the-
sidency, contended the Na-
nal Guardsmen in the interior
idated his followers and
t them from the polls.

Senator' Eugene J. MCarthy
Bobby, Richard, Hubert, Nelson, Lyndon, Bump, Harmon Kil-
lebrew, Sammy Davis, Bart Starr, Ursula Andress, The Ancient
Mariner, Tiny Tim,

Open: WHISTLE STOP
Serving Hot Roost Beef and Corned Beef Sand-
wiches. Fast take out service. In our delicatessen
department-Hebrew National products.

the
riot
Ma
T
mer
finc
of
rl
tion
into
kep

611 S. FOREST
Across from
AA parking structure

WEEKDAYS:
11 A.M. to 12 Midnight
FRIDAYS and SATURDAYS:
Until 2 A.M.

IN

FACT

EVERYONE,

except Dicky Tarrier,

i
f

IS INVITED TO THE NORTH CAMPUS COMMONS FOR
BREAKFAST FROM 6:45 A.M. TO 8:30 A.M.

and of course, IL
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
NORTH ICAMI

inch and dinner, too.
6:45-8:30
11:30-1:15
5:15-7:00
PUS COMMONS

Jeff Schneider, formerly of Columbia U.
S.D.S. will speak tonight at 8:30 P.M. on:
WHAT HAPPENED AT
COLUMBRIA
-3-KLMN, MICHIGAN UNION--FREE, All Welcome
First hand report, discussion, literature, slides
some major errors in press reporting.
Jeff was a participant in the actions from the beginning of the
sit-ins through the arrests and beginning of the strike.)
TONIGHT (Tues., May 14) at 8:30-Sponsored by VOICE-SDS
Wayne County Child'Development Center
We need teachers who meet the following qualifications:
1. Have at least a B.A. or B.S. plus expressed commitment
to continue their education towards M.A. or M.S.,
preferably in Special Educ.
a. must attend advanced classes in
Special Educ. totaling
b. a minimum of 9 semester hrs./year
2. Have not passed their 40th birthday (beginning teacher)
Citizen of U.S.

Ii

III

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