100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 14, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILlr

Tuesday. May 14. 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

NASULGC REPORT:I
Public Negro colleges
need nfboost

New bylaw proposal DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

x

WASHINGTON (CPS) -- The
nation's public Negro colleges need
significant increases in financing
before they can expand their role
as "opportunity colleges," accord-
ing to a report issued by the Na-
tional Association of State Uni-
versities and Land-Grant Colleges
(NASULGC).
The report-which says the 356
predominantely Negro public col-
leges have reached a critical point
in their history-calls on corpora-
tions and other private sources of
philanthropy to provide a massive
upsurge in their support of these
institutions.
"Despite their many contribu-
tions to society, these institutions4
are the 'forgotten colleges' when
it comes to private support," the

NASULGC report says. Public Ne-
gro colleges get less than one per
cent of their total income from
private colleges. "Because public
institutions are not included in
the United Negro College Fund,
th'ey are cut off from this major
source of corporate and founda-
tion support," according to the
report.
Traditionally, public Negro in-
stitutions have relied heavily on
state governments for operating,
funds. The NASULOC report,
however, says "the share of pub-
lic college and university income
from state sources is decreasing,
even though state dollars for
higher education are increasing."
This presents special problems
to Negro institutions, which for

Columbia, U inquiry
faces student bo ycott

NEW YORK (A')-A blue ribbon
panel headed by former U.S. So-
licitor General Archibald Cox
opened hearings yesterday into"
the "why" of the turmoil at Co-
lumbia University, but rebel stu-
dents refused to testify.
Cox said the fact-finders plan
a "broad and far reaching in-
quiry" into the Columbia demon-
strations. He also announced the
appointment of John S. Martin
Jr., his former special assistant,
as counsel to the commission, to
"help shape" the hearings.
The hearing opened with the
refusal of two student groups to
.Say Viet
pacifying,,-
'0
nmproving
SAIGON (M)-The Viet Cong's
latest offensive had almost no
effect on the government's pacifi-
cation program, the U.S. Com-
mand said yesterday.
A detailed report on the .results
of the offensive unlashed on May
5 said only the area around Sai-
gon and two Mekong Delta pro-
vinces on the Cambodian border
were seriously affected.
LIGHT I1kPACT
Thirty-nine of South Vietnam's
44 provinces were virtually un-
touched,, the report said, and the
psychological impact, on the popu-
lation as a whole was infinitely
smaller than during the Tet of-
fensive that began Jan. 31 and"
continued well into February.
The still unpublished report was
compiled by Ambassador Robert
W. Komer, head of the U.S. Com-
mand's Office of Revolutionary
Development Support (CORDS),
which directs the pacification
program.
OUTPOSTS LOST
Only 16 of more than 4,000
government outposts were lost or
abandoned since May 5, the re-
port said. Of these, 10 have since
been reoccupied.
Of more than 700 Revolutionary
Development teams, only six were
withdrawn from hamlets for se-
curity reasons or to assist in the
defense of provincial or district
capitals. Four of these were in
Gia Dinh Province around Sai-
gon, where the beaviest fighting
took place.
At the height of the Tet offen-
sive, 300 teams were pulled back
into the cities. It provides a dra-
matic comparison of the vastly
differing affects of the two at-
tacks, the report said.

testify. Spokesmen for a group
called Black Students from Ham-
ilton Hall said the absence of
representatives of the Negro com-
munity indicated the "unimpar-
tiality" of the commission. The
Student S t r i k e Coordinating
Committee claimed the panel has
"little relation to the broader
body of university faculty and
no relation to the students of"
the university."
The student strikers said in a
statement that the panel's func-
tion was "to divert attention from
the issues and to channel energy
into safe areas." They said "the
administration would rather ob-
scure the issues than confront
them here."
The, five-man panel was named
May 5 by the executive commit-
tee of the Columbia faculty. The
committee asked the panel to es-
tablish the chronology of events
that ledto the disturbancesand
to look into the underlying
causes of the problems.
In addition to Cox, now a mem-
ber of the faculty of Harvard Law
School, the panel includes Dr.
Dana L. Farnsworth, director of
University Health Services at
Harvard; Jefferson B. Fordham,
dean of the University of Penn-
sylvania Law School; Hylan G.
Lewis, Brooklyn College sociology
professor; and Simon H. Rifkind,
a former federal judge, now In
private law practice.'Co sad h w ul tke
Cox asaid hea would take testi-
mony from all those involved -.
administration officials and stu-
dents, including leaders of the
Students for a Democratic So-
ciety, which started the protest.
The demonstration began April
23. Students seized control of five
buildings and shut down the uni-
versity until a police raid early on
the morning of April 30 during
which more than 100 persons were
injured and more than 700 arrest-
ed. The university has 25,000 stu-
dents.
The leaders of the student
1emonstration then called for a
general strike and almost all nor-
mal classes ended four weeks be-
fore the official term ending.
The initial reason for the dem-
onstration was to protest. Colum-
bia's plans tq build a gymnasium
Sin'Morningside Park on the edge;
of Harlem. The protest widened
to Include demands for more stu-
dent control of the Ivy League
university.,

years have received relatively less
money from states than white
colleges and universities, and
need "extra, 'catch up' funds to
become truly equal in quality."
The report emphasizes that na-
tionally declining state contribu-
tions generally lead to increased
tuition. Since the average parental
income of students attending pub-
lic Negro colleges is only about
$3,300 a year, increased tuitions
at Negro colleges are "a severe
threat to educational oppor-
tunity."
The NASULGC study also shows
that relatively small amounts of
federal funds have gone to Negro
institutions. "Recent work-study
and scholarship programs, as well
as the federal programs designed
to help 'developing' institutions,
have benefited some but not all
of / these institutions," it says.
"Many are unable to take full
advantage 'of federal student aid
and construction programs be-
cause they cannot raise their re-
quired matching' share of the
funds for the programs. They also
lack funds to carry out necessary
planning ,studies on which to base
applications for federal funds."
The report briefly comments
on the future of Negro colleges,
the subject of several controver-'
sial studies within recent years.
Despite the numerous criticisms
of Negro colleges, NASULOC re-
jects the idea of phasing out or
closing these institutions. "The
Negro public college will doubt-
less change. But it will trot die.
It has a vital role to play in ex-
tending educational opportunity."
The report adds, "The future of
these-colleges lies beyond serving
only one race . . . nearly all en-
roll white students and have white
faculty members . . . Like alt
other public colleges and univer-
sities, Negro institutions are fac-
ing up to the challenge of pro-
viding low-cost, high-quality edu-
cation to students of all races."
However, NASULOC alsosays,
"Any reasonable estimate of the
speed of desegregation indicates
that most of these institutions
will continue to enroll large ma-
jorities of Negro .students for at
least the immediate future .
Furthermore, Negro students, like
white students, look upon their
college experience as a social, as
well as an academic opportunity.
This continues to make the pre-
dominately Negro institutions es-
pecially attractive to them. More-
over, 'in thesecolleges, students
find opportunities s nd experiences
that could not be duplicated else-
where."
In asking for privates support,
the report says faculty improve-
ment is one of the major priority
areas it raising the quality of
Negro colleges.
ri

sparks controversyk
(Continued from Page 1) " As of last Friday," he said, "the
drawn up in bylaw form. The Re- only objection Koeneke had was
gents also requested that Cutler that he didn't think UC should
make sure there would be no be tri-partite." Cutler told Koe-
possibility of a "stalemate" in the neke he could submit his objection
new system. to the Regents separately.
SGC member-at-large Thomas Another commission member,
Westerdale, Grad, said, "It is un- Bernard Galler of the mathematics
fair to work on these things dur- department agreed with Robertson
ing vacations or exam times. that UC regulations were meant
When people are tied up /or out to include "faculty and admin-
of town how can they be properly istrators."
represented?"
At an open hearing with the
Commission members last month, T bFh
Robertson said the Regents and Trouble hits
Commission agreed "that there
would be a small tri-partite com-
mittee to consider implemen~ta- n o Inar
tion" of the report. -
Although no formal commit- (Continued from Page 1)
tee was ever set up, Cutler con- marchers coming off the buses
ferred with Koeneke, Neff, Prof.
Irving Copi of the philosophy de not to talk to reporters "until you
partment and Prof. R o b e r t get clearance from security."
Knauss of the Law School on the Accommodations for campaign-
rough drafts of the proposal, ers staying overnight were ar-
which were drawn up by William ranged by the Detroit Support
Steude, director of student-com- Committee of the Poor People's
munity relations. Campaign.
University Activities Center Over 2300 offers of housing
P r e s i d e n t Daniel McCreath were made available to marchers,!
charged Cutler is "trying to rail- mostly from private homes in the
road the thing through." suburbs.
Neff claimed the vice-president The New Detroit Committee,
had not allowed he and Koeneke formed in the aftermath of the
sufficient time to study the docu- riots last year, gave $10,000 to the
ment before making their recomi- Support Committee. The archdio-
mendations. .hcese of Detroit gave $5000 and
'Davis claims "they haven't ser- Judge George Crockett of Re-
iously consulted the students on corders Court donated $2000 per-,
matters which affect their lives. sonally.
They just haven't learned their The Rev. A. D. King, brother of
lesson." the late Martin Luther King, was
"They can't appoint members to with the marchers earlier in the
UC until August ,anyway. What's day but had to leave for Wash-
their rush?" he added. ington beforerthe rally.
Student members of UC are to ayor Jerome Cavanagh paid
be selected by SGC, which does not the marchers a surprise welcome
hold regular meetings during the visit as they gathered for lunch
summer semester, outside a midtown church. I
Cutlr dfendd ue ofthehope your campaign makes an I;
Cutler defended the use of theimpression on Congress,"' Cava-
terms "students and student 'agn sad.
groups," in place of "the Univer- Box lunches of food were do-
sity community" because "it has nated by churches and manufac-
been my hope that when we draft-urers.
ed the judiciary." He feels that if One spokesman for the march-
UC makes regulations for the en- ers said, "This is the first time
tire University community the we have willingly been given some
idea- of a ,student judiciary would, kind of recognition by officials."
have to be sacrificed.' A suburban high schooler who
Robertson explained the Com- served as a hostess for the cam-
mission intended "the word 'com- paigners at Cobo Hall called thej
munity' to mean all facets of the scene "sad." It was like a slap
University group" including fac- in the face," she added, iexplain-
ulty and staff at all levels. , ing that she found the poor very
"I would not interpret it as sole- difficult to talk to.
Ly students," he added. "The Regents are not necessary
Cutler' expressed surprise, that: going to buy what Cutler says 100
there' was any controversy at all. per cent," he added.

:iv".1 :4..5 1}}° ':{,..:bi:{1 v"' .vS.' p v . v ^. ^.
.:ir ':" '....,.,,.... :.. t.? rr.tt-:}::4 {:*: s'ct s.,Y*,^ ,. {?' h ?h ^, i 'i ~ff

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday 'and Sunday. General
Notices may be puisihed a maxi-

.,.. -Vu~aalac it1214Ll-i3LTEAUOF PPOINTMENTS
ma ofar two simssonrrequest;Day Foreign Visitors3?0SAB
Calendar items appear only once. 'g GENERAL DIVISION
Student organization notices are p GNRLDvSO
Stnot ccepted afornpublic eso. Fre The following are foreign visitors Peace Corps Test given this Satur-
not accepted for publication. For who can be reached through the For-,, day, 1:30 p.m., May 18, 1968. Down-
more information call '764-9270 eign visitor Programs Office, 764-2148. town Branch of Post office. Main at
Miss Ann McCue, Miss Carol Brooks, Catherine Streets. Applications should
TUESDAY, MAY 14 Graduate students in Psychiatric Nurs- be completed before examination, these
ing, May 12-14. are available at the Bureau of Appts,
Mr. Benjamin Machado., Attorney General Division.
General of Administrative Counsel of
"a y a en a Economic Defense of the Ministry of Placement Openings received cur-
SJustice for Brazil, May 14. rently by mall and phone, please call
Horizons in Manufacturing Tech- ' 764-7460 for further information:
nology - Registration, Chrysler Bldg.' . Raymond Marginson, Vice-Prin- Bristol Laboratories, Syracuse, N.Y.-
8:15 a.m. cipal, University of Melbourne, As- Bacteriologist, BS/MS, 0-5 yrs. exper.
trla(ay1-7 in production. Pharmacists, BS/MS.
Elements of outdoor Recreation Plan- Dr. Shou-Sheng Hsueh, Assistant Di- Chemical Engineer MS pref. plus ex-
ling-Morning Session, Field Trip, rebtor, Institute of Chinese Studies, per; Clinical Research Associate, 3-plus
8:30 a.m. Chinese University, Hong Kong, May yrs .in clinical trials. Scl. Programmer,
15-18" 'min. 1 yr. autocoder IOCS and/or
Tennis - U-M vs. University 1Of r. and Mrs. 0. 0. Mbau, African COBOL. Programmer/Analyst, 3-plus
am, Ferry Field, Personnel Officer de Beers Mines. yrs. inventory control, 360 exper. Bud-
a South Africa, May 17-25. get Analysts. Cost Analyst. Product
f } "Analyst, MBA Mktg. mgr. Market Re-
General Notices search, MBA pref. plus 3 yrs. Chemist,
z:+x1;+ ag : N .. ... .S.. ..4. k BS/MS plus 0-5 yrs.
Women's Gymnastics Club will meet City of Kalamazoo, Mich. -- Planner,
on Monday nights during Spring Term RGA N IZAT I N two vacancies, bckrnd. planning, e-
7-9 at Barbour Gym. Open Gym Tues-O RGA N IA1I O\N ographytarchitecture, engineering,
day nights 7 -9 at Barbour Gym, Spring: concentration on zoning matters.
Term __ N OT IrE Standard Educational Corporation,
"-'II ~I.-".JChicago, Ill. - Recent fbi. major, em-
Tuition Refund Schedule-TheRegw<, phasis on botany for editorial staff
istrar will honor studenterefunds of ecyclopedifor.needso r.a
through 4:00 p.m. on the dates igiven Use of this column for. announce- sr. high students and laymen, will
below. Iments is available to officially train.
spring- Spring Summer recognized and registered student Wilson & Co., Chicago, i. - Bac-
Kind of Summer z , organizations only. Forms are gst, 'Res. and Tech. Div ES
Refund Term Term Term available in room 1011 SAB. microblol. plus 1-2 yrs. in foods.
1100% State of Washington - Community
withdrawal May 15 May 15 July 11 * * Counselor, BA in Soc. or other soc. sci.
Reduction, Bach Club M eting, Thurs., May 16. plus 2 yrs. in behavior modification
course load May 15 May 15 July 1 8:00 p.m., Guild house, 802 Monroe, programs in community mental health
50% '' Program 1)' Elections of officers forI or retardation facility, Welfare Ad-
Withdrawal June 13 May 22 July 13 spring and summer; 2) Bach's D Minor ministrator, III, Min. 1 yr. soc. wik.
Appropriate adjustments will be made Triple Harpsichord Concerto. For fur.I school grad. study plus two of supv..
for students in schools having opening ther information call 769-2750 or 769- exper in public welfare, or BA and
dates other than May 1 and June 26. 2922.' three, years.
Women's Gymnastics Club will meet ..w._.-_____.__
on Monday nights during Spring Term,
7-9 at Barbour Gym. Open Gym Tues.
nhts 7-9 at' Barbour Gym .shring "rn n % - T A&%nAv KU C U 1!!

and one unbound - two abstracts,
and the Chairman's report on the final
oral examination must be submitted
to the Dissertation Secretary by Mon.,
July 15. (Fees must be paid and paper-
work completed by that second dead-
line). The new edition of the Doctoral
Handbook is available in Room 1004
Rackham.

Doctoral
Examinations
Theodore Leroy Ploughman, Educea-
tion, Dissertation: "The Implementa-
tion. Operation ,and Evaluation of Re-
gional Data Processing Services Piovid-
ed or Anticipated by Michigan's Inter-
mediate School Districts." on rues..
May 14 at 9 a.m. in Room 4200 Uni-
versity High School, Chairman: M. C.
Johnson.
Placement

4

'4

Term.
Doctoral Candidates who plan to
graduate August 4 must observe the
following deadlines: (A) Three un-
bound copies of the dissertation, com-
plete in every way except for binding,
and three abstracts must be submitted
to the Rackham Dissertation Secretary?
by Mon., June 17. (B) Two corrected
copies'of the dissertation - one bound
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
MGM presents
An AllenKlein Production starring
Tony Anhonv{:

A MU1 LAIRAUKUINAKT rLM:
--NEW YORK TWOE
ONE OF 'THE THE
THE MANY ALGERIAN "f C
WOMEN... STREET COLONEL.
whoBOY, who was
stopped who became forced even'
at nothing a rebei to torture!
to win! hero!b

THE REVOLT
THAT STIRRED
TE WOLD I

1 rnru OF

An ALLIED AMT=T
Gene Wesson. Albert sohwartz & Harry DiamondUowA FILM OF GILLO PONTECORVO Re
"IT SHOULD BE SEEN"-Okrent, Daily
Features-Mon. thru Thurs.-7 :00, 9:05
- ml

Dial
NO 2-6264

Last 2 Days

I

WED.-SAT.-SUN.
1-3-5-7-9
OTHER DAYS 7:00-9:00

4I

A GERSHvWIN
KASINER PRODUICIION
BATBAREHI
DAVID STELLA TELLY RIP
Anhony njane t eCharles 4IJ1J? SH NS SA'MASJOIR11
Quin omrBosn!~ M)I'

1

MMO

SUMMER JOBS

I

There is still time to apply for
summer resort employment this
year!
Throughout the nation college
students are indemand for surm
mer resort employment. Not only
is the pay usually good-with tips
students often earn $100-$150
per week and get free room and
board-but the hours are usually
short, and the after-hours excit
For a resort directory of hotels,
motels, and lodges, send $1 .00 to
AmD isCo, University Station, P.O.
Box 14563, Gainesville, Florida
32601.

i

I

1:00-4:20-7:45

PANAViSIONand METROCOLOR
2:50-6:15-9:35

THURS. . Bette Davis "THE ANNIVERSARY"

11

J

Today at
7-9 P.M.,

1

Ending
Wednesday

. '1

"1

"LARGER THAN LIFE-AND JUST
POSSIBLY TWICE AS SHOCKING!"
-SATURDAY REVIEW
" *! DOUBLE-EDGED SEX !"

.. MICHIGRM

2 ACADEMY
AWARD NOMINEES

PAUL
N EWMAN
in
"Cool Hand Luke"
at 1:20-5:30-9:30

AUDREY
HEPBURN
in
"Wait Until Dark"
at 3:30 & 7:40 only

II SANDY DENNIS

-N.Y. DAILY NEWS
KEIR DULLEA
R.H. LAWRENCE'S
P_ - Cfl

THE
CL..

VOICE-SDS
Committee on' Racism
in Ann Arbor
Tues., 6:00, 2nd ff. SA
Everyone, Welcome
SDS office: 663-661

FRIDAY:

"A Minute To Pray-A Second to Die"

B

NATIONAL GENERAL CORbINe
FOX EASTERN THEATRE S
FOXMAPL.6E
375 No.MAPLE RD,,791300

___ _II

I

THURSDAY LAST DAY
"Guess Who's Coming
To'Dinner"
7:00-9:20

......

University Ch frter
Caledonias Airwayt
FLY TO
LONDON
from
DETROIT

*STARTS TOMORROW *
BRAIN"
$COLORby0etuxe PANAISIOA a u o ARTISTS
plus

ANN ARBOR
CIVIC THEATRE
PRESENTS
An Agatha Christie mystery melodrama
THE
MOUSETRAP
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE

i

I

I

:. +,"}sr t' w rt'x E hy " '' f d'',? ar 'fi f f 'dj K r + o .t, ,..r k r r.. ' .., f f .

tI

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan