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May 10, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-10

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MPPM"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, May 10, 1968

Friday May 1. 196

I .

ummer concert series: Beat the reruns

DIAL 5th
8-6416W E
SAN~l)Y IENN ,IS 'KEIR L)ULLIAL
AIN'I I FIV'())I ) i:i \ \t{4.11 I{

I

By R. A. PERRY
Ann Arbor's entertainment
schedule has begun its sum-
mer eclipse, but Gail Rector,
manager of the University Mu-
sical Society, has booked four
pianists whose concerts should
make any music lover pleased
to be in town.
Opening the summer series,
which will take place in the air
conditioned and intimate Rack-
ham Auditorium, will be the
exciting Spanish pianist, Alicia
de Larrocha.
Miss de Larrocha's recent
Epic recordings of the piano
music of Granados have been
repeated sell-outs and have left
music critics wallowing In ec-
static panegyrics to her impec-
cable technical ability and ex-
quisite rhythmic shadings, both
so important to the Spanish
/repertoire that she has made
her specialty.
That Miss de Larrocha is Di-
rector of the Marshall Academy
in Barcelona, the school which
perpetuates the "Granados tra-
dition," helps to explain her
authority in the works of Span-
ish masters such as Albeniz,
Turina, de Falla, and Grana-
dos.
New York Times critic Har-

old Schonberg has stated that
she "has a Toscanini-like ap-
proach to playing the piano, in
her insistence that every strand
-melody, bass, inner voices-
comes through." Her unerring
technique, however, only serves
the passion of the music and
the communication of passion
to the listener.
Her Rackham concert June
27 should be a most interesting,
one, as she will be playing not
only pieces by de Falla, but
also the K. 333 sonata of Mo-
zart, and works by Couperin,
Schumann, and Rachmaninoff.
The second' featured pianist
will be the internationally ac-
claimed Vladimir Ashkenazy.
Ashkenazy has won the Chopin
Competition in Warsaw, the
Queen Elizabeth Competition
in Brussels, and the Tchaikov-
sky Competition in Moscow.
Although this Soviet artist's
technique is also beyond ques-
tion, heais known, mainly for his
poetic and sensitive renderings
of the Romantics, especially
Schubejt and Chopin. He is a
master of subtle coloration, but
he can provide power and
forcefulness when such is called
for.
Mr. Ashkenazy has scheduled

forf his July 10th appearance
the "Moonlight" =and "Wald-
stein" sonatas by Beethoven, as
well as twelve Etudes by Chopin.
The young Israeli pianist,
David Bar-Illan, who will per-
form in Rackham July 16, has
not yet won the renown that
accompanies Ashkenazy and de
Larrocha.
A graduate of both the Juil-
lard and Mannes Schools of
Music, Bar-Illan has been, how-
ever, steadily building an inter-
national reputation. He first

appeared with the Israeli Phil-
harmonic under Mitropoulos,
and then made his American
debut with the New York Phil-
harmonic.
Bar-Illan's Ann Arbor recital
promises to be a most diverse
one. It will include works by
Debussy, Rameau, Chopin, Ben-
Haim, and Beethoven, and will
be climaxed by a performance
of Liszt's "Dante Sonata."
The phenomenon of Jorge
Bolet, the fourth artist on the
summer series, is a curious one.

Bolet, who has been compared
to Horowitz and Liszt himself,
has won a greater reputation in
Europe than he has in the
States.
His recording for the movie
biography of Franz Liszt, "Song
Without End", may have won
him some fans, but it might
also have earned him the un-
warranted stigma of a popular-
izer.
Yet his pianistic technique
has made him something of, a
myth: one critic in Berlin
wrote that "Bolet is one of the
last great representatives of the
old tradition of piano-playing
which goes back to Liszt him-
self."
Bolet has made fewer record-
ings than the pianists who will
precede him in the Ann Arbor
series, and his program has yet
been unannounced.
Tickets for the concerts are
available from the University
Musical Society in Burton Tow-
er. A series ticket costs as little
as $6.00, which makes each con-
cert come out costing less than
a third-rerun at a local movie
theatre.

0

A look at...'

r

FEATURES

Program Information:
Dial NO 2-6264

'The Battle of Algiers"

l

(S

by Daniel Okrent

Vladimir Ashkenizy

!i

.1

The eyes of a small French boy, licking an ice cream cone in
a streetside cafe moments before a plastic bomb demolishes the
building and everything in it; a ragged garbage collector, hunched
on a curb and chased away by the venomous abuse of nearby
French colonials; a female terrorist, nervously waiting to pass an
army checkpoint as an explosive ticks in her purse; the clean,
honest lechery of a French soldier at the checkpoint.
These are the battles and thle bullets,. the mottoes and the
issues, the clutching agony of The Battle of Algiers (the film)
and the Battle of Algiers (the revolution). It is a whole made up
of individual expression and action, a massive affair particularized
in sQlo terms.
Director Gillo Pontecorvo, who earnestly set out to recreate
the peoples' revolution in Algeria that has since become the guid-
ing light and form of all similar revolutions since, astutely dis-
plays the truth of any popular uprising. By masterfully recreating
the revolution through a subtle focus on individuals within the
mob, he catches the true spirit of the affair. The expression of the
mass iq a manifestation of that of each individual.
This approach, of course, is nothing new--wars and revolu-
tions, portrayed in a film, have always been displayed as personal
experience for a handful of characters. The whole genre of World
War II and Korean War action films always had an Audie Murphy
or Jimmy Stewart or John Wayne through which and to which
the effects of the war were interpreted.
But Pontecorvo does his individualizing in anonymous terms.
There are leading characters who serve as vehicles for the tense
tight, narrative; but the real be-all of the two-year segment of the
battle 'that is featured is shown in the nameless, unidentifiable
side characters: the one-shot terrorists who murder with a weapon
concealed in a handbag; the terrified bystanders who witness the
invasion of Algiers' Arab quarter; the young French soldiers who
torture terrorists with expressionless, placid eyes, not savage or
6adistic, simply passive, doing a job.
The resulting image is remarkable. Pontecorvo's painstaking
reconstruction of massive rioting (the credits boast that no news-
reel footage was used at any point of the film) shows an excruciat-
ingly close attention to the detail etched in each person's face
without becoming possessed and obsessed in the process. These
people emote like few I have seen before in a film.
It should be mentioned, too, that those "main" characters -
the three or four who develop specific personalities and maintain
them as they participate in the length of the film-are humans, not
heroes. Particularly worth note are Ali-la-Pointe, the last of the
NILF General Staff to be captured, and Lt. Col. Philippe Mathieu,
leader of the French forces sent to squash the rebellion.

Dial
5-6290

I

PUL N B
just bugs the Establishment as
COOL HaND EHKE
TECHNICOLOR® PANAVISIONO
n ANP
AUDREY
HEPBURN
ALAN
ARKIN-
RICHARD
CRENNA T rv,
WIT UNTIL 2

I

. ISAVA AS RIPTORN
wrl'soL MADID'
41 HINGLK AU AMS.,dICARDO MONTABA
pe. djwb e e PANAISION
Mrtore Audiences AIKA? AI[J 8M IJNMERCIO MGM
2:50-6:15-9:35

sorringEFREM ZIMBALIST, JR.
* TECHNICOLOR" FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTSV
SCHEDULE OF PERFORMANCES
COOL HAND LUKE at 1:20-5:25-9:30
WAITUNTIL DARK of3:10 and 7:15 only

Sam Jaffe -Silvia Pinal -Jorge Martinez De Hoyos Jose Chavez
and Jaime Fernandez James R. Webb
1:00-4:20-7:45
FRANSCOPE and METROCOLQO. MGM

. r. _ _ _ __ _.___ _. _.w, _ ._______ _____.
. .. _._...._.v _ _,......._..__.__ .. _. _._... _ . __ ..._ ___. _ __,...... _. ... _ , .w__ __._ _. _. . _....__..__. , _ _ _ t t - - __ ___.__ . _ __

Space prohibits more being
much, much more.
Simply, it should be seen.
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
killer

said about this film, but there is

CINEMA'GUILD

4

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