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May 08, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-05-08

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1968

Page Two

HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 8,

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

;. :. _

,
,. ,

records

Dorms may be filled State phone workers

0

Little Sherri gets into

By LITTLE SHERRI FUNK
Rock 'n' Roll Expert
All right, 'let's get this "Sgt.
Pepper" stuff out of the way
first so we can -get into some-'
thing important.
An album called "Colours"
by a group called Colours has
recently been released by Dot
records ,(DLP 25854). (If you
will remember, Dot was the
company that brought you Pat
Boone. Enough for nostalgia.)¢
It's a good album, possibly
even a \very good album, but
there is one real fly stranded in
Colours ointment.
THE FLY: "Hey Harry!
These guys sound life they're
imitating "Sgt. Pepper."
Yes, rock aficiondos, it does,
sound a' great deal like last
June's monstrous Beatle epic,
the album that either destroyed
or gave birth to modern rock,
depending on how you look at
it.
Much of the rhythms we all
grooved to last summer are
there in "Colours." The piano
from "A Day in the Life" -is"
there ("Dragged a comb across
my head ,. .." you remember).
The second side has the colos-
sal- ga to open with a sitar.
You can hear sequels to ."Fix-
ing a fHole," "When I'm 64,"
and "Lovely Rita."
.Put, (and here's the 'import-
ant stuff) this is a good album
for this day and age because'
it has something which ;seems.
to have nearly vanished from
the rock scene.
THE SOMETHING: Taste.
Yes, taste.

r

The arrangenents are taste-
ful, the use of orchestration is
,asteful, and the harmonies are
tasteful. This characteristic
makes the album fresh and
appealing despite the obvious.
Beatle hang-up.
Rock music has neveir exper-
ienced any type of linear pro-
gression (or regression) as Paul
Williams has been so careful
tojpoint out. It instead more or
less explodes in every direction
at once, a fact that most of the
hot-shot new rock critics over-
look. You see, they weren't lis-
tening to rock five or ten years
ago, being content to dismiss it
as "the kids'-noise." But now,
caught uip in an art form they
know nothing about, an, art
form in which the only per-
spective can be obtained by-
living in the music, they apply
meaningless labels, trends, and
phoney intellectualism to the
rock scene.
Though, as I mentioned be-
fore, the rock scene explodes
in all directions, ,there seems
'to be, on pact of the scene any-
way, a trend towads tasteful-
ness on one hand and untaste-
fulness (heavy?) on the other.
Groups like Blue Cheer,
Autosalvage, and Dr. John the
Night Tripper (or whoever he
is) have- become so heavy that
it's almost impossible to listen
to them. They beat you over
the head again and again and
again, making up for their lack'
of talent by capitalizing on a
gimmick.
THE GIMMICK: Being heavy.
Not that I'm necessarily

against heavy music per se,
but as my friend Suzy once told
me. "It's no good if it's just a
gimmick." Blue Cheer is mak-
ing a lot of money off of' a
heavy 'version of "Summertime
Blues" surely th' most gim-
micky offering since drug or
sex allusions in songs. But it
sells records, baby, and the hip'
people like it so it must be good.
At the other end of the taste
spectrum are Simon and Gar-
funkel. They are so incredibly,
inhumanly tasteful that it
makes us all want to grab
Paul Simon and rub his face in
the mud. But at least "Book-
ends" probably won't induce
nausea on a purelyv physical
level but it's very possible that
"Vinebus Eruptum" might.
Back to Colours now. Here is
a group, an American group
by the way, which has discov-
ered how to be tasteful and yet
not deny some of Rock's pre-
cious screaming heritage.
Their lyrics are occasionally
a delight as on "Bad Day at
Black Rock, Baby" and' "Help-
ing You Out.",
The arrangements .are very
"right" for their songs, with
the crowning achievement be-
ing "Brother Lou's Love Col-
ony." This cut features the best
use of an orchestra I've ever
heard in a rock context. At the
end of yvery two lines, there is
this half second or sd of a full
orchestra playing "DUM!" and
it's, incredible.
They even include the by
now standardr '30s number, in

Colours'
this case being "Don't You
Realize."
Possibly the toughest cut on
the album is "Rather Be Me."
The liner notes call it "a nul-
ber about identity" which is
undoubtedly the stupidest thing
that has been written on an al-
bum cover since the "Turn Turn
Turn" cover where the guy said
"The Byrds ara eclectic. Not
electric, eclectic. Look it up in
your dictionary,"
Dot Records has a lot to
learn about the philosophy of
liner notes. If notes are to te
included at all, and on many,
many albums they shouldn't be,
they should be light, literate,
and informative. They should
merely provide something to
sort of look at while listening
to the album.
The album is an outstanding
first effort for the group, but
like the Beegees, Colours has to
get out of the Beatle bag. Al-
though second albums are gen-
erally getting my award for
"Bringdowns of the Year," I
have high 'hopes for the next
Colours effort. It could be
great.
Listen to this album, you
might really like it.-
* * *
The hard rock of the '50s is
once again all around us. Reis-
sues of Bill Haley and Buddy
Holly hits in England are lead-
ing the way, along with such
fare as "Lady Madonna"' and
"Call Me Lightning." "Rock
Around the Clock" is number
33 in England followed by
"Peggy Sue" at 35 and Eddie
Cochrane's great "Summer-
time' Blues" at 41. It's ru-
mored that the next Beatles'
album may be almost exclu-
sively hrd rock.
Speaking of The Beatles,
Queen Elizabeth asked them to
perform for her and they re-
fused, saying they no longer
performed live, thank you.
Who's number one?
* * *
Davy Jones is NOT going
steady with Sally Fields, con-
trary to what you might have.
read in some yechy magazine.
S* *
The Second Annual Monter-
ey Pop Festival is on again
after Lou Adler sweet-talked
the good citizens of Monter-
ey and put up an astronomical
sun to guarantee such things
as litter control, lots of cops,
supervision, etc.
The Candymen, a group that
achieved national prominence
because they performed the en-
tire '"Sgt. epper" album live.
have added "I Am the Walrus"
to their repertoire.
BEATLE STUMPER FOR
THE DAY: Who played lead
guitar on "Ticket to Ride?"
Call 764-0555 and ask fbr either
half of the Funn couple, Sherri
or Suzy, for the answer.

voluntarily next fall
(Continued from Page 1) but were granting the privilege
change it will be the second major anyway." ,The other eleven ex-
reform in University Housing this pressed "complete disagreement
year. In January, the Regents ac- with the experimental policy,"
cepted a proposal from the Board Cutler said.
of Governors of Iesidence Halls Cutler reported to the Regents
that freshman women with par- that "staff members in the res-
ental permission be excused from idence halls indicate the policy is
curfew and that individual hous- working successfully."
ing units be permitted' to establish , On visitation display, Cutler re-
their own policy on visitation by ported that out of 22 men's res-
members of the opposite sex in idence units, nine voted to permit
dorm rooms. ' 24-hour-a-day visitation, There
The results of those policy were no houses voting to permit
changes were made available by no visitation:
Cutler recently. Of 1,734 fresh- Of 18 women's housesrespond-
men women in University housing, ing, Cutler said, only three ap-
1,341 obtained permission to have proved unlimited visitation and'
no curfew, 116 parents denied per- two permitted no visitation. Most
mission and 277 parents failed to of the remaining thirteen allowed

continue picket lines

By The Associated Press t
Operato "s in 23 of Michigan'
Bell's 39 state exchanges re-
mained off the job yesterday de-
spite recommendations from their
national leadership that they re-
turn to work.
National officials of the Com-
munication Workers of America
(CWA) met with representatives
of Michigan units in Lansing
Monday to urge a return to work.
Michigan CWA workers had re-
jected a new contract offer
which grants nearly 20 per cent
increases in benefits to all Bell
system employes.
A Bell spokesman said seven
offices were struck in Detroit as
well as in Ann Arbor and 13
other Michigan cities. Pickets areI

dent of CWA Local 4011. The In-
ternational Union of the CWA in-
structed the Ann Arbor locals to
return to work Monday, Contin-
ued picketing, it% warned, "would
be in violation of their interna-
tional constitution."
However. Chase said, it is up
to Michigan Bell to settle with
the picketing Local 4090 (tele-
phone installers) and "when the
pickets are removed Local 4011
will return to work."
Walter Schnaar, CWA district
vice president for Michigan, Ohio
and part of Kentucky, recom-
mended in Lansing Monday night
that locals remove pickets, go
back to work. and re-enter nego-
tiations.

respondd. visitation every Friday and Satur- Western Electric employes at all Loc a l400was rejected nyDetroit
Local 400as wellte as Dnetrbort
He said he had received 26 let- day evening, he explained. offices except those in Mount Local 400. as wellt a cal400r
ters from parents commenting on "The climate and ease of ad- Clemens, Flint, and 'Royal Oak. wlocl 4 Ine picetigLoday 4and
the policy change§. "Seven ofm Telephone workers in Ann Ar- h continue picketing today and
these Applauded the decision,"'he ministration in the residence halls Telephon orersn k A nt A as scheduled a meeting for to-
hasenausanilydmrve,,o will not return to work until morrow at 10:00 a.m. to decide oni
said, and "seven indicated that has been substantially improved, all picket lines are withdrawn ex- r at
they did not agree with the policy Cutler told the Regents, plained Frederick Chase presi- further action.
a id ard orkey sai nothing nap-
pened at the Lansing meeting to
change the situation.
,, L 0 F I CThe striking unions imclude
DAIlY "'. riI AL BULLETIN
""" : . _6,500 wor'kers. Local 4000 is the
largest of these consisting of 5,300
S,...,,..:Y.:::..1 .....".: , .. .::",..::.:.:.'. ...' mem bers. Ann Ardor local 4090
The Daily Official Oulietin is an Placement Services available in the zational Behavior. Psychology or Soc only has 30 members in the area
official pblication of the Univer- summer do not include interviewing, and related flds., some work exper but includes another 1,000 in the
sit of ichigan for which The however company materials, director and interest in study or organiz. be- rest of the state. Local 4011 has
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- les, and current listings of- openings havior. 50'mmes
ial responsibility. Notices should be sent us are available for browsing lalostal Programmer,man, 500 members.
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to Please inform us as to any address co a H - programmin, mys According to one CWA official
Room 3564 Admiilstration Bldg. changes. If you, got a ,job, report it to temsu Anesot, ma. n, srvrammpings,-h rbe nrtfigtepo
before 2 4.m. of the day preceding us so we may remove your ame sfromtemsrAnwlyst. orprogrammning s eth problem in ratifying the pro-
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday the active files, also report any offers exper. in cyst. or programming, BA posed contract was that there
for Saturday and Sunday. General you did not accept, for statistical pur- degree. Communications, man orwo-
Notices may be published a maxi- poses, If you are still seeking a posi- dence coordination iffce supv.rexper everyone to vote.
mum of tw*o times on request; Dlay tibn,,and either have received your de- deie . colg.,orepn vryetoe"
Calendar items appear only once. gree in April, or will in June or Aug-desired A new ratification vote by all
Student organifation notices are ust, please let us ,know, so we may Kraft Foods, Chicago, 7n. - Person- 18,000 members of the Michigan
not accepted for publication. 'For best assist you in. your search. Current nel Manager Trainee, in all areas of CWA is expected. Results from
more information call 764-9270. openings will be posted in the Daily a large personnel operation will take this vote are to be in by May 19.
Official Bulletin as usual, monthly lists over personnel management functions
WEDNESDAY, MAY 8 of openings'for alumni, 1., experieIcedi of one '6f 5 plants when need arises, CWA officials expect approval of
personnel, or those with degrees, are man, BSA or degree with course work the contract with the new vote.
mailed, and current listings are avail- in personnel or industrial relations, up In the other 16 exchanges of
av le r able to degree candidates, to 1 year exper., request mailitary serv-
Morningr- ____-Mricegnot be pending. Michigan Bell normal work has
Advanced- Fire School I or :am. Opportunities for Further Study and .etroit Diesel Divislon, General Mo- resumed. Employment is report-
.Session, Civil Defense Center, 8:30 a Financial Aid, call,764-4760 for further tors Corporation, Detroit. Mich. - Edi- ed to be at full strength. The
Elements of Outdoor- Recreation information. tor, journalist with knowl. and exper. struck areas, however, report a.
Planning - Morning Session, Michigan Cooperstown Graduate Programs, in all phases to set up an employee higher demand for operator as-
Union, 8:30 a.m. joint state University College at One- newspaper for plant with 600 em- s
tonta and New York State HistoricalI ployees, man or woman, BA Journ.,SistanCethan at any previous
etAssociation, Cooperstown, N.Y. -'Pro-- some exper. time in the phone strike.
6 Hnera Notces grms n IHistory Museum Trii -'. -----
American Folk Culture, and a combin-
Botany Seminar: Co-sponsored with ation of these. Two semesters andV one 6}NATIONAL 8eNeRnA CORtPORATION
the Departments of Zoology and Hu summer, 36 credits requiredrMuseum 6t- onoxeEASTERN Tl-eaTreS
manOeneticss Dr. B. J. McCarthy, Uni- trng. program requIres 2 mn. -apn GE Mon.-Fri.
versity of Washington, 'Evolution Ex- ticeship, unless oandldate h s previous GREAT F VILLE Mn.Fr
amn* TroghGeetcHomologies,"exper. W Ep. 7MAL D.79130 ~:00-9:20
Thurs., May 9, 4:15. p~m., 1139 Nat.' eEper. No*MAPL7:00-9:20300
Si. Bd goU.S.' Department of Agriculture Grad-
Sci Blg. _____uate School, Wash., D.:C,.Announce-
ments of summer sessions, evening SAT.-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:20 SUN.-1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:20
PlAF PntENT courses, and fail 67-68. Graduate, Un-
dergraduate, and non-academic courses.
BUI;EAU OLF APPOINTMENTS___
---_ _- I

Glenn Gould: Not for purists ..

By R. A.EARI
If you are a student build-
ing a record collection by ac-
quiring:the basic repertoire,
then you probably won't want
it. If you are a purist, anxious
for musical authenticity and
skeptical of 'second-hand com-
positions, you don't want it
either. If you are afraid that
your academic friends will
laugh at you when they find it
hidden away in your collection,
then you had,better steer clear
of' it too. But, be forewarned;,
you -will be missing one of the
most exciting, unusual, and
satisfying piano records of the
year.
The dubious disc in question
is Franz Liszt's piano Ftrans-
cription of Beethoven's Fifth
Symphony, performed by 'that
p e r v e r s e Canadian genius,
Glenn Gould, ,Surprises are
many in this new Columbia re-
cording (MS17095), and not the
least one is that the piece
works at all. Many .of Liszt's
transcriptions - his "Oper-
atic and Dramatic Fantasies"
--were strange affairs, half
original, half. banal, meant
mostly to'sho -up his techni-
cal prowess. Such transcrip-
tions also served to introduce
many works to a wider audi-
ence which could not attend
operatic galas. -

effects, pays tribute not only
to Liszt's knowledge of the p1-
ano but also to the skill, in-
genuity, and "chutzpah" of Mr.
Gould. From the same piano
with which he delicately clari-
fied the structures of Bach, he
evokes an enormous sound,,
thoroughly contiolled, never
rambling,- ,,always infinitely
shading tonal color with an ear
to the orchestra. The andante
is most lovely, and the ere-
scendo entrance to the final al-
legro breathtaking in its build-
up and control. A great new
Beethoven sonata has been
added to the repertoire, though
it is doubtful that many pian-
ists will accept, lest tackle it.
Glenn Gould has said'that the
only reason to record is to do
something different. His new
recording of the five early Mo-
zart sonatas (K. 279-283) cer-'
tainly does, just that; it is an
intriguing, ghastly affair.w
To make love takes: ,some
time; rape is. a fast' job, and
Gould proceeds to rape these
early sonatas'of much of their
'feeling, sensitivity, and content.
It is one thing to eschew senti-
mentality but another thing to
wear intellectual blindIers. There
are moments of quiet deli-
cacy and, of course, a splendid
revelation of structure, and in
these moments one is complete-
ly won over. At other ,times,
Gould coldly rips through the.
score.-

Take, for example; the Son-
ata No. 5, K. 283. A good, Ro-
mantic pianist like Novaes
takes nineteen minutes to play,
it; Gould takes eight! All of
the feeling which Novaes puts
in the space between notes,
Gould compresses out. No ru-
bato for this young man. Yet,
when all is said, the record
(MS 7097) is still not one I
,would trade away too readily,
for Glenn Gould casts an aura
as no other pianist today.
Columbia has promoted their
new presentation of Brahms
Piano Concerto No. 2, with
Andre Watts and Leonard
Bernstein, to their full PR ca-
pacity. With the record (MS,
7134) came a little disc puri-
porting to be a "conversation"
between Bernstein and Watts.
On it Maestro Bernstein speaks
and Watts adds "Right" or
"Yes" or "Uh-hull."
Their musical partnership
proves to 'something similar. It
is Bernstein's conception of the
work which prevails - every
forte an emotional peak, pushy
tempos and quixotic ritardan-
dos, heavy all-out lyricism --
into which Watts pours his pro-
digious talents, power, and
technique. When passion seems
so premeditated, however, it
loses its power to convince.
Thus,. .despite the tempest
brewed up here, there are more
moving pgrformances to be had,
the Rich er/Leinsdorf for one.

3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION ,
4 ,.
O RGAN 1iZAT ION
NOTICES
Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially
recognized and registered student -
organizations only. Forms are
available in room 1011 SAB,.
'* * * .
Bach Club Meeting., Wed., May 8,
8:00 pm., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Program': a talk by John Harvith on
"Plagiarism." For furthe' information
please call 769-2922 and/or 769-2750.

Placement Openings, call 764-7460 for
further information.
Catayrtic Dow, Titusville, Fla. -
,NASA contractor seeking degreeA en-
gineer, Quality Engineer in Reliability
and Quality Assurance Department,
Welding engrg., or metallurgical engrg,,
member in one or more related, profes,
sional societies (AWS, NTS, AMS, ste.
Shop or fabrication exper.
Ella Sharp Museum, Jackson, Mth.=
Museum Cuirator, work with Director
In programming new exhibit bldgs.
Pow under construction, restoration
of several bldgs. on Museum grounds.
BA hist. or education, knowl. of an-
tiques and liking for working with
people,
Curtis-Wright Corporation,rWood-
Ridge, N.Y. -- Position, in" Personnel-
Group, under Manager, Personnel De-
velopment, Management Development
Specialist position. Degree in Organi-

WINNER TWQ ACADEMY AWARDS
BEST ACTRESS-KATHARINE HEPBURN
BEST SCREEN PLAY

4

COLUMBIA PICTURES preseria
Stanley Kramer
producton
Spencer' Sidney
TRACY POITIER
Katharine

* coming
to dinner
TECHNICOLORi f

U

------------

JF

DIAL
5-6290

/ '~i~~

Today i
LADIES' DAY
Shows at 1, 3,
5, 7, 9 P.M.

In the Beethoven transcrip-
tion, however, Liszt strove not
e for original embellishing varia-
tions, but a true orchestral ver-
isimilitude. You may laugh at
the opening well-worn bars,
but you will also "slowly be
drawn into amazement at h~ow
well the piano captures the
weight and the instrumental
color -of the orchestral score,
amazement at the massive for-
tes and the "woodwind" pianis-
simo interplays, amazement
simply at how easily it be-
comes to hear, or to recollect,
the orchestral sounds.
That the transcription stands
up on its' own right, and'
emerges not merely -as a bas-
tard, ersatz conglomeration of

A.-

'I

"'110 111 1111111111111, m
r-

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-SATURDAY REVIEW
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-N.Y: DAILY NEWS
SANDY DENNIS KEIR DULLEA
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THE
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NO 2-6264 "NOBODY'S PERFECT"
Starts TOMORROW *
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FRIDAY: "Cool Hand Luke" and "Wait Until Dark"
STARTS TOMORROW-7:00 & 9;05
"A MOST EXTRAORDINARY FILM!"
-NEW YORK TIMES
ONE OF THE THE

i

S'2001 A Space Odyssey,' a fantastic movie
about man's future! An unprecedented psy-
chedelic roller coaster of an experience that
few viewers are likely to get over!' 'I9ozine
'Kubrick's special effects border on the mi-
raculous-a quantum leap in quality over ny
other science fiction film ever made!"~M ,*zine
"in its sptce-travel special effects it is an un-
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THE MANY
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