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July 18, 1968 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1968-07-18

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Pace Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 18, 1968

.,,,.I

'NO PLACE FOR SHOTMAKING
Elder statesman Snead blames problems On

t architects

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (P)-Sam
Snead, shooting for his fourth
PGA title here this week at the
age of 56, says golf is not much
fun; any more-the architects have
made it a drag.
"There no longer is any place
for shotmaking," the hillbilly styl-
ist added Tuesday as he took a
practice swing around the 7,896,-
yard Pecan Valley Country Club
Course with Open Champion Lee
Trevino. "It's all grunt and groan.
"Every course now has to be
more than 1,000 yards. It's not
unusual any more to have 263-
yard par three holes dead into the
wind or 480-yard par fours uphill.
"The fairways are so narrow
you can still have a perfect shot
and not have a chance for the
green, and then you can lose a
ball in the rough a foot off the
fairway."
Slammin' Samnmy-as he was
affectionately called back in the

1940s and 1950s-is the elder
statesman of the 168 teaching and
tournament pros who tee off
Thursday in the 50th professional
golfers association championship.
He isn't taken lightly by his
rivals, not even those half his age.
His swing is the silkiest in the
game, a model fd rthe youngsters.
His problems, lie ,other of the
aging, is on the greens and Sam
has tried everything from cro-
quet-style now outlawed to side-
saddle and orthodox.
sports,
NIGHT EDITOR:.
PHIL BROWN

He recaptured some of his old
form last week to get second mo-
ney in the Milwaukee Open, won I
by young Dave Stockton.
"Like all courses, this one is,
built for the hitter," Sam said.
"You just crank up and-wham-
mo. That's the name of the game
now.
" "You have to favor hig hitters
such as Jack Nicklaus, Tom Weis-
kopf and Bobby Nichols, but don't
count out this little guy."
fHe pointed to Trevino, the
Mexican-American from El Paso
and Dallos who won the Open at
Rochester, N.Y. last month.
"He keeps the ball in play. He's
great around the greens." .
Snead had most of his hair and
very little of his present paunch
when he won his first PGA in
1942 when the event was match
play. He. won again in 1949 and
1951. He was xunner-up ,in 1938
and 1940.

Trevino has lost 12

pounds,

much of it.around his middle, but
none of his brashness since he
played the role of rollicking star
at Oak Hill.
"This is my country," the little
Mexican-American said. "Man,
I'm so keyed .up I want to jump
right out of my skin."
Like Snead, Trevino just toyed
around the course, hitting two
and three balls on some holes.
"The course plays long, and
you've got to be straight," Trevino
said, "but I life it. The tighter
the fairways, the heavier the
rough, the better it is for me. I
think the rough ought to be up
to your knees."
Three former champions-Vic,
Ghezzi, Jack Burke and Chick
Harbert-withdrew, but 17 men
who have won this title were left
in the field.
Trevino is one of seven Open
winners in the field, which in-
cludes Nicklaus, Bill Casper and

Arnold Palmer, just back from the
bone-chilling winds and gorse of A
Old Carnoustie in Scotland.
South Africa's Gary Player, who
won there last week, isn't entered.
Neither is Roberto de Vincenzo of
Argentina, the 1967 British win-
ner.
Palmer, the jet-planing' mil-
lionaire, played nine holes in the M
morning, flew to Vail, Colo., to
attend a graduatiph at one of his
golf-schools and then planned to
fly back for another nine before
dark.
Defending champion Don Jan-
uary, a Texan accustomed to the
intense heat anid courses that fa-
vor the pitch-and-run, said he
believed those' players who com-
peted in Britain last week would
be severely handicapped.
"Changing to different teiper-
aturps, the bigger ball and the
five-hour time difference-I just
don't see how they can do it," he A
said.

U. S. OPEN WINNER Lee Trevino tours the Peach Valley Country Club course in San Antonio,;
Texas, previous to today's start of the PGA. With Trevino are 285 orphans, his guests for a day
in the country. Trevino is considered one of the tournament's favorites because of his local
popularity.

,4

McLain

gets

18th;

Colavito

ra

Tiger hurler leads majors;
headed for 30-win season

By The Associated
OAKLAND - Denn
the Detroit Tigers sa
think about winning
until he has won 29.
He lifted his rec
season to 18-2 with
hitter Tuesday night
out the Oakland A
McLain tried - a:
to get his 18th victory
1 last season. The f
ably cost the Tigerst
The victory Tuesday
McLain the first m
to reach the 18-win:
campaign, and snapr
game Tiger losing sr
Last year, he had 1
he dislocated his toes
ber 17 in a mishapf
didn't pitch again un
game of the season-
whew the Tigers need
over California to tie
force a pennant play
Now McLain will ea
previous best win tot
could become the fi
winner since DizzyI
the trick in 1934 - a
the Tigers in the Wo
McLain hasn't lost
9, when the Indians1
"If I'm fortunate er
29 games, then I'll st
about winning 30,"1
"Right now, all I ,
help the Tigers win t
he added. '
McLain is three day
30-win pace of Lefty
last American Leagu
win that many in a s

d Press
iy McLain of
ys he won't
g 30 games
ord for the
an eight-
as he shut
thletics 4-0.
nd failed -
y on October
'ailure prob-
the pennant.
y night made
.ajor leaguer
mark of the
ed a three-

won his 18th game on July 13,
1931, and finished with a 31-4
record.
Catcher Bill Freehan of the
Tigers credited McLain's success
to his ability to get out of trouble.
McLain had two runners on in
the first inning but escaped with
a double play. .
In the sixth he struck out Oak-
land's home run leader, Reggie
Jackson, with two men on.
Throwing fastballs, curves, slid-
ers and a few changeups, he didn't
walk a batter.
"When I have my control I'll

I--Associated Press
TIGER HURLER DENNY McLAIN bears down with a grimace
on his way to victory number 18 against the Oakland A's last
night. McLain took the win, 4-0, raising his season mark to
18-2, easily the best in the majors. The Bengal righty is con-
sidered a prime prospect to become the majors' first 30-game
winner since Dizzy Dean turned the trick in 1934.

ONE MORE WEEK:

-N.---

IM, softballclimaxapproa c

Pel. give any team a battle," McLain
7 wins when said.
on Septem- Johnny Sain, Tiger pitching
at home. He coach, taught McLain the slider
itil the final because Denny felt he needed an-
- Oct. 1 - other pitch.
led a victory "He tried to teach it to me last
Boston, and year but I'm a slow learner and
yoff. ' didn't catch on until this sea-
isily pass his son," McLain said.
al of 20 and "There are 24 other players and
rst 30-game the coaches who are responsible
Dean turned for my success," he said when
nd then beat asked if Sain was most respon-
rid Series. sible for his fine year.
since June Detroit got a quick lead with
beat him. an unearned run in the first
nough to win against, loser Chuck Dobson, '79.
tart thinking The Tigers scored again in the
McLain said. second on singles by Willie Hor-
vant to do is ton and Tom Matchick and a
he pennant," walk.
They added a third run in the
ys behind the fourth on Al Kaline's fifth homer.
y Grove, the A double by Jim 'Northrup, a
e pitcher to walk and Freehan's single ac-
eason. Grove counted for the Tigers' final run.
Pasarell gains
Te s quarters in clay
bets trail the court tourney
ie 1 (nature MILWAUKEE, Wis. W) - See-
and Chem- ond-seeded Charles Pasarell of
Firebrewers'
cooked way Puerto Rico, in trouble for the
third straight day, advanced to
wen innings, the quarter-fina'ls of the National
n rule in ef- Clay Courts Tennis Championship
vides for a yesterday with a 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 vi-
ed when one tory over unseeded George See-
iy 15 or more wagen of Bayside, N.Y.
n inning. Jaime Fillol of Chile, second
oked Monday seeded foreign entry, was elimin-
truders side- ated, 6-3, 6-3 by Marty Riessen
ies 16-1 in of Evanston, Ill., seeded No. 5
ther Monday among domestic players.
usiness Pro- Canada's Mike Belkin, the top
Sigma Phi, foreign seed, hung on for a 6-4,
Campus Cor- 5-7, 9-7 victory over Bob Lutz of
stry 12-11 in Los Angeles.
r; Psych. 'B' Clark Graebner of New York,
ers '1' team seeded No. 4, took Australian Al-
rs' tying run Ian Stone, 6-4, 6-3. Jim Osborne
the plate to of Honolulu, eighth seeded do-
mestic player, defeated Peter Van
y contest, the Lingen of South Africa, 6-4, 6-4.
r Ed., 20-18, Van Lingen was the No. 4 foreign

xDetroit 57 32 .640
Baltimore 49 38 .563
iCleveland 51 41 .554
Boston 46 41 .5291
xCalifornia 42 46 .4771
'Minnesota 14' 46 .4771
xOakland 42 46 .477
New York 41 46 .4711
Chicago 38 48 .4421
Washington 31 55 .3602
x-Late game notsincluded.
Yesterday's Games
Washington 2, New York 1
Chicago 1, Baltimore 0
Boston 6, Minnesota 5
Detroit at Oakland ",inc.
Cleveland ataCalifornia, ine.
Today's Games
Detroit at Oakland
Boston at Minnesota
Baltimore at Chicago
Washington at New York, night
Only games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

ROCKY COLAVITO

psHR
Blast sparks
Yankee debut
NEW YORK (/P) - Rocky Cola-
vito, a Yankee Stadium auto-
graph hound as a teen-ager, put
his own mark on an American
League baseball Tuesday night
and gave himself a nice home-
coming present.
The veteran outfielder, who'll
be 35 next month, made his de-
but with the New York Yankees,
who signed him as a free agent
Monday,. and walloped a three-
run homer for the first runs in a
4-0 triumph over Washington in
the opener of a twi-night double-
header.
Colavito sat out the nightcap,
which the Yankees also won, 4-3,
on Joe Pepitone's two-run homer.
"It was just, great, terrific,"
Colavito said. "It was a special
nom .run and gave me a big
boost._r
"I used to live about a mile
over the left-field fence," contin-
ued Colavito, who was born and
raised in the Bronx. "I waited !
outside this stadium for auto-
graphs many a time both before,
and after games. As a laid I al-
ways wanted to be a Yankee.",
Colavito connected on his sec-r
ond trip to the plate in the fifth
inning of a scoreless game after
Pepitone and Andy Kosco . had'
singled.
Joe. Coleman, the Washington
pitcher, quickly got two strikes
on the Rock: With the count 3-2,
Colavito fouled off six pitches be-
fore drilling the ball deep into
the left field seats.
"He made some good pitches,
that son - of - a - gun," Colavito
said. "I had batting practice that
one time up. I got a great recep-
tion in the dugout. I don't think
anyone missed me.".
The homer was the 370th of
his career and tied him with Gil
Hodges for 15th place on the, all-
time home run list.
The Yanks signed him after
the Los Angeles Dodgers, for.
whom he hit .204 with only three
homers, released him.'
Colavito spurned Yankees as a
youth to sign with Cleveland,
which offered $1,500 more. He
played with the Indians, Tigers,
Athletics, W h i t e Sox and
Dodgers.'
"No, I wasn't nervous," he said.
"I've been here so many times
on the other side, you know. I
didn't even go to the wrong club-
house. I knew from chasing auto-
graphs years ago which side of
the stadium the Yanks were on."

GB
7
7 t
19
14,
14
141,4
15
17
241!
GB
10
12
14
15
17
18
18

By PHIL BROWN .I
With the summer half-term
less than a month old, the in-
tramural softball program is
quickly drawing to a close.
'he 20 teams which make up
the five leagues in the progran
have only one more week of comn-
petition remaining before tourna-
ment action wraps up the sum-
I-M Scores
LEAGUE I

Associated Press
Showing them hoW... .
Corporal John Henderson,. Detroit Lion flanker in civilian life,
draws a bow with a group df Detroit youngsters during the Michi-
gan National Guard Boys' Camp. The camp, believed the first
of its kind in the nation, is aimed at improving relations be-
tween the Guard and inner-city youths following the disastrous
race riots of last summer.

Intruders
Hurricanes
Business Prophets
Delta Sigma Phi
LEAGUE a2
Firebrewers '1'
Psychology 'B'
Campus Corners
Chemistry
LEAGUE 3
Jolly Green Giants
NEs
Psychology 'A'
Social Psychology
LEAGUE 4
Bio-engineering
Blo-chemistry
Cooley Lab
Firebrewers '2'
LEAD UES5

W
1
0
W
2
. I
1
w
1
Y
Ir
1J
1

1.
1
L
2
4
I
1
1
1
I.
1:
fl
fl

mer campaign.
"We play a regular round-
robin to determine places in theE
leagues," says Lou Jankowski,I
whio is in charge of 'the opera-
tion
"One league plays each night,
with two playing on Tuesdays;
this ends next week. Then we
start our tournament on July 29,
with the second round on July 31.
The finals will be played on
August 5."
The five leagues are made up
entirely of independent teams,
formed by fraternities, college de-
partments, and various "inter-
ested groups."
The games are all under the
aegis of hired umpires, who call
the pitches and have full author-
ity over each contest. '
Among teams com peting are
the Hurricanes (from the Meteor-
ology Department) and the Jolly
Green Giants (Botany), as well
as such unlikely contenders as
the Firebrewers (two teams), the
Carlton Nads and the NEs (both
unexplained).
A glance at the leagues' stand-
ings can tell a lot about the
groups represented. Higher Edu-
cation, for instance, is mired in
last place in League 5 without a
win.
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!

The usiness Phop
Hurricanes in Leagu
conquers man again)
istry lags behind the
'1' team (the home-
is still the' best).
All games are se
with a special 15-run
fect. That rule pro
game to be terminat
team leads another b
runs at the end of a
" The rule was inv
might, when the In
lined the Hurrican
four frames. The o
contest saw the B
phets blank Delta
4-0.
Tuesday it was C
ners downing Chemi
a nine-inning thrille
edged the Firebrew
5-4, with the 'Brewe
being thrown out at
end the game.
In another Tuesday
Nads dumped Highe
in a defensive battle

St. Louis
Atlanta
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles'
New York
Houston

59
49
46
45
43
45
42
42
42
39

L
31
41
42
45
45
48
48
50
50
52

Pct.
.656
.544
.523
.500
.489
.484
.467
.457
.457
.429

Yesterday's Results
Houston 5, Atlanta 2
Cincinnati 7, Los Angeles 4
Pittsburgh 8-4, New York 2-5,
twi-night
Chicago 8-0, Philadelphia 4-8,
twi-night
San Francisco at St. Louis, rain
Today's Games
New York at Pittsburgh, night
Los Angeles at Cincinnati, night
Atlanta at Houston, night
San Francisco at St. Louis, night
Only games scheduled.

Automatic Slick .Shillt

,Cuyle
iHedwick due
for induction
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (F -
Joe Medwick, Leon "Goose" Gos-,
lin and the late Hazen "'iki"
Cuyler will be inducted formally
into baseball's Hall of Fame Mon-
day.
,T'he members of the Baseball
Writers Association of America
voted Medwick into the Hall Jan.
23, the last time he would have,
been eligible before passing into
the jurisdiction of the veterans
group. Goslin and Cuyler were#
picked June 28 by the special 12-
man veterans' committee.

ATTENTION
FRESH MEN
Reserve your
textbooks' NOW
Pick them up when you
return for fall classes.
NO CASH REQUIllED-hall
advance orders guarariteed.
Save up to 1/3 on
Folletts used books.
Drop in or mail
your reservation card to
FOLLETTS
A 22 S. Stot'i St.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

. i
__-- -

seed.

I.

W L
Carlton Nads 1 0
Gas Lighters 1 0
Physiology I 1
Higher Education ' 0 2
Monday's Result,
Intruders 16,Iurricanes I
Business Prophets 4, Delta Sigroa

COPE FOR SHERIFF
HELP RESTORE PRIDE
IN THE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Please make your check payable to Copi for Sheriff
and send it to R.Souve, Treasurer, 1315 Cam-
bridge, Ann Arbor.

SYSTRONIC.S1, INC.
JOIN THE LEADER IN PROGRAMMABLE ;
VIDEO TERMINAL SYSTEMS!
Ann Arbor's rapidly expanding manufacturer of programmable
video terminal systems; seeks qualified individuals to fill openings
in the following areas:
PROGRAMMING-DIGITAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
PROGRAMMER - EXPERIENCED
Qualified programmer experienced in assembler language or ma-
chine language for small or medium-sized computers. Must be
inteested in shortwave development (Executivp Routines, Inter-
facing,. Compilers) for. communications terminals-experience in
microprogramming associated with small processors; for terminal
control also desired.
EXECUTIVE PROGRAMMER
Message switching applications-expeienced in data communica-
tions, store and forward switching centers and digital data trans-
mission.
rflr;ITAI CVCTFA C ,IMPIPP.._PYPPIElNCF

ii

After to these many years our humble
little bug hqs gone automhatic.
Gone is the clutch.
Gone is the wifely whine, "It's cute, but
I can't drive it."-
Gone isan era fVokswq edom.$n
And in its place?
A Volkswagen you CQn drie oil over
town without shifting.
- Only on, the highway db you shift.
Qnce. (This is an economymove.Which,
after all, is still the name of the ,ame.)
But you do have c choice in the matter,
you can drive it the easy way (described
above), Or you can start out in low and
take it through the gears like a regular

Phi 0 iW P vvW W
Tuesday's Results * NO WAITING
Campus Corners 12, Chemistry 11, 7 BARBERS
9 innings
Carlton Nads 20, Higher Education 18 * OPEN 6 DAYS
Psychology 'B' 5, Firebrewers '1' 4 B b
Yesterday's Results flcanr s
Social Psychology 8, Psychology 'A' 6 TeD clBr r
NEs 11, Jolly Green Giants 6 Near Michigan Theatre
Gas Lighters 15, Physiology 5

NEW POT TTCS

I

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