100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 04, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday. May

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wave of relief rolls over world;
stock market reacts with surge

poetry and prose

'S------ ~ --~,-urgeocn.geqneral site

Overflow: Uneven spirit dangers of Mace use

By The Associated Press 1
A wave of relief rolled over
most world capitals yesterday at
the agreement by American and
North Vietnamese leaders to begin
preliminary peace talks in Paris
next week.
But in hailing the news, govern-
ments tempered their relief with
a certain reserve. It reflected
their awareness that a diplomatic
negotiation as grim and relentless

as the Vietnam war itself may lie Ifished with a slight gain. Trading

ahead.
British Prime Minister Harold
Wilson's government led the way
with a declaration expressing hope
that the Paris exchanges will lead
"as soon as possible to a just and
honorable peace."
In New York the stock market
shot ahead strongly on news that
peace talks would be held in Paris
but then lost its steam and fin-

Paris talks preliminary
to substantial negotiations

(Oontinued from Page 1)
"That the United States would
stop its bombardment of North
Vietnam when that would lead
promptly to productive discus-
sions and that we would assume
that North Vietnam would not
take military advantage of our.
restraint."
The key word in this formula
would seem to be "productive"-
and the United States can hardly
tell whether or not the Paris talks
will be productive until after the
diplomats sit down together.
Fortifying this impression is
Johnson's caution that the U.S.
North Vietnam agreement to meet
in Paris "is only a very first step,
and there are many, many hazards
and difficulties ,ahead."
Roving Ambassador W. Averell
Harriman and his assistant, Cyrusz

W. Vance will meet in Paris with
a former foreign minister for
North Vietnam, 55-year-old Xuan
Thuy-pronounced Foon Twee.
Administration strategists saw
the record on Paris as vindication
of Johnson's stedfastness against
a heavy Communist campaign in
favor of Warsaw. Some prominent
U.S. critics of Johnson's policy also
had urged him to accept Warsaw.
There was' also some cautious
encouragenent in administration
circles from the wording of the
North Vietnamese announcement.
In their April 3 agreement to
meet with U.S. representatives, the
North Vietnamese had spoken only
of a readiness for a "contact",in
order to determine whether the
Americans would halt i the U.S.
bombing of North Vietnam and,
other acts of war so that talks
may start."

was very heavy.
The Dow Jones averagef of 30
industrial stocks closed with a
gain of 1.16 points at 919.21 after
having been up 11.91 points dur-
ing the morning.
Trading volume reached 17.99
million shares, third highest in
the history of the New York Stock
Exchange. The first hour volume
of 6.32 million shares equalled the
record for the period set last
April 3.
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy said in
Indiana that he is pleased the
United States and North Vietnam
have agreed on a site for peace
talks, but the time it took "indi-
cates the difficulty we still face"
in coming to terms to end the
fighting.
He expressed hope that an in-
ternational force might be placed
in Vietnam to supervise a cease
fire "and stop the killing as soon
as possible."
Richard M. Nixon described'
Hanoi's agreement to talk peace
at Paris as only the first of many
steps toward peace.
He also renewed his call for a
moratorium by presidential can-
didates on the Vietnam peace
moves, warning that any candi-
date who proposes concessions
"can destroy the hopes for peace
with a mouthful of his words."
The Soviet government was in-
itially silent. Tass, their official
news agency, reported without
comment the separate Hanoi and
Washington statements announc-
ing agreement to the meeting.

By MAURICE JAY
Arriving- at a just estimate of
the third issue of Overflow is not
an easy matter. The magazine in-
cludeg in its scope such varied
material that little in the way of
a coherent overall impression
comes across on first reading. Be-
side this, the material is marked-
ly uneven in quality.
Given these two kinds of vari-
ety, it would be easy to come out
confused and take a rather dim
view of the whole thing. In fact,
it would be a little too easy, and
one cannot long indulge the fatu-
ous self-satisfaction of being dis-
dainful. Snatches of raucous hu-
mor and open indications of the
magazine's free wheeling inclu-
siveness will soon show the read-
er by how much he misses the'
spirit and point of the whole pro-
duction.
If, with one easy attitude thus
denied him, the reader reverses
direction and tries again, he will
find a number of things to be
pleased about. Two of them are
poems by Erick Strayer. Despite
the weakness of "Painted Madly
Not Badly," the poem about Van
Gogh recreates in language and
image a strong sensory analogy
with that painter's particular
frenzy. The more restrainedlan-
guage of "I Asked the Aborigine"
delivers more because of that con-
trol.
Karen Knorp's "Blues III"' em-
bodies its careful, mildly poign-
ant irony with a similar direct-
ness and simplicity.
Perhaps the worst poem In the
magazine is "Good Ole Charlie"

by Jeffrey Armstrong. Stronger "Legal Hellin' " fails to crystal-
ironies and a more clearly defined ize the major irony or insight
persona are needed to give such needed in order to bring a sense
simple and repetitious language of form and significance to that
any effect at all and the last line much material.
is worse even than mere lack of A few words or lines isolated:
effect. It almost seems as if the on a page in the manner of an
author thought the shock value of epigraph or an anonymous haiku
"son-of-a-bitch," repeated sever- are useddto great effect on pages
al times, would carry the whole 18, 39, and 48. Their freshness
poem, and pure evocativeness could be
'Consider the Bees''by Bruce enhanced still more by a more
E. Nilsson has the unevenness of purposeful placement, in clearer
the magazine's poetry embodied in contrast or complementarity with
one work. The simplicity of Part the more substantial works.
Four could have an authoritative The humorous sketch on page
impact, depending on the, force- 35 is less effective. The campy
fulness of what goes before. Part parody on "A Book of the Month"
One gives a quick, lively, some- and the more subtle and sophisti-
what comic sketch of differing cated list of "The Ten Great'
opinions. Part Two is a bit por- Wines" round out the variety of
tentous perhaps, its one line iso- ironic tones and miscellaneous!
lated as it. is. But Part Three forms. But they are secondary
with its wordiness and overdone works, and it is easy, if somewhat
alliterations is downright distress- unfair, to let them slip into the
ing. The persona in "Cogito" is ranks of the few ineffective works
a little too complacent about his that create the impression of un-
faults for the ironies to be brought evenness.
to maximum sharpness. And with No evaluation would be com-
these few sketchy remarks I will plete without a mention of the
leave to the reader the stimulat- I magazine's rich visual content,
ing task of evaluating the poetry especially as the variety of styles
more carefully. here is also a concrete indication
None of the short stories are of the kind of inclusiveness aimed
completely satisfying, but two of at in -the literary sphere. For hu-
them are very nearly so. The first, mor there is Fran Konapek's hip-i
part of Karen Knorp's "The Re- po covered with slogans and graf-
treat" shows the threat of a fiti. Then there are the sensitive
strange, irrational disintegration lines of Edward Busseff's draw-
in both the auto and Caroline's ings, several moody photographs,
emotional state. The section con- the carefully detailed r alism of
cerning the regressive trance, the girl and her doll by Melissa
however, is too drawn out and not Dikeman, and the striking grotes-
as closely related to the objective querie of a 'head by Janet E.
reality of the first half as it could Taylor.
be. The story translated from the Freshness, liveliness, and vane-
Russian has an engaging poignan- ty are, like other words, easily in-
cy and folksy quality, but the voked, and they do not justify all
simplicity tends to become a bit the works included in this issue
mawkish and insubstantial in the of Overflow. But freshness, live-
closing lines.I liness, and variety it still does
Despite the local color and the have in ample measure, and these
interest of Leavy's character, the are qualities which we need to
superficial wordplay at the end of recognize and appreciate.

(Continued from Page 1) 1 dinance Company, and are having
Rowry regarding amelioration of the University analyze only that
brand lc-omnt eainad of Mace. Other police de-
e a partments have requested copies
of disciplinary action to bettaken of the report when it is completed.
against officers charged with po- "It wouldn't be fair to the Uni-
lice brutality. Krasny disregarded' versity to give a blanket report on
the promises and has taken no ac- alltypes of Mace. Theranalysis
tion whatsoever on the matters. will not apply to any similar
"In the times we live in and products,'" he said. "The reports
the problems we face, we cannot are a good idea to clear the air
afford the luxury of an incompe- even though our Mace was given
tent chief of police," said Rowry.' a clean bill of health. There are
'This community is making its still some questions about long
own contribution to lawlessness term toxic effects that need to be
by standing by and allowing an ir- answered."
responsible and dishonest police Krasny added that some of the
force to continue to operate," he other Mace-like products may be
added. harmful to people and should be
A difficulty in determining the, taken off the market if studies
toxicity of Mace is that there are prove them to be dangerous.
many different riot control chem- Prof. Albert H. Wheeler of the
icals available under 'the generic Medical School and Michigan
name of Mace. Although similar NAACP president expressed con-
in effect, they all have different cern about what he termed "The
chemical compositions and vary- poor quality of the existing re-
ing reactions to the skin and search" on Mace. He said that in
eyes. According to Krasny, the order to be acceptable, much more
Ann Arbor police only used Mace intensive studies of the chemi-
manufactured by the General Or- cal's effects on humans is needed.

A

5th
GREAT
WEEK

FOX EASTERN T-EATRES
FOXH VILLBGE
375 No. MAPLE R0.-"7694300

Mon.-Fri.
7:00-9:20

10

SAT.-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:20 SUN.- 1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9 :2
WINNER TWO ACADEMY AWARDS
BEST ACTRESS--KATHARINE HEPBURN

.r - :h: . "... .. . 15. h . '. . . . . C.. .. "..Y.:::... . . . . . . .6 r r rr~ r+- , .h.... r"{:. .!S:..4...... .Y
1. ..". > r...J,.. :4... tA .h. h ~.' : h. P . ss. . .rf: "a "? . :. .. 'rsv. :. ? ;. * O.. *4:X**h.....~.V ....t.. .
DAILY OFFICIAL'BU'LLETIN
:.. . . ^.> .'r'i"}+l+SS "" FS'If ... . . . . . ... .S%. .V. h.S.6.. ..:,......'. .
Y: n, ".V : ~r:: S~r:":" . F............. .1:+. ....:". "": .F' .:"t': ..+. ..:'5a .:..F: h .. L.. Y.,a:":"
.",...:....... t ~~~ ..... ...." .....R.. .. ............ "' ....... ... } vr6S6W V . .h "....

BEST SCREEN PLAY

;I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Rooms 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m.' of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; 'Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, MAY 4
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild - "East of Eden,"
rchitecture Aud., 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Events Monday
Advanced Fire School I-Registration,
Civil Defense Center, 8:30 a.m.
Elements of Outdoor Recreation
Planning - Registration, Lobby, Mich-
tgan Union, 8:00 a.m.
General Notices
Sigma XI-Lecture---Dr. Thomas T.
Goldsmith, National Sigma Xi Lectur-
er, professor of physics, Furman Uni-
versity, Greenville, S.C., Tuesday, May
7, Rackham Amphitheater, 8:00 p.m.
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB .
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings received
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES'
Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially
recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are
available in room 1011 SAB.
University Lutheran Chapel, May 5,
1968 9:45 a.m., 1511 Washtenaw, Ser-
mon: "Complementing Christ's Promis-
es" by Pastor Scheips.
Graduate Student Outing Club, May
5, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Rackham Bldg., Hu-
ron Street, (A hike through the woods).
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, May 8,
1968, 8:30 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw, Bible
study: The Promise of the New" at
10:00, Vesper Service, student-led.
Bach Club Meeting, Wed., May 8,
1908, 8:00 p.m.; Guild house, 802 Mon-
roe. Program: a talk by John Harvith
on "Plagiarism." For further informa-
tion call 709-2922.

by General Division, call 764-7460 for
further information.
Alliance Rubber Company, Hot
Springs, Ark.-Graduate in advertising
and marketing, interest in adm. in
layout, commercial art, list computa-
tions, trade journal adv. and supervi-
sion of direct mail. Adv. potential to
top imaginative adv. mgr.
Managament Consultants, New Jer-
sey-Personnel consultants specializing
in serving the plastic-packaging in-
dustry seek personnel for firms in all
parts of the country. Great variety of
products utilizing all sorts of packg.
processes, firms range in size greatly.
Most require exp r., 5-10 years typical,
and degrees in engineering. Positions
include plant management, adm., pur-
chasing, design, project mgmt, research
and production,
Research and Development Division,
Defense Language Institute, Monterey,
Calif.-Education Specialist, test and
measurement, improvement instru-

ments measuring student achievement
and proficiency in language, aptitude,
a'titudes, adjustment and motivation,
MA psycholinguistics, psych, educ.
psych plus min 12 hrs. more in stat,
psychometric, math, psych, plus 2
years using modern. educational meth-
ods, gained as teacher or researcher.
Education Specialist, Faculty Training,
School-wide faculty dev. and in-serv-
ice programs in linguistics, methodol-
ogy, audio-visual aids, tests and meas-
urements, cultural patterns, psychol-
ogy of learning, MA in linguistics, mod.
for. languages, Engl. as For. Lang., or
Mod. For. Lang. Educ, plus 12 hrs more
in Teacher training supv. of Practice
Teaching, Princ. and Methods of Mod.
For. Lang. Teaching plus 2 years using
modern principles gained as a teacher.
City of Oakwood,'"Oakwood, Ohio -
Intern-Administrative Assistant, man,
MA/MPA/MBA desired, BA necess.
pref. some exper in personnel and/or
finance, working with people or abili-

A GEORGE WEIN Presents the I5th Annual-.
NzwpoiT fA ?ES1T1V1L
July 4 thru July 7, 1968
at Festival Field Newport, Rhode Island
Four Evening Concerts -- Thursday: Count Basie, Barney Kessel, Jim
..Hall, Nina Simone, Gary Burton, Mongo Santamaria, Cannonball
Adderley, and others; Friday: "Schlitz Salute to Big Bands" - Duke
Ellington, Count Basie, Woody Herman, Dizzy Gillespie Reunion
Band and guest artists; Saturday: Dionne Warwick, Duke Ellington,
t Alex Welsh, Ruby Braff, Pee Wee Russell, Joe Venuti, Bud Freeman,
: Hugh Masekela; Sunday: Wes Montgomery, Horace Silver, Ramsey
Lewis, Roland Kirk, Vi Redd, Don Ellis, Flip Wilson and others.'
. Three Afternoon Concerts - Friday: Freddie Hubbard, Lucky;
Thompson, Dizzy Gillespie, Elvin Jones, Archie Shepp and others; ;
zSaturday: Duke Ellington, Johnny Hodges, Benny Carter, Montego+
Joe, Tat" Farlow, Sonny Criss; Sunday: An Afternoon with Ray Charles.
Evening and Sunday Afternoon tickets: $3.50, 4.50, 5.50
+r (Box Seats: $10.00)
Friday and Saturday Afternoon - General Admission: $3.00
THE NEWPORT FOLK FOUNDATION Presents the,.
NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL ~
tormjr vnn July 23 thru July 28
' Four major evening concerts Thursday through Sunday, afternoon+
events, Children's Day, Square Dancing, and other special events.
: Roy Acuff, Theo Bikel, Bread & Puppet Theatre, Judy Collins,!
* Elizabeth Cotton, Arlo Guthrie, George Hamilton IV, John Hartford
Richie Havens, B. B. King, Jim Kweskin, Penny Whistlers, Jean
.Ritchie, Pete Seeger, Ken Threadgill, Doc Watson and many others..
Evening Tickets: Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.: $3.50, 4.50, 5.50
. (Box Seats: $10.00)
-'Tues., Wed. Eves. & Afternoon Events: $2.00 General Admission
" -- Group Rates Available -
'«. All Programs Subject to Change
- For Information and Tickets regarding all Newport Festivals,
Write .. . Newport Festivals, P.O. Box 329
Newport, Rhode Island 02840

I
I

ty to be trained, initiative, pref, draft
exempt.
State of Michigan, Department of
Administration, Lansing, Mich.-Mech-
anical Engineer, BSE in ME or IE andI
3-6 years exper, plan and supv. me-
chanical functions on all state owned
and leased buildings and properties.
Equitable Life Insurance Company,:
Ypsilanti, Mich.-Representatives (2),
sales of all types of ins., two yr. on-
the-job trng, adv. to mgmt, flexible
work. Man, BA pref., not necess, no
exper req., over 25 age.
Midwest Research Institute, Kansas
City, Mo.-Positions in Biology, Bac-
teriol., Microbiol., Physiologist, Bio-
:hem, Chemistry, Economics, Engineer-
ing, Math, Physics, EDP, Psych., O.A.,
varying degrees, and levels of exper.
CINEMA GUILD
Friday-Saturday
May 3 & 4
SCASABLANCA
Starring: Humphrey Bogart,
Ingrid Bergman, Sydney
Greenstreet, Claud Rains.
Dir.: M. Curtis.
One of THE ten
best pictures
7:00 9:05 P.M.
Architecture Aud.
662-8871
Still only 75c

SHOWS TO

hl A I

D IA L & S D A Y
5-6290 ~& SUN DAY
5-6290
. . .. 3, 5, 7, 9 P
"LARGER THAN LIFE-AND JUST
POSSIBLY TWICE AS SHOCKING!"
-SATURDAY REVIEW
"**** ! DOUBLE-EDGED SEX !"
-N.Y. DAILY NEWS

)DAY
at 1,
P.M.

t

1

2tAF
NO 2-6264

TODAY
DOUBLE
B F EA TUR E

I

SANDY DENNIS

KEI R DULLEA
1) H.-LAWRENCE'S

TLIE

kts as
Wild'
as her
hair!

COLUJMBIA PICTURES presents a
Stanley Kramer
production
Spencer Sidney
TRACY POImER
Katharine
HEPBURN

coming
toCdinner
TECHNICOLOR'l

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICH!GAN DAILY

a-

r

pr

r -- -__ -

, 4

Michtaet TomsJc./
"MROUND
THE WORJ
IN 80 DAYS'
DadN en Cantinflas
RvbertNewton
ShireayMacIine A
wShows at
2.00-5 .04-8

7=
at 2:45-6:00-9:25 PLUS
DougMcCaue
TECHNICOLOR4
a kk' ~at 1 :00-4:15-735: ,

'0

}

l

3020 Washtenaw Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor

SHOW TIME:
Wednesday-Saturday-Sunday
1 :00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
Other days at 7:00 & 9:00

FROM THE COMPANY THAT GAVE YOU THE YEAR'S MOST
TALKED ABOUT MOTION PICTURE, "I, A WOMAN."

p

This is Benjamin.
He's a little
worried about
his future.

"The eye-catcher is Uta Levka, the "Carmen herself, Uta Levka, plays the
hip Carmen in modern undress. sexpot temptress for all she's worth-
'Carmen Baby', obviously is a and that's quite something. She has
film for a very special clientele a let's-have-fun look in her eyes that
p-opera lovers, who want to see recalls Melina Mercouri in "Never on
what they've been missing Sunday." With "La Dolce Vita" parties
all these years, and voyeurs, thrown in for good measure, the movie
who just want to see." will give you your money's worth."
-NEW YORK TIMES -N.Y. POST

'I

I

THE GRADUATE ECICOLOR* 8PANAVSION*
Directed by Acaderhy Award Winner
MIKE NICHOLS

TONIGHT AT THE
4 Hlee 8:uje
1421 Hill Street 8:3(

0 P.M.

III

f ir

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan