100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 16, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, July 16, 1968

recdrds

I

New releases:

Who could ask

for more?

FOR FUN AND
PROFIT
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!
! NO WAITING
" 7 BARBERS
* OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

By R. A. PERRY
Several of these columns
have been devoted to the enig-.
matic and seminal piano mu-
sic of Erik Satie, and to the
splendid recordings by Aldo
Ciccolini on the Angel label.
Trying to break in on the
Satie boom and on Angel's
previously exclusive s e r i e s,
Philips has released a worthy
recording of several recently
unearthed Satie scores played
by Evelyne Crochet. The new
Philips recording (PHS900-179)
also includes the engrossing and
serene Trois Gymnopedies and
Six Gnossiennes.
Miss Crochet has previously
recorded successful discs, espe-
cially of the piano music of
Faure, on the Vox label; she is
an outstanding performer and
her appearance on the higher
quality Philips line must be ap-
plauded.,
As for her renditions of Satie,
she is more prone to intellect-
ually exploring the inner mys-
teries of the Frenchman's mu-
sic than is the more genially
all-accepting Ciccolini.
This tendency is both good
and bad. On the pro side, she
yields us a more searching con-
tact with the music. If you
agree with Oscar Wilde, how-
ever, that to "conceal the ar-
tist is art's aim," that is, to
make us forget the instrument
for the music, you might prefer

Ciccolini. Crochet sometimes in
her crystalline clarity tries to
load the fragile music with
questionable import.
The recorded sound given to
Ciccolini creates a more dif-
fused piano sound; the clean
and clear Philips surface is
brighter and more pointed.
Miss Crochet performs the
Three Piano Pieces, Op. Posth.,
and the Op. 143 Sonata of
Schubert on Philips PHS900-
178. Again, the reading comes
across as powerful, controlled,
and well-planned, but seldom"
does Miss Crochet transport
us away from the keyboard.
Alfred Brendel shapes the
Three Piano Pieces more plas-
tically on his less well-recorded
Vox disc, and Ashkenazy's per-.
formance on London offers
hard competition for the Op.
143 Sonata, but Miss Crochet
misses little poetry in her very
pianistic performances.
,The Philips sound is ex-
celent.
Angel has released two sec-
ond symphonies by two very
nationalistic composers. Ralph
Vaughn Williams' A London
Symphony portrays that city
from sun-up to misty sunset in
beautiful and evocative or-
chestral writing.
Written in 1914. the sym-
phony seeks to speak to and of
the English people and not
, simply to current musical
style. It is "democratic" (the

composer's word) and not "in-
tellectual."
Sir John Barbirolli pulls a
splendid performance out of
the Halle Orchestra, much bet-
ter than on his previous re-
cording of the work for Van-
guard and the sound creates
an appropriately s p a c i o u s
panorama. (S-36478)
Borodin's Second Symphony
strives for mightier effects, but
never quite convinces that
there is much matter to be so
heroic about.
The lyrical pronouncements
do not possess the personal ex-
pression of the Vaughn Wil-
liams' work, but the symphony
on the whole entertains on an
above-par movie-score level.
It and two shorter works are
idiomatically played by the
less than perfectly unified
U.S.S.R. Symphony Orchestra
under Yevgeny Svetlanov. (SR-
40056)
Opera fans will not doubt be
-attracted to two other new
Angel releases: "Scenes and
Arias from Rimsky-Korsakov
Operas" (SR-40052) and "Stars
of the Bolshoi" (SR-40050) A
few caveat emptors are in
order.
On the latter disc, Vladimir
Atlanov in "Pagliacci non son"
waxes as melodramatically as
any tragic D. W. Griffith hero.
Irina Arkipova, who present-
ed a wonderful Tchaikovsky re-
cital on Angel recently, tries to

carry off Carmen's "Sequidilla"
in Russian and sounds like the
proverbial chicken about to be
decapitated. The essentially
heavily dramatic and declama-
tory Russian operatic style sim-
ply does not adapt well to the
longer vocal mellifluence of
Italian and French singing.
The versatility of Galina
Vishnevskaya is an exception
but she is sadly given a mere
two minute snippet from Ma-
dame Butterfly.
Only Mark Reshetin, a bass
who carries the history and
soul of Russia in his voice, ren-
ders a wholly artistic perform-
ance, here of Pimen's "Mono-
log" from Boris, but it is cer-

tainly not alone worth the price Mor
of the disc. above
The Rimsky-Korsakov disc, the re
featuring essentially the same the lea
artists (sans Reshetin) offers ta Luc
the otherwise unavailable fare is cut
of excerpts from Sadko, The label.t
Snow Maiden, and The Tsar's songs
Bride. The music breaks occa- nacht
sionally into a lush lyricism, and fi
but for the most part I found ben. W
the excerpts derivative and bor- works
ing, unable themselves to sus- shaped
tain an interest that they might Moore
within context. Need
Russian singers strive for -

e treasurable than the
Russian discs by far is
cital of Mahler songs by
ading mezzo today, Chris-
dwig - and the recording
on the budget Serahpim
(S-60020) Three Ruckert
(including Um Mitter-
that Ferrier recorded)
Ive songs from Das Kna-
underhorn are among the
exquisitely felt and
d by Miss Ludwig. Gerald
accompanies.
d one say more?
------on

,.

steely, not pearly, voices (ex-
cept Vishnevskaya) and the
Russian recording microphones
only accentuate the hard sound.

I

Florida police, reach

Dial NO 2-6264
LAST 2 DAYS
A John Beck-NANO Produclof
TECNII" 40 unntd Artys

I

COPE FOR SHERIFF
H ELP RESTORE PRIDE
IN THE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Please make your check payable to Copi for Sheriff
and send it to R. Sauve, Treasurer, 1315 Cam-
bridge, Ann Arbor.
NATIONAL GENERAL. ORPORATiO COMPLETE
3rd GREAT FOX EASTERN THEATRES SHOWPNGT
FO VILL1 E SHOWINGS
WEEK! F X ~1:00-3:00-5:00
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 7:15-9:30
____ WEDNESDAYSHOWINGS-_3:00 - 5:00 - 7:15 - 9:30
PARAMOUNT PICTURES presents
4akenaon andter~attha
are
4'The Odd .:.
c~ouplet

i'

._ .r... _. _...... . 1 ,. .. .

_ _ _ i

*

blacks In rovin gbus
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP)- day camp and - more importan
A bright orange "police station on ly -- provide a place where th
wheels" is playing a major role can air their gripes.
in a progressive community rela- "We take complaints and i
tions program authorities in this on them," Sgt. Robert Lutes sa
sunbaked Florida resort city say is yesterday. "Many of the grip
transforming potential rioters into have nothing to do with crim
concerned citizens. they're about sanitation, po
Staffed by five policemen, the housing and junk cars."
gaily colored bus is used to haul The response has been treme
slum youths to ball games and dousl1vgratifying.he said

It
ey

i

act
aid
pes
ae;
aor

t
'I,,
r

I U
in~ -- 1:111 :~'i ii' ia.

I

.-Marts THURSDAY! 2

I

. ;.V iQ tip? i/ \VY/7 i

F

in-
Int

20th Century-Fox Presents
- w

40

_... .. f t{W .S
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, JULY 16
Day Cal endar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar -- "Advanced Personnel Officers
Course No. 9", Rm. 141, School of Busi-
ness Administration, 8:15 a.m. to 10:00
p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
iar - "Management of Managers Pro-
-gram No. 63", North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m, and 7:00 to
9:00 p.m
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Previews -"Prints, Glass, and An-
tonio Gaudi," Multipurpose Rm., Un-
dergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
Department of Classical Studies Lee-
ture - Richard C. Benjamin, Evalu-
ation Director, Foreign Language Inno-
vative Curricula Study, The University
Students hit
OSA bylaw
(Continued from Page 1)
services. The council, they said,
was intended by the Student Re-
lations Committee to be a policy
committee rather than an ad-
visory committee.
Fleming countered that the or-
iginal recommendations of SRC
called for an advisory committee
and that it was from this pre-
liminary recommendation the by-
law proposal was drafted.
The students also objected to
references in the bylaw to pro-
cedures for authorization of pub-
lie meetings inviting outside
speakers. Authority over this area
has been delegated to and as-
sumed by SGC for several years,
they said.
Fleming yesterday warned that
any demonstration against the
bylaw would be disastrous for
students and result in toughening
the disputed chapter of the Re-
gents' bylaws.
He defended the proposal, ex-
plaining to the committee that it
is a "purely interim" action and
can be revised in the fall when
the ad -hoc group finishes draft-
ing recommendations on the Uni-
versity Council, Committee on
Communications, and University
Judiciary.

of Michigan, "Initial Stages in Devel-
oping Programmed Materials", Aud. C,
Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
CIC Movie - Senhime Goten, in
Japanese, will be shown Tues., in Aud.
A of Angell Hall at 8:00 p.m.
University Musical society - David
Bar-Illan, Pianist, Aud., Rackham Bldg.,
8:30 p.m.
General Notices
CIC Lecture - Wed., July 17. Prof.
Akira Koma, University of Wisconsin,
"Some Pitch Placement Rules in Mod-
ern Japanese;" Noble Lounge, 627 Ox-
ford Rd., 7:30 p.m.
STUDENT CONDUCT IN
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Approved by mail ballot of the- Ex-
ecutive Board on July 10, 1968, on the
understanding that portions not pre-
viously approved by the Board will re-
main in effect only until reconsidera-
tion prior to October 30, 1968.)
In establishing a standard of stu-
dent conduct, The University of Michi-
gan is committed to the basic principle
of entrusting each student with a high
degree of freedom to govern his life
and conduct while enrolled at the
University.
The Horace H. Rackham School of
Graduate Studies encourages its stu-
dents to protect and utilize this free-
dom with wisdom and good judgment,
and to accept and discharge the re-
sponsibility inherent to such freedom.
The student is expected to develop
his relationships with integrity; to re-
spect the rights and, properties of oth-
ers; to comply with University regula-
tions and public laws; and to live with
high standards of personal and social
conduct.
The Graduate School welcomes the
participation of students in decision-
making relevant to their affairs. The
Graduate assembly represents the in-
terests and views of the graduate stu-
dent body to the Executive Board and
its representatives participate in delib-
erations of that Board on matter of
direct concern to the student body.
The School encourages the individual
departments and graduate programs to
develop similar formal arrangements
facilitating communication and deci-
sion-making in their respective areas.
To benefit from such activity, each stu-
dent should recognize his responsibility
to his fellow students and to the fac-
ulty, and should discharge his duties
with the high standards that make
such student-faculty relationships ef-
fective and valuable.
The Executive Board of the Gradu-
ate School, through delegation from
the Regents, reserves the right to dis-
cipline, exclude from participation in
relevant activities, or dismiss any stu-
dent whose academic performance is
unsatisfactory or whose conduct is in
violation of the general standards es-
tablished by the School or specific
standards established by the depart-
ment or program. The student will al-
ways have the right to a formal state-
ment of charges, to be presented with
the evidence against him, to a formal
or informal hearing with an adviser
(present, to be able to present evidence
in his own behalf, and to have the right
of appeal to the Executive Board.
For the Graduate School as a whole,
relevant conduct is particularized in
specific statements, established by the
Executive Board after consultation with
the Graduate Assembly and other con-
cerned bodies. One such statement,

March 15, 1967, and subsequently ap-
proved by the Regents deals with re-1
sponsibility of any scholar to honor
the freedom of expression of others:
"Members of a community of
scholars have the responsibility for
respecting and protecting the rights
of others to express their views.
Interference with orderly and peace-
able discussion is inexcusable and
will not be tolerated in a Univer-
sity community.
"A graduate student is in train-
ing to become a member of the ,
community of scholars, and one of f
the hallmarks of that community ,
Is free and objective discussion.
When a student seeks to curtail in
any way the freedom of discussion
of others, he calls in question his
fitness for a scholarly career. The
Executive Board has authority with
regard to student discipline to the
extent necessary to maintain the
freedom of expression of its fac-
ulty, student body and guests."
In addition to general regulations of1
the Graduate School, individual de-
partments and programsmay establish
explicit codes of ethical and legal con-
duct relevant to the professional or
scholarly careers toward which their
programs are directed, and recommend1
action to the Giaduate School consist-
ent with such codes.
OFF- CAMPUS BEHAVIOR
The Horace H. Rackham School of,
Graduate Studies is concerned with
the behavior of a graduate student off
campus if, and only if, such behavior'
or conduct bears directly upon the stu-
dent's scholarly qualifigations as a
member of the academic community
as opposed to his or her moral or po-
litical behavior as a citizen.
ON-CAMPUS BEHAVIOR
All elements of the University com-
munity are affected by the behavior
of individuals, regardless of status,
when acting within that community.
The Graduate School reserves the right,
therefore, to discipline students en-
rolled in it for violation of the fol-
lowing standards of conduct on Univr-
sity-owned or controlled property or at
University-sponsored or -supervised
functions:
1. Dishonesty, such as cheating, pla-
giarism, or knowingly furnishing false
information to the University such as
forgery, alteration, or misuse of Uni-
versity documents or academic creden-
tials;
2. Failure to meet obligations in
teaching and research employment rele-
vant to and educationally related to the
student's acadmic program;
3. Obstruction or disruption of teach-
ing, research, administration, disciplin-
ary procedures, or other University ac-
tivities, including its public service
functions, or of other authorized ac-
tivities on University premises;
4. Physical abuse of any person onE
University-owned or -controlled prop-
ert~y or at University-sponsored or
-supervised functions or conduct which
threatens or endangers the health or
safety of any such person.
Rules 3 and 4 are substantively in
accordance with the similar rules
passed by SGC and recommended by
SACUA

PROCEDURES FOR ENFORCING .
RULES OF CONDUCTZ
The procedures described below re-
lated to the enforcement of rules of
conduct established by the Executive
Board or to rules of conduct established
by the Board of Regents, the enforce-
ment of which are delegated by them
to the Excutive Board. t
1. Charges of violation are forward-
ed to the Dean of the Graduate School.
2. The Dean will conduct a prelim-
inary investigation to determine
whether or not there is sufficient ba-
sis of evidence to justify formal con-
sideration. He may dismiss the charges
or refer them to the Graduate School
Board of Inquiry, informing the stu-
dent of the charges and acquainting
him with the procedures of the Gradu-
ate School in investigating such
charges.
3. The Board of Inquiry of the
'raduate School will be composed of
three members of the Graduate Facul-
ty and two Rackham students ap-
pointed by the Executive Board. Ini-
tially, three faculty members will be
appointed for terms of one, two, and
three years respectively from a panel
of ight faculty members, two nomin-
ated by each divisional board; and
two graduate students will be appoint-
ed for terms of one and two years re-
spectively from a panel of four nom-
inated by the Graduate Assembly. An-
nually in subsequent years, one fac-
ulty member would be appointed for
a three-year term from a panel of two,
one nominatd by each of the two un-
represented divisional boards, and one
studnt would be appointed for a two-
year term from a panel of two nom-
inated by the Graduate Assembly. The
Board of Inquiry would choose its own
chairman annually, would have right
to seek advice and counsel, and may
have advisers present at its sessions.
(Continued on Page 6)

uv ay g ayaa, . aa, ~
areas where youths once stoned
police cars he says they are now
r'eporting crimes.
Lutes said the bus is an exten-
sion of Operation Store Front,
launched this spring in the north-
west section of the city where'
most of Fort Lauderdale's 30,000
Negroes live.
"We've gotten jobs for 56 kids
this summer and we've created a
lot of good will. Last weekend we
had only two disturbance calls in
the entire northwest section -
that's fantastic."
3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
LiWIS
"DONrT
RIS
THe BrIDGE
3 L OWERP
' THE PJVeR"
TECHNIOMOR* I
SHOW TIME
WED.-SAT.-SUN.
1-3-5-7-9:05
OTHER DAYS 7 & 9

at
7:00 and 9;
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
? Best Foreign Film!
} * Best Story and Screen Play!

t..on:-L41

......

:00

I

FOR
ALL
YOUNG
LOVERS
WHEREVER
ARE
A IA MAN ACADEMY
AWARDS
&Nd AWOMAN WINNER
-E-ASED BY A1LpOARTSTS

I

i

I

..I

111

N11113-1 I

1!J111lHt

THE
Lh.- EPE0TRY
L...COMPANM

I

' '

(6'The Producers' very
my stomach muscles

nearly ruptured
I laughed so hard.

Go and see it and see what professional

comedy is e.-GLAMOUR
}omh . I v P~n P
Z[LC MCSTI
"THEIIC )qC
n Mel Bro,,s E
A Sd , .y.Gi.. I rodkox r
A, . m .,'%M.i -In Color
NOW MIica

_IL
EUS.s

I

SEPTEMBER 17-29
MOLIERE'S Directed by
Stephen Porter
Adapated by
Wilbur
Richard
A delightful satiric romp
OCTOBER 1-13
A contemporary approach to
ShakespearedM
Directed by Ellis Robb " Music by Conrad Susa

I

I

k,

DIAL
5-6290

7r action . )laern Q ooinq

I

q

4 OCTOBER 15-27
The comedy-fantasy by a master of modern theatre.
-- .*- ..
By Sean O'Casey
Directed by Jack O'Brien -Music by Bob James

approved by the Executive Board on

(.{
* j
A

"A FEMININE 'ALFIE!' Carol White.
emergesasarival of
lulis Christie and Faye Dunaway
A STAR IS BORN!"
--Wanda Hale, New York Daily News
National General Pictures presents
A Josephjanni Production
Tercea
as DaYe

U"'Il

I t15
jun5.

9Ap. TW A fM I Re. I F1.
S/f. fl i. I FI I SFT.

3101
M'SU
W's,
5'-.'

Irs
suk,

!,~k OW~iI ..U SIf . , T S7 M I ! WM

SBSIE RI~ YiIHiS ttAR 6 iWRaTiS, M5U41 *05A E 6 im" S iS
1.6 j 6 m , . ,,wuw ,,meme Sews,, 5' k * iEv 6 5US
OCIOUR T4mm, . mBRinaT Tmnwn Aown AS "w" ASRAm., ,,m,,
74 8 A3e.es Se.n err Sws n Swa, tll,K,
scu, ,,~,, mie, Ri..,S-rmsv ,w,
OCTB2 R 1 ,, lARMSM , RA ,R R T,* 1S,.,, R"'.0~ I R S"A

Frday and Saturday Evenngs
S'. a Seat Three Pia' iIS% ,ft 0325% Saving
Orchestra 13 Rows A- $6.00 $18.00 $15.30 $13.50
Orchestra 10 Rows M-W 500 1500 1235 11.25
Itlcony 4 Rows AO 500 1500 1275 1125
Balcony 4 Rows E 400 1200 1020 900
Balcony 2 RmwsAi- 3.00 9.00 1:65 6.75
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday Evenings, Swinday Matkomt and SwF
day Evenings

i0

S,'o'n Seat
Orchestra 13 Rows AA-t $5.00
Orchestra 10 Rows MW 4.D0
Balcony 4 Rows A-D 4 00
Balcony 4 Rows ERH 3.00
Balcoy 2 Rows JA 200

fsh., Pice
$15.00
1200
1200
9.00
6.00

15% S A,
$12.75
1020
1020
765
5.10

Subs"Ibers
25% seems
$11.25
9.00
SAD0
6.75
450

I I - --- - -

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan