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June 18, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 18, 1968

Poge Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, June 18, 1968

,

Government scrutinizes

WASHINGTON (CPS)-The U.1
Civil Rights is keeping a close wa
administrators at predominately w
and universities react to the dema
testing black students on their cam
The civil rights officials want t
that the administrators do not bow
mands of black students, if by do
violate any of the civil rights legisl
by Congress.
At the same time, the Offic
Rights, which is part of the De
Health, Education, and Welfare, is
its investigation of white colleges to
black students are not discriminE
in such areas as housing, recruitm
financial aid policies, and athletic
Civil rights officials visited a
campuses this spring, and will co
visits throughout the summer and
By the end of the year, about 1
will have been investigated to dete
cial discrimination exists, accordi
hua B. Zatman, a spokesman for th
office.
Federal officials have had to
only one case so far where the:
agreement between protesting bla
and white administrators inconsiste:
rights laws.
The case involved Northwester
where the administration agreed to
arate living units for Negro stu
agreement was one of several reach
black students occupied the uni
ministration building for 38 hours. 7
tration also agreed to provide spec
campus for black students' activit
Llyod R. Henderson, chief of
tion branch of the civil rights off
letter to Northwestern President

black demands,
S. Office for coe Miller saying that the university could lose
tch on how its federal financial assistance if it carried out
hite colleges the agreement with the black students.
nds of pror Henderson said Title VI of the Civil Rights
puses. Act of 1964 bars "recipients of federal financial
o make sure assistance from entering into agreements or pro-
to the de- mulgating rules . . . . which allocate housing
ing so they or activity space belonging to or controlled by
ation passed the university on - a purely racial basis."
Henderson's letter added, "The legislative
ce for Civil history and language of the act express a'clear
partment of national policy in favor of racial assimilation
stepping up and against racial separatism; thus, in knowing-
insure that ly giving sanction to a policy of racial separa-
tism in their programs or activities, an in-
tent policies, stitution of higher education receiving, federal
programs. financial assistance would be acting in a
handful of manner inconsistent with its assurance of com-
ntinue their pliance under Title VI."
fall. 1Northwestern administrators have announced
00 campuses they will renegotiate their agreement with the
mng to Jos- black students to insure compliance with civil
e civil rights rights laws.
James Turner, chairman of the Afro-Ameri-
intervene in can Student Union, has said if the Office for
y found an Civil Rights continues to oppose separate housing
ick students for black students, he will request a federal in-
nt with civil vestigation of fraternities and sororities. "This
black living unit idea is nowhere near as ex-
n University, clusive as fraternities and sororities," he said.
provide sep- Civil rights officials have been planning to
idents. The investigate fraternities and sororities anyway.
ed after the A spokesman said HEW and civil rights officials
versity's ad- who visit campuses this summer and nekt fall
The adminis- may review the policies of Greek organizations
al rooms on that occupy buildings which are leased from
ies. colleges or universities.j
the educa- If all-white fraternities and sororities oc-
ice, wrote a cupy university property, the institutions could
James Ros- be violating the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

o adPool
WASHINGTON (A) - A group
of student leaders representing a
variety of campus organizations,
causes, and presidential candidates
has issued a call for a "new youth
comsmitment" to meeting the de-
mands of the poor, beginning with
"massive" participation in the
Mobilization for the Poor People's
Campaign here tomorrow.
The call, coordinated by offi-
cials of the National Student As-
sociation, listed severil easons
which make it "clear to us that
efforts to achieve change in this
country have reached a critical
stage."
"Widespread indifference to the
proposals of the President's riot
commission report; Congressional
intransigence to meeting the needs
of the poor; cries for law and or-
der without corresponding de-
mands for justice and equality
in our nation's cities; highlighted
by the assassinations of Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr., and, recently,
Sen. Robert Kennedy," were cited
as reasons.
Mrs. Susan Oliver, a former
staff member of Kennedy Youth
Action, said at a press conference
this week that joining the Poor
People's Campaign will appeal to
former Kennedy supporters who
might feel lost but who still "feel
it is important to, continue im-
provement." NSA President Ed
Schwartz said the effort to get
I support from student political

Tb

0

NSA issues plea for mobilization

'reopi es campalg -
groups was generated by the as- statement said, "that politicians
sassination of Kennedy, but that at every level of government who
more than 10 student body lead- oppose new programs for the poor
ers pledged their support before will feel the full brunt of student
Kennedy's death. power against them this summer
Student coordinators for the and next fall as they seek elec-
campaigns of Sen. Eugene Mc- tion. We insist that there must be
Carthy, Vice President Hubert a reordering of national priorities
Humphrey, and, Gov. Nelson for a totalmobil zation of all re-
Rockefeller, and leaders of the sources to eliminate poverty. This
Campus Young Democrats and has been said often enough, but
Campus Americans for Democratic we must mean it. We intend to
Action, joined Schwartz in sign- make a major new youth commit-
ing the statement. ment to securing the enectnment
"We must make it clear," the of this new program."
After lo these many years our humble
little bug has, gone automatic.
Gone is the clutch.
Gone is the wifely whine, "It's cute, but
I can't drive it."
Gone isan era of Volkswagendom.Sniff.
And in its place?
A Volkswagen you con drive al over
town without shifting.
Only on the highway do you shift.
Once. (This is an economy move, Wich,
after all s still the name of the game.)
But you do hve a choice in the matter.
you con drive it the easy way (described
above). Or you con start out in low and
take it through the gears like a regular
stick shift.
The automatic stick shift is an option:
you pay aqlittle more
But you do a little less.
Howard Cooper Volkswagen
2575 So. State St. Ann Arbor Phone 761-3200 AUTNORIZsb
Open Mon. & Thurs. till 9 P.M. Overseas Delivery Available
HEL D QVE R-ONLY 2 MORE DAYS
"TEITELCUA''ELZPII N T . E

It

LastApril's ad building lock-in
COUNTING THE CASUALTIES:

DAI LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
a"
%:.:".. r t ?t; r'."$ " }: r ":. r''' sesamme assam

Roosevelt U reaches stalemate

4

By HARVEY WASSERMAN
CHICAGO (CPS) - A bitter
battle between the administration
and some students and faculty
members at Roosevelt University
has subsided into a vague stale-
mate, with extremely heavy
casualties on both sides.
The battle began in late March
when Roosevelt President Rolf
Weil overruled the recommenda-
tion of the history department
that historian Staughton Lynd
receive a three-year full-time
appointment to the faculty.
Weil vetoed the appointment!
on "ad hominum" 'grounds, re-
ferring not once to Lynd's capa-
cities as a teacher, but citing in-
stead some "private information"
he did not wish to disclose. The
president, however, did take pub-
lic note of a picture of the con-
troversial Lynd carrying a picket
sign.
Repeated attemptstby the fac-
ulty and students to get Weil
to change his decision failed,
and by late April the students
were mobilizing. A petition drive
gained wide student support,,and
Weil indicated he would listen to,
the students, while emphasizing,
he would not change his mind.!
A series of sit-ins began, which,
resulted in more than '70 student,
arrests. The university responded
by expelling 1$ students and sus-
pending many more.
In the meantime, faculty sup-
port for Lynd was increasing,3
and a group called the Committee
for Academic Freedom in Illi-
nois reorganized and began rally-
ing support in the academic com-
munity throughout the state.
The battle at Roosevelt came
to a head at the end of the
school year, when finals began
gutting the student momentum.
Well approached the University
Senate and told it to choose be-
tween him and Lynd. The Senate
chose Weil, endorsing in addi-
tion a statement commending
him "for his courageous refusal
to yield to the sit-ins."
But two faculty members,
Donald Bluestone and Miriam
Haskett, have decided to leave
Roosevelt's history department.
ATTENTION
FRESHMEN
Reserve your
teCtbooks NOW
Pick them up when you
return for fall classes.
NO CASH REQUIRED-all
advance orders guaranteed.
Save up to 1/3 on
Folletts used books.
Drop in or mail
your reservation card to
FOLLETT
322 S. State St.
Ann Arbor, Mich, 481t04

The local chapter of the Ameri-
can Association of University
Professors has called for a bo-
cott of the university by pros-
pective faculty members and for
an investigation of the incident
by the national organizatiori.
Also, an ad hoc group called
Students for a Quality Educa-
tion has been formed and is es-
tablishing a free school to offer
"a free and responsive intellec-
tual community at Roosevelt Uni-
versity."

The group's initial purpose was
to provide a salary to keep the
Lynd family in Chicago. Having
achieved this, its functions are
branching out. The Chicagb or-
ganizers' union plans to estab-
lish a course, and some ,members
of the free university are working
with high school students.
About two to three dozen per-
sons are !working to guarantee
the school's permanence. Class-
es will begin the first week in
July.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an cases, be proficient in the language of
official publication of the Univer- the host country. Selections will be
sity of Michigan for which The made on the basis of academic record,
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- the feasibility of the applicant's pro-
tal responsibility. Notices should be posed study plan and personal qualifi-
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to rations. Preference is, given to candi-
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg.. be- dates who have not had prior extended
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding study or residence-abroad, and who
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday are under the age of 35.
for Saturday and Sunday. General Application forms and, information
Notices may be published a maxi- frsuet urnl nolda h
mum of two times on request; Day tor students currently enrolled at the
Calendar items appear only once. University of Michigan may be obtained
Student organization notices are from 'the Graduate Fellowship Office,
not accepted for publication. For 1014 Rackham. Deadline for filing com-
more information call 764-9270. pleted applications is Oct. 7, 1968.
Qualified and interested students are
TUESDAY, JUNE 18 urged to act expediently in order that
necessary procedures may be completed
by the deadline.
Day Calendar,,
Bureau of Industrial Retions Sem- Foreign Visitors
inar - The Management of Managers The following are foreign visitors who
No. 61 North Caunpus Commons, 8:15 an be reached through the Foreign
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. nd 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Visitor PrJgrams Office, 764-2148.
nnua Metin ofthe mercanSo- Mr. Arun Joshi, Director of the Shri
Annual Meeti g of the American so- Ram Center for Industrial Relations,
git eis c thao ngis obandHR etoha - New Delhi, India, June 1-9
Bu in - g istr00 a ti.. L b y R c h m M r. and M rs. Ohanie G hauls , P o
Buiding, 8:00 ay. gsessor of Economics, Kabul University,
Executive President of Afghanistan Na-
Cenerf -r"oranm LeaSystemsysor-Lion Bnk e16-19.
Buinss-"Taiig yses or- Mr. Z. A. uOdunsi, Chief Engineer,
shop'": Michigan Union, 8:30 am, to! University of Lagos, Nigeria, June 24-27.

lege. Listings of these positions, and
procedure for applic.
City of New York ---Apply before
June 25. Junior Physicist, BA Phys./EE.
Junior Chenmist, BA level in Chem.,
ChE, Pharm. or prof. degree w/min.
24 hrs. chem. Senior Planiner, City
Ping./Engr./Arch./Ldscpe.lArch./Publ.
Ad./Econ./Soc./Stat./Geog./Law plus 8
yrs. exper., 3 in supv. city, ping. or MA
and 3 supv. yrs.
Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation,
1Lancaster, Ohio-Process Control Engr.
R & D. Accountants Internal Auditors,
Communications Coordinators, Data
Processing personnel, Construction EE,
Process Control, and Indust. engrs.
Chemists, Plymer, Physical and ChE.
Both exper. and non-exper. personnel,
University of Wisconsin Medical Cen-
ter, Madison, Wis. - Biologist-onocol-
ogy. Chem.-pediatrics. Sr. Biochem.-
pediat. Electron Microscope-biophys,
Chief Technician, adminiptration. Elect.
Micros-pathology, Biol.-Med.' Psych.
Asst.-Psych. Physics.' Biol.-Anatomy.
Chemist-Genetics. Artificial Kidney
Technician-VA Hasp.
Frederick Associates, Detroit, Mich-
Asst. to the Owner/Manager. Industrial
Advertising, trade publications. etc. No
'TV-Radio, printed media mostly. Abil-
ity in design, exper, in key-line art

wi

I

' [s desirable.- Man. Lrrauhie arts train-

5:00 p.m.
General Notices
TO STUDENTS WHO EXPECT TO!
EARN GRADUATE DEGREES AT THE;
END OF THE SUMMER TERM:
Graduates may elect to receive the
large diploma (size 13x17") without
additional cost provided written ap-
plication is made to the Diploma De-
partment no later than sixty days
before the closing date of the term in
which the degree is to be earned.
Applications for U.S. Government
Scholarships for 1969-70 under the Ful-
bright-Hays Act: Must be completed
and filed with the Graduate Fellow-
ship Office, 1014 Rackham Bldg., by
Oct. 7, 1968. Under the Fulbright pro-
4ram, over 950 American graduate stu-
dents will have an opportunity to
study in any one of 50 countries for
one year.
Candidates who wish to apply for
an award must be U.S. citizens at the
time of application, have a Bachelor's
Degree or its equivalent by the be-
,inning date of the grant, and in most

ing and exper., degree desired.
Pl cenent
uURIAU OF APPOINTMENTS Second class postage paid at Ann
3200 SAB Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
GENERAL DIVISION Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
Current Position Openings Received Daily except Monday during regular
by General Division by mail And phone academic school year.
-please call 764-7460 for further infor- Fall and winter subscription rate:
mation: $4.50 per term by carrier ($5 by mail);
State of Illinois, Booklet describing $8.00 for regular academic school year
1pportunities for college level trained ($9 by mail).
personnel and for those 'without col-
NAINL.NRL OPRTO

**

HELD
OVER
3fW W EEK

NAINALGNRA OPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FOX VILLh
375 No, MAPLE RD.-769.1300

FEATURE TIMES
2:25-4:30
7:00-9:25

-Associated Press
Out of the ashes
A woman from a pacifist group burns a draft card yesterday
near the Supreme Court building, to protest the last May's court
ban on burning and mutilating selective service cards. About 50
persons from anti-war groups attended the "burn-in."

NOTICE!!! CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS
EVERY DAY FOR THE SUMMER
"""PLANET OF THE APES' IS A
BLOCKBUSTER. FASCINATING19"
-Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan

After
"A MAN AND A WOMAN'
the new
love story by
Claude elouch

t
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor

EXCLUSIVE SHOWING
WED. -SAT.-SUN.
1:10-3:50-6:30-9:10
OTHER DAYS
7:00 and 9:18

20TH CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
CHARDJON HESTON'
in an ARTHUR R JACOBS production
RODDY McDOWALL MAURICE EVANS
KIM HUNTER-JAMES WHITMORE JAMES DALY
L' A ARRISON APJACPRODUCTIONS MORTABRAHAMS FRANKLIN I SCHAFFNER
MICIEL WILSON RO SERUNG x sonum m-' 7&B " PAAviSiON -COLOR BY OEOXE

41

j

I
I

I

-------------

11

YVES MONIANd
CANdICE BERqEN
ANNIE QIRARdOT
LIVEf
F IUE by

Carefree
Parking

Inside
Comfort

0

We Make Our
Own Weather

MON. thru THUR.-7:00-9:05,
FRL--7:00-9:05-,d 1:05,
SAT.-3-5-7-9:05-1 1:05, su"f..
SUN.-3-5-7-9:05
STARTS THURSDAY-7:00 & 9:00
IF YOU THINK YOU'RE OLD ENOUGH.

LAST 2 DAYS
SS -ITRS RAESMAND I DZLES.
T STROLLS... IT STRUTS... IT RAZZLES AND IT DAZZLES.

VOICE-SDS

General

Meeting

I

f

fl

I I

IT .'.' -

1 V&vdw~ rf wa.'

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