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June 13, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-13

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 13, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ThusdI Junrf 96

i

records

A

These scabby looking men tried to pt tlown the Beatles, not realizing it didn't have',to be done
Let'istry to1live with Sergeant Pepper

'Connoisseur': They try harder
By R. A. PERRY note, put tie piece back to- technique shines in "Feux d'a
Recently in this .clumn I gether again. He leaves little to tifice," it is the music and n
spoke of Columbia as the be- chance and therefore, unlike merely the technique that in
hemoth of the recording indus- some pianists, who, confident presses.
try, monthly pouring out discs of their technique, approach a The Romanticism he espouse
of both high and hasty quality. work like a skier a steep slope, here is that of the dreamer, no
he never presses hard upon :he the revolutionary, and whi
On the other end of the pro- music. the records are beautiful to li
duction scale sits small, but Often, his tempos are slower ten to, a touch of impetuosi
proudly, the Connoisseur So- than one expects, yet never out and greater dynamic shadin
ciety label. Only in business a of caution or academics. ' would not have been out 0
few years,eConnoisseur Society Needless to say, Moravec's order.
has centered its activity around technique is impeccable; each In a way, Beethoven remain
the sarod of Ali Akbar Khan, hand does not merely know Moravec's forte, for the pian
the guitar of Manitas de Plata, what the other is doing, but the ist's introspective inclinati
and the piano of Ivan Moravec. two work together in complete and integrity find suitable phi
Both Ali Akbar Khan and compassion. osophic content, and the wa
Manitas de Plata are known to Four of Ivan Moravec's re- in which he organically deve
rank as the highest artists of citals on Connoisseur Society ops the argument without th
their instruments (and if you are highly recommended, only atrical sham enables himt
haven't heard the fleet-fingered one with reservations. His De- reach, car--ing along the li
Spaniard, you've missed a truly bussy recital, along with iBou- tener, a truly transportive mu
exhilarating musical experi- lez's recent recording of La sical experience.
ence), but Ivan Moravec re- Mer, should help to dispel the Both the "Moonlight" ar
mains a much lesser known Impressionism label that has "Pathetique" sonatas (CS 1566
performer. for so long clouded up an ap- are splenddly played, but ti
Perhaps this is so because preciation of the incisive ori- "Appasionata" s o n a t a (C
Moravec, trained in Prague, ginality and constantly evolv- 2000) rises even above thes
does not "perform," in the the- ing structures of this composer. especially in the plastic shap
atrical sense, as do many pian- "Clair de lune," emerges not ing of the variations of the an
ists; nor does he appear fre- as a swash of hazy light, but as dante movement. Both th
Equently in the recital hall or many-faceted pinpoints of firt- power and the poetry in then
on records. Somewhat like the fracted sound. While Moravec'- readings are authentic.
Italian pianist Michelan-eli, he
remains aloof and his own man.
His fame, however, shall no
doubt increase, for he must
rank as one of the most moving TONIGHT at
and sensitive pianists playing
today.
Moravec's- integrity as an
artist certainly is apparent in
his recordings, where he totally 3 WY r
eschews melodrama, the put-on
passion, the facade of grand singing ndian classica a
feeling. The recital does not be- Folk music accompanying himself 1421 Hill St.
come an opportunity for thea- on the Tampoura. 8:34 .1.
tre, but remains what it should
be: a search for and a com- FRIDAY -
munion with the sentiment and
spirit that informs the music. -,Traditional Night at the Ark
Listen, for instance, to his
rendition of Debussy's "Claire
de lune," or the "Children's' with Barry O'Niel-singing Canadibn, English, and
Corner Suite" (CS, 1866) and Irish ballads, playing guifar, concertina and dulcimer.
then to any other version you
may own. How habitual the
second version will somehow-- --- --- --
sound, while not one note will
emerge as perfunctory under H ELD x EASTR1N TMOATRN.-FR*Q :25
Moravec's hands. OVER ENU U II2ISAT.-SUN.
It sounds as if Moravec has WEEK~b U~ 2:25-4:10
takenseaon piece apart note byWEEK 375 No. MAPLE RD. -7694300 7:00-9
note, and then, with careful-_____________________________
feeling for the inevitable right- NOTICEH! STARTING JUNE 15th
ness of the succession of each CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS DAILY

ir-
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By LITTLE SHERRI FUNN
Beatle Expert
Last week marked the end of
one year of rock music's attempt
Jo live with "Sergeant Pepper's
Lonely Hearts Club Band."
It has been a full 52 weeks
since The Beatles dealt rock the
blow that nearly destroyed it, and
although "Sgt. Pepper" has fallen
to the 43rd position on Billboard's
album charts, it still unfortunate-
ly, remains as one of the domi-
nant influences on today's scene.
I want to make perfectly clear
at the outset that I was never
disturbed by the album itself, but
rather by the reaction it pro-
voked. "Sgt. Pepper" was as much
a part of my "summer of love"
as it was part of everybody else's,
along with "Light, My Fire" and
"Fly Me Straight, Fly Me High."
I, too, remember with what de-
light I dissected each and every
track of "Sgt. Pepper," all the
way from "Is that really grass on
the cover?" to "Did you know there
were 42, 43, or 44 musicians on
A Day in the Life?" I remember
being totally knocked out by the
bass on "A Little Help From My
Friends" and the initials of "Lucy
in the Sky with Diamonds." I re-
member discussing "Fixing a
Hole" as the 'sleeper of the cen-
tury.' I remember the first time
I read that it was tape manipula-
tion of various harmonica sounds
that produced "Being for the
Benefit of Mr. Kite."

I remember skipping "Within
You, Without You" a million times
while playing the album because
it was a special track, one only
to be played by itself, away from
"When I'm 64" although I loved
that song too, mostly for Paul's
gentle humor. I remember prac-
ticing the precise moment to hol-
ler "RITA!" along with Paul. And,
of course, I felt that "A Day in the
Life" said it all.
"Sgt Pepper" is a great album,
possibly one of the best. It was
the first album to be a "whole
something, a total album, an al-
bum on which every track was a
part of every other track. It was
a milestone, but it paradoxically
destroyed a- great deal of the pro-
gress rock had made.'
In the wake of "Sgt. Pepper"
many people began to take rock
seriously, a disastrous consequence
for an art form deeply imbued
with a vitality that springs from
its ability to NOT take itself seri-
ously. People began in earnest to
apply labels to all sorts of rock
forms. It was not good enough
anymoretto like antalbum just be-
cause you liked it. Now you had to
categorize, discuss, and reason out
your affection for a group. It was
no longer the gut reaction, the
reaction that built the rock in-
dustry that counted.
"Life Magazine" would have
put The Beatles on its cover if it
hadn't been for the Six Day War.
"Newysweek" devoted a page to

"Sgt. Pepper." The album was re- As many people have observed,!
viewed in The New York Times. "Sgt. Pepper" walked the terribly
The final blow landed when.Time thin line between good and pre-
got the word, as they inevitably tension. The Beatles managed to
will, and put The Beatles on their bring their pretension off but
cover. most groups failed to get that
Everybody jumped on the won- message. They heard instead that
derful bandwagon that The Beat- they had to crap up their arrange-
les had made so accessible. ments, crap up their covers, and
I find it impossible to believe crap up their honesty in a never-
that all of the people who had ending search for an album com-
dismissed rock as stupid suddenly parable on all levels to "Sgt. Pep-
realized its place as the true musi- per." As a result we have been,
cal reflection of what goes on in flooded with an absolutely in-
the world today. I'm convinced credible number of technically
instead that secretly they always brilliant but creatively sterile rec-
had had a favorable gut reaction ords, records that sold' millions,
to rock and that they were just upon millions of copies, thanks to
a mite too pompous to give into it heavy promotion and an accept-
and say, "Jeez, this stuff is all ance by the trend-setters, little
right." But The Beatles dressed else.
it all up in a total package and It has taken a full year and
sold it to them lock, stock, and several disastrous attempts by,
mellotron. many groups to realize that they
So what did we have. A lot of have to work on their own musical
people talking about rock and thing, that they can never do a
writing about rock, and, worst of "Sgt. Pepper." Not that they
all, criticising rock with not the mightn't do something better
least bit of perspective or under- either. It just has to be different
standing. Sure, it's nicerthat so for every group.
many people got into rock, but The major album that saved
they did it on utterly false pre-_Themajoralbumthat__aved_
mises and they could only be
ultimately disappointed in rock. Second class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Miaynard St., Ann
They had no sense of their own Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
innocence regarding it. * excep ndaydur4.regular
Not that I care that much about academic school year.
what these neophytes were think- Fail and winter subscription rate:
ing, but I am very interested in '4.50 per term by carrier ($5 by mail);
the adverse effects they had on .$8OOfor regular academic school year

rock from destruction was "Magic-
al Mystery Tour." It wasn't much
of an album and a lot of people
realized it. They also realized that
The Beatles weren't superhuman
and that "Sgt. Pepper" was a one-
shot outburst, a climax of Beatle
development up to that time.
Nothing more, nothing less.
But now, finally after a full year
of being sYiackled by "Sgt. Pep-
per," rock is re-discovering itself.
How incredibly refreshing it is to
hear songs like "Jumpin' Jack
Flash," "Pictures of Matchstick
Men," and "Friends" instead of
the post-Pepper stuff.
Bob Dylan, as usual, was the
leader of this new "honesty" phase
in rock with "John Wesley Har-
ding," and he's getting strong sup-
por# from such unlikely places as
the so-called Rock Revolution, a
movement dedicated to bringing
back the oldies, possibly the most
honest music ever recorded,
"The present day composer
refuses to die," Zappa is fond of
saying. And nobody, not even The
Beatles or the media, has been
quite able to kill him off.

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CINEMA GUILD
JUARIEZ

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

EVERY DAY FOR TH E SUMMER
"PLANET OF THE APES"-1SA&
BLOCKBUSTER. ASCINATING.I
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RODDY McDOWAft MAURICE EVANS
KIM HUWER 'JAMES WH[[MRE JAMES DAlY
LNDA HARISON APAPRUCTINS-MORT ABRAHAMS-FRANKLIN).SCHAFFNER
WISON ROODSERUNG iSNUoMIH PERRE BOUUE PANAVISION' *COLOR BYDELUXE

y.,,... * r,';'.. *tl,.t+ r f Ffr1,rt'.'^ f:rr'asr ,",er>{:;:;5:;r;",:,;,f"'.s;$ r +"'^' :tier}{.r 4 :"w,:r :=i;:rti{:"r,'.,{r,;{{{,:"?ti: is{?rr"t;" ".};; v."r:.": r: .,
, r
1 : W,'fi"r d:{{'. 1d}4{ . t.M:.tiS's' A .Y.',...:}.'}J«. +'dFS: Y}Jh r",' d. :lJ:'" !{;.,..../I}:'.r"f::^l.t..f.":^.'.:. .^:%r,.".""^"1 . N:;"t; .{ .F.,....V... } ....,j"...:': :":'::

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THURSDAY, JUNE 13
Day Calendar
Pakistan Student Association of
ica Annual Convention - Registration,
South Quadrangle, 8:00 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sen-"
inar - "The Management of Managers
No. 61, North Campus Commons, 8:151
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Institute on College and University
Administration - First Session, Assem-
bly Hall, Rackham Building, 9:00 a.m.
Department of Speech Student Lab-
Dratory Theater - Eugene Ionesco's
"Frenzy for Two" and Jean-Claude van
Itallie's "War": Arena Theater, Frieze
Building, 4:10 p.m.
Chemistry Colloquium - Dr. S. T.
Brois, Esso Research and Engineering,
Linden, N.J., "Nitrogen Inversion in
kziridines," 1:300 Chem. Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
Doctoral Exams
John Kandelin Thorne, Metallurgical
Engineering, Dissertation: "Role of
Chemical Equilibria in the Silico-
thermic Reduction of Molybdenum Tri-
oxide in the Presence of Iron," on
Thurs., June 13 at 10:30 a.m. in Rm.
3201 E. Engrg. Chairman: L. H. Van
Vlack,
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR Al)-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in room 1011 SAS.
Christian Science Organization Testi-
mEony meeting, Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Rm.
3545, SAB.

Eike-Henner Wendelin Kluge, Phil-
osophy, Dissertation: "Functions andl
Things: An Essay in the Metaphysics
of Frege an dWittgenstein," on Thurs.,
June 13 at 11 a.m. pinm.2213 Angell
Full. Chairman: I. Mt, Cops.
John Dale Strobel, Music: Perform-
ance on Thurs., June 13 at 11 a.m. in
Rm. 3011 Scliool of Music. Chairman:
L. J. Stout.
Hamdi Ahmad Qafisheh, Education,
Dissertation: "English Pre-Nominal
'Modifiers and Corresponding Modern
StandardArabic Structuire.: A Con-
trastive Analy.sis," on Thurs ., Junie 1:3
at 12 noon in Rm. 206 Gunn Bldg., 506
E. Liberty. Chairman: W. G. Merhab.
Mahmoud Nadim Ahmed flasoun,
Civil Entgineering. Dissertation: "Be-
havior of Partially Prestressed Concrete
Members Reinforced with Combinations
of Prettressing Cables and Steel Bar',
of Different Grades," on Thurs.. June
13 at 2 p.m. in Rm. 305 W. Engrg. Co-
Chairmen: L. M. Legatski and W. S.
Rumman.

Peter Michael Frenzel, Germani:' Lan-
tuases and Literatures, Dissertation:
'The Episode in the Songs of Oswald
von Wolkenstein." on Thurs. June 13
at 3:15 p.m. in 1Im. 1082 Frieve Bidg.
C;hairmn : H. Schoiler,
Paul Gordon RieId. AMetallur-ical
Enineerin-. Dissertation: "Delorma
tion, Fracture, and Hardness Character-
istics of Compounds of Mlanganese withs
Group VI Elementrs," on Thurs., June
13 at 3:15 p.m. in Rm. 4219 E. Engre
Chairman: L. H. Van Vlack
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Mexico's struggle as fights Napoleon Ill's Maximilian,
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Starring BETTE DAVIS, PAUL MUNI, BRIAN AHERNE, CLAUDE
RAINS, JOHN GARFIELD, DONALD CRISP, MONTE BLUE.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY-7:00 & 9:05-ARCHITECTURE AUD.-75c

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is

After
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the new
love story by
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"SUPERIOR entertainment-

Loatdoa
for tldbfd .
and he loveliest
pbis olall
to'H~na
and hs
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Dial 5-6290
ENDS THURSDAY

warmth and wisdom make the

laughter even more enjoyable!"

-Life Magazine

LUCILLE BALL 1llENRY FONDA

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Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7,9 PM.

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