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June 08, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-08

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Soturdov..tune 9. 1:968;

POSSIBLE EYE DAMAGE:
Study approves provisional MACE use

3 .%,tIr dnV jiiint.pRL7f, 1.9V

A

(Continued from Page 1)
states that the authors of the
report favor the use of non-lethal
chemical or biological agents for
crowd and riot control over night
sticks, pistols or shotguns, Wheel-
er said that that kind of logic is
unacceptable since innocent by-
standers may be effected.
"Those of us who complained

about the indiscriminant, wide-
spread use of MACE also have
complained about the irrespon-
sible use of nitght sticks and guns
in the past because it is inherent
in this kind of thinking that the
danger of use of this kind of so-
called safe chemical weapon
would drastically set back racial
relations."

A look at . .
'The Young Girls of Rothelort'
by Henry Grix
The Young Girls of Rochefort is straight out of the thirties: a
musical comedy with lots of humdrum music, rows of luscious, leaping
chorus girls in diaphanous gowns, and an absolutely ridiculous plot.
In the sixties this could all be good fun, or at least good camp,
if it were played strictly for laughs. But director Jacques Demy keeps
trying to remind the viewer that his film belongs to the slick and
socially conscious sixties: his musical comedy includes shiny gadgetry,
a plea for world peace and a bewilderingly straight treatment of the
thin story.
"We're all looking for the ideal woman," Jeers one character.
We should laugh, but no one does because the man seems so sincere.
And. the heroineg' (there are three of them, of course) virtue isn't
worth worrying about at the hands of a cad because the young girls
of Rochefort were hardly raised next door.
Once again you grasp for the elements of spoof, but, the film
is too spiffy and lacks the degree of clumsiness and surprise that
elicits spontaneous laughter.
It's really too bad that there is so much wrong with this film
which has so much to recommend it. A few characters, including
pert Francoise Dorleac and George Chakiris (who was imported after
his smash success in West Side Story, which is still playing in Paris)
display the appropriate degree of overacting to be comic, but not
corny.
And the film is chromatically exciting: bold colors splash the
surrealistic, Fellini-like sets and cover the dancers who seem to be
hopping and skipping down every charming little street.,
But unfortunately most of the actors, including glamorous
Catherine Deneuve, are ,wistful, attractive and boring. And the
dancers aren't allowed to do much more than hop and skip. Norman
Maen's choreography is afflicted by a dreadful sameness - a same-
ness that afflicts the *hole movie. -
Every time Demy hits on a good song, dance or lyric he repeats
it until the viewer is mesmerized by color and melody.
Thus, everything good about the picture is wasted. There are
two good tunes in Michel Legrand's disappointing score; there are
too many tunes in The Young Girls of Rochefort. There is a lot of
talent in the international cast, but there is so much of it, no actor
gets time to excel.
Gene Kelly, a notable example of this waste, was sacrificed in
the brief part of the American in Rochefort who was looking for
someone "to transform my life and give it a sense." Kelly, who danced
so dazzlingly in many vintage Hollywood musicals, was given little
to do but grin and chew his French. So he did a little softshoe, got
Miss Dorleac and left to become an American in Paris.
I am not suggesting by all this that Demy should have avoided
a complicated, confusing plot, should have cropped down the sight
gags and eliminated the necessary banality of his characterizations.
But all this is tricky material for any director to work with and Demy
overdid.
Instead of making his comedy straight, Demy served up corny
drama. Instead of keeping his story going at the whirling pace of
his dancers, he lets it lag in sloppy, not funny sentimentality.
Demy ignored the rule he clung to in his beautiful Umbrellas of
Cherbourg: to make a schmaltzy subject appealing, you've got to
expose its refreshing simplicity for what it's worth.
The director seems to have hoped that color and camera work
would cover up the lack of substance in "The Young Girls." But it
was exactly this chaotic lack of complexity that was really supposed to
be funny.

He explained that if a police
department feels that it has a
safe weapon that it can use to
control riots effectively, the fur-
ther discussions of the basic issues
of police-Negro relations would
be diminished to the point of no
value.
City Councilman Leroy Cap-
paert told The Daily, "I think be-
fore use of MACE is reinstituted,
a very careful review of the report
by Council, the Human Relations
Commission and the Black Forum
should be made. Council should
have their assent before MACE is
used again."
Another problem with MACE,
he continued, is the unlikelihood
that the necessary safeguards
would be strictly observed by in-
dividual policemen. "Will an of-
ficer stop to be sure that the in-
tended recipient of MACE has all
his protective reflexes functioning,
and that he is far enough away
from the spray? I doubt it," he,
said.
Cappaert concluded that the
chemical and its very name-the
mace was the medieval symbol of
authority-makes the black com-
munity wary knd mistrustful of
MACE. "The apparent efficacy
coupled with the possible dangers
of MACE puts us on the horns of
a dilemma in deciding whether or
not to authorize its use," he said.
Councilman Len\ Quenon, al-
though favoring "non-lethal
methods of law enforcement," was
also concerned about possible lack
of restraint of police officers using
MACE.
"Even assuming that MACE is
the problem of the psychological
the problem of the phychological
aspect of police use of MACE. An'
officer who has racial hostility in
his background could overuse
MACE, disregarding the warnings
of the report and his training,}
holdinf a victim down, spraying
him to vent his hostilities," said
Quenon.
He noted that this problem ex-
The CHARGING
RHINOCEROUS.
of SOULr
Sun., June 9th,
Canterbury House
50c 9:00 P\.

tends beyond MACE, and called
for better police screening, train-
ing and supervision.
Although objections to MACE
by the lack community should
not be g ounds for vetoing use of
MACE, their views should be
taken into careful consideration
when considering the authoriza-
tion of MACE, Quenon added.
He was unable to comment on
the contents of the report, issued
today, because as yet he has not
been able to read it.
Fred McDonald, acting chair-
man of the Black Forum, said,
"Personally, my individual opin-
ion is MACE cannot be used until
its chemical composition has been
changed so that its use constitutes
no hazard to health. If it is made
hamless, it can be used, but not
before." The BlackuForum's of-
ficial position on the report and
further use of MACE will not be
available until Tuesday.
Rev. Russell Fuller of the
Human Relations commission said
the HRC will want to make a
careful and through study of the
report and all its implications,
both the possible physical harm
from MACE and the training of
police officers in its use before
making a statement.

4$:'ur .X'%%!:. ... ."r'" 3 .,%.... "'"+..vrr,,";"1 yrq.V@
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
trot accepted for .publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
r SATURDAY, JUNE 8.
Day Calendar
General Synod of the Reformed
Church in America -- First Session,
Lecture Hall, Rackham Bldg., 9:00 a.m.
Institute of Continuing Legal Edu-
cation Conference - "The Law of Corm-
puters: the Challenge of a New Tech-
nology", Registration, Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theater, 8:30 a.m.

Cinema Guild - Freddie Bartholo-
mew, Basil Rathbone, W. C. Fields in
"David Copperfield, Architecture Aud.,
'7:00 and 9' 5,
Department of Speech University
Players - G. B. Shaw's- "Major Bar-
bara", Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
8:00 p.m.1
SUNDAY, JUNE 9
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar -- "The Management of Managers
No. 61, North Campus Commons, 8:15
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:06 p.m.
General synod of the Reformed'
Church in America - First Session,
Lecture Hal, Rackham Bldg., 10:00 a.m.
Department of Speech University
Players - G. B. Shaw's "Major Bar-
bara", Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
8:00 p.m.
MONDAY, JUNE 10
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "The Management of Managers
No. 61, North Campus Commons, 8:15
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Institute on College and University
Administration -- Registration, Lobby,
Rackham Bldg., 8:15 a.m.
General Synod of the Reformed
Church in America - First Session,
Lecture Hall, Rackham Bldg., 9:00 a.m.
Astronomical Colloquium - Dr. M. P.
Fitzgerald, Physics-Astronomy Dept.,
University of Waterloo, "Interstellar
Absorption in the Environs of the
Sun," 807 Physics-Astronomy Bldg.,
4:00 p.m.

General Notices
TV Center Programs: On Sun., June
9 the following programs produced by
the TV Center will have their initial
telecast in Detroit :
11:00 a.m., WJBK-TV, Channel 2 -
"Writing for Children with Robert
Burch". The Georgia-born prize-win-
ning author of children's books tells
how and why he writes.
12:00 Noon, WWJ-TV,Channel 4-
After Eden: "The Garden' of Islam."
Islam was the third and last of the
great religions founded in the Fertile;
Crescent. Its rise is described by Prof.'
Clark Hopkins.
Doctoral Exams
Marilyn Wei-Shi Chen Chu, Chem-
istry, Dissertation: '"Optically Active
Complexes of 'Cobalt (III) with'
Branched Chain Tetradkntate Ligands,"
on Sat., June 8 at 10 a.m. in Rm. 3003
Chemistry Bldg. Co-Chairmen: J. Gen-
dell and C. F. Liu.
Charles Gerard Nelson, Germanic
Languages and Literatures, Disserta-
tion: "Liberation and Redemption in!
Konig Rother," on Mon., June 10 at"

3:15 p.m. in Rm. 1082 Frieze Bldg,
Chaiman H Scholler.
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings Received
by General Division by mail and phone
-please call 764-7460 for further infor-
mation:
Detroit Civil Service - Senior Ac-
countant, degree, spec. in acctg., and
bus. ad., exper., mn.age 26. Child care
Attendant, Man, h.s. degree min., col-
lege course work in psych., child be-
havior, will participate in in-sevice
trng., oppor. for further formal edu.
Utah Civil Service- Librarian, BA
level degree, 21,*hrs. lib. sci. plus 2 yrs
exper. or MALS. only. Building Con-,*
struction Inspector, degree req.
Rohm and Haas Company, Phila. Pa.
-PhD Phys. Chem. BS/MS Chem. BS
ME. BS/MS Sanitary Engr. Chemical
Engr. PhD. Pharmacology.
Raytheon Company, Waltham, Ma. -
Microwave and Power Tube division,
R & D engr, Sr. Engr. in Q'C. and nu-
merous other engrg. positions. Techni-
cal Writer, EDP personnel also.

' .r 7
r

ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in room 1011 SAB.
University Lutheran Chapel, June 8,
9:45 a.m., 1511 Washtenaw, Sermon:
"Answers for Intellectuals."
Graduate Outing Club - Hiking,
swimming, camping, etc. Meets every
Sunday afternoon at 2:00 p.m., at
Huron street entrance to Rackham
Building.
Libertarian League, June 9, 2:00 p.m.,
2x (MIMES), Union, discussion.

G MICHIGAN

DIAL
6-6290i

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Second class postage paid at Ann
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Daily except Monday during regular?
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Fall and winter subscription rate:
$4.50 per term by carrier ($5 by mail);
$8.00 for regular academic school year
($9 by mail).

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of "Gone With the Wind," from
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