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May 25, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, May 25, 1968

Herevisi o ted: Traces odisasterr

Soturdciv,. May 2..,...r 1968.
- Ii "
'ema in

EDITOR'S NOTE: CPS Vietnam
correspondent first wrote of the
destruction of Hue in March. Re-
cently he returned there. The fol-
lowing two articles are an account
of what he found.
By STEVE D'ARAZIEN
College Press Service
HUE, South Vietnam - The
Monsoon had lifted, the sun
beat down, and warmth had
replaced the damp cold of be-
fore. Much of the rubble had
been cleared from the streets
and they were now filled with
young boys in their schoolboy-
blue trousers and white short-
sleeve shirts and the beautiful,
bashful Hue girls in their spot-
less white ao dai dresses. Now
and then a ragged little boy in
a red Suzuki cap could be seen
and heard ringing a bill, adver-
tising his ice cream.
But in spite of the markedly
less dloomy atmosphere, evi-
dence of the recent disaster was
obvious.
Fresh graves lined the road-
side. Bodies were buried where
they fell, often in the little
parkways within inches of the
main road. Many were cov-
ered with little yellow flowers.
The traditional burying places
had- not been accessible when
it first became possible to bury
'> the dead. But perhaps soon the
bodies will be moved to family
plots, at least in cases where
the bodies have been identified.
The university studeits were
picking up their khaki uniforms
at the Faculty of Science build-
ing. Some looked proud to have
them. All South Vietnamese
students are expected to take
two weeks of military training,
plus one day a Week after that.
The training is more a morale
booster than a military maneu-
ver since the training consists
mainly of calisthenics and uni-
form-wearing.
The Saigon government has
been under pressure from
American officials to involve
the city-dwelling, middle and
upper-class Vietnamese who
have been able to avoid any
involvement in the war and
have even flaunted their af-
fluence and privileged status in
the midst of the war. It is

largely a symbolic gesture'
since the sons of the rich will
continue to receive their defer-
ments, even study in Europe if
they like, while their mothers
and fathers will tour the conti-
nent on buying sprees.
At the Imperial palace, which
had been the scene of the last
ditch fighting in Hue, the red
and gold, Chinese-styled; gate-
house had assumed a new pos-
ture. Leaning abruptly and pre-
cariously in several directions,
it had been heavily damaged.
In the once-beautiful South-
east corner of the Citadel, tin.
shacks had replaced the fine.
homes there before. These
shacks belonged to the former
homeowners. One large area of
the city, near Tran Cao Van
Street, had been bulldozed and
replaced with a series of bar-
tacks-like sheds housing about
200 families in fifteen foot wide
units.
The Venerable Quang Minh,
superior monk at the Bao Quoc
Pagoda in Hue, had just said
he was not interested in poli-
tics, but it was obvious that
some, of the Buddhist students
in Hue were.
Bao Quoc, where Tri Quang,
sp'ritual leader of Vietnam's
militant Buddhists had become
a monk, was a shambles.
"We thank our American
friends," one commented ironi-
cally. !'Life is a vale of tears,"
said another, quoting the Bud-
dha. The majority of the many
slogans on the Pagoda's.walls
were in Vietnamese, with a
smattering of French. But these
were in English.
Bao Quoc had been shelled
when the NLF had assembled
nearby. Though the soldiers
were not inside the pagoda, the
building itself was hit.
"We will leave it as it is to
remind ourselves," Quang Minh
said, explaining the rubble.
For the Buddhists life since
Diem has indeed been a vale of
tears. Both American and
South Vietnamese goverpment
authorities believe the Bud-
dhists have an annoying ten-
dency to make their peace with

the world. So Buddhism in Viet-
nam has had no peace in a
long while.
Relations between the Hue
Buddhists and the now-re-
moved province chief, Pham-
Van-Khoa, had been strained,
but it wasn't the Buddhists
fault, Quang Minh explained.
The Saigon government claims
that Thich Don Hau, the prom-
inent head of the Hue Buddhist
association, had gone willingly
with the NLF. Quang Minh ex-
plained that Venerable Don
Hau was being held hostage
because he had refused to fly
an NLF flag over his pagoda.
This contradicts Sqigon's claim
that the Buddhists are in
league with the Communists.
During the Tet battle, Quang
Minh said, the people had ex-
perienced difficulty in purchas-
ing rice from the government
because the government was
afraid the rice would fall into
enemy hands. But he doubted
the rumors of starvation were
true. ,
After the offensive, the peo-
ple were more afraid of the
NLF, the monk said. And be-
cause the people did not rise up
against the government, the of-
fensive was, in one respect, a
failure. There had been no
rush to join the revolutionary
committees which were intend-
ed to broaden the politicalnbase
of the NLF in preparation for
a coalition government.
"Most of the students here
did not join the NLF," Thich
Quanh Minh said.
The CHARGING
RHINOCEROUS
of SOUL
Sat., Sun., May 25, 26

-Associated Press
.warmth has replaced the damp cold of before"
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
1 .###~m igemsesa

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday,
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Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For

11:00 a.m., WJBK TV, Channel 2-
"Cures for Incurables." A look at quack
cures for arthritis and the fake cancer
cures which delay possible curative
treatment.
12:00 Noon, WWJ TV, Channel 4-
After Eden: "The Garden of Christ."
The rise of Christianity in the Fertile
Crescent and the spread of the Chris-
tian message to the western world
are traced by Prof. Hopkins.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Michael Evans,
Kalamazoo College, will speak on
"Short Term Elongation Responses
to C02, Tuesday, May 28, 1968 at 415,

3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings Received
by General Division by mail and phone
-please call 764-7460 for further infor-
mition:
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co., Chi -
cago, Ill.-Director of industrial Rela-
tions for a client located in midwest
city, supermarket chain with over 1,000
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Associated Press
". ..Buddhism has had no peace"
Dial 2-6264
SI -:20-3:20-5:20
7:20-9:25
NOW ! ner Mary Tyler,
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EXPERT WRITES
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more information call 764-9270. p.m., 1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg. Local Publisher-Assistant Editor for
professional magazine for teachers and
SATURDAY, MAY 25 administrators of industrial-arts and
D'octoralE~xamls vocational-industrial education. Desire
torl Eamiatin or;Joh 'Nl-bckrnd in this sort of education and
BayrCa dar ..ctral Emination, JohnWil g- ood abilities with somewhat technical
Day Caen ar 1.ctra Exl ~ ~~J~ tpisstrong bckn ilgl epe
Michigan Association for Children "The Continuing Education of Physi- wr o iti ng and familiarity wit
with Learning Disabilities-Registra- cians in the Community General Hos- printing processes.
tion, Lobby, Rackham Building, 8:00 pital," on Monday, May 27 at 9 a.m,
a.m. in Room 4018 U.H.S., Chairman: H. Y. Wisconsin Civil Service-Administra-
University of Michigan Players Chil- McClusky. tor, Division of state-Local Affairs, De-,
dren's Theatre Department of Speech Doctoral Examination fort William gree and admi:, exper with urban af-
---Reynard the Fox, Trueblood Theatre, Riess Peters, Education, Dissertation: fairs. pref. MA and 5 yrs.
2 p.m. "The Contribution of William Smith, Media Graphics, Inc., Mpls, Minn.-
Cinema Guild--The General: Archi- 1727-1803, to the Development of High- Business school or other graduate St-
tecture Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m. er Education in the United States," on dent sought for sales job leading to
Monday, May 27 at 10 a.m. at West management in area sales by fall,
SUNDAY, MAY 26 Council Room, Rackham, Chairman: maker m portable display set-ups.
J. S. Brubacher.
University of Michigan Players Chil- Doctoral Examination for: James Libbey Owens Ford Glass Company,
dren's Theater Department of Speech Richard Steidtmann, Geology, Disser- Toledo, Ohio-Marketing research Man-
--Raynard the Fox, Trueblood Theater, ta.tion: "Sedimentation, Stratigraphy ager with 3-5 years in Indust. Mkg. or
2 p.m. and Tectonic History of the Early Mktg. Res. Bcrknds in construction,
Eocene Pass Peak Formation, Central- transportation and furniture, housing
western Wyoming," on Monday, May furnishings good.
reneral Notices 27 at 1:30 p.m. in Room 2045 Natural
Resou rces, Chairman: L. L. Br!_-s. Interagency Board of U.S. Clii
TV Center programs: On Sunday, srs, ar nLr . Service Examiners continuously 'ac-
May 26 the following programs pro- cepting applications for computer pro-
duced by the TV yenter will have r ceiei grammers and computer systems an-
their initial telecast in Detroit: alysts, GS 9-12. Career booklet at the
a TT"~ TP^17 Af Ef~~~~~I f '1.~ i.... ~. v .,. 1-__

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k

IlIJUE 17UOF APPOINTMEINTS

Bureau, General Division.

ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES _
Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially
recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are
available in room 1011 SAB.
* w +
University Lutheran Chapel, May 26,
1968, 9:45 a.m., 1511 Washtenaw, Ser-
mon: "Complementing Faith by works,"
by Pastor Scheips.
Libertarian League, May 26th, 2:00
p.m., 2X (MIMES) Union, Kaffe-
Klatsch.
Seventh-day Adventist Student As-
sociation, book discussion, -May 25th,
2:30 p.m., 3545 SAB; discussant: Dr.
Roy Branson, "Harvery Cox: The Sec-
ular City."
Bach Club Meeting, Wed., May 29,
8:00 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.-
Program: a talk by Randolph Smith
on Bach's Sonata No. 6, and G Major
for violin and clavier, featuring a per-
formance by part of the Bach Bluc
Ensemble of the never-before-recorded;
Cantabile, ma un poco Adagio, and
Adagio of the earlier versions of this
work. For further information call
769-2922 or 769-1605.

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2ND FEATURE

I

11

You are cordially
invited to enjoy
a perfectly

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CHARLES K.
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JOSEPH L.
MANKIEWICZ'
felt
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Murder
HFormeriy
THE HONEY POT")
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