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May 23, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-05-23

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, May 23, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-Associated Press

Violence at San Francisco State sit-in

Kirk refuses amnesty

A look at. . .
'No Way To Treat a Lady'
by Daniel Okrent
IT'S A WEEKNIGHT in Ann Arbor, during the summer. You
don't have anything to do, of course. The University Musical
Society has a sparse summer schedule, and there's no PTP to
attract you. Generally, the selection of films is second-rate, 'as
the theater people seem reluctant to risk an expensive-to-rent
film because the major portion of their audience is home for
vacation. Still, there are a few semi-gems among the chaff. No
Way To Treat a Lady is a good way to treat a blah evening.
It is not a cinema masterpiece, for sure. Nor is it even good
as pictorial literature. The screenplay is adapted from a novel
by William Goldman, and the peaks and valleys of Goldman's
on again-off. again writing are evident. Familiar stereotypes
prance across the screen like Goldman's gang in Boys and Girls
Together and would be a bit bothersome, were they not treated
with the correct self-spoofing that Goldman is able to convey.
It has a Goldmanesque endirig, seemingly tacked on to the end
for want of anything better. But who cares: the whole thing is
fun while it lasts.
Much of the credit is due to Rod Steiger, who has been given
the chance to portray his incredible versatility. His seven roles
are almost autobiographic, as they seem to embody a film his-
tory of Steiger's wondrous career. He plays, mainly, a criminal
psychopath who uses various disguises to gain entry into the
homes of his intended victims, and many of them are brief
replays of some of the actor's excellent previous performances.
AT ONE MOMENT he is the convincingly flitty Joyboy that
he played in The Loved One, at the next he has the smooth
urbanity of Komarovski in Dr. Zhivago. Thrown in for extra
measure is a neat Barry Fitzgerald, and the other cameos show
that this man can squeeze gorgeous caricatures out of pat roles
like no other actor working today. We are even treated to a good
straight-facing of W. C. Fields.
What else? As Steiger skips about town strangling frumpy
single women, either widowed or otherwise unmarried, he is
chased by honest cop George Segal, whose frankly labeled Jew-
ish mother, played by Eileen Heckart, is a yiddishe mama of a
vastly improved and updated quality. Not a repeat of the common
fresh-from-the-pale Gertrude Berg type, George's mom is a
second-generation personification done up in kreplach, l1tkes,
and-accurately-bouffant hair aptly tipped with a steel-gray
beauty shop job. She's lovely.
LEE REMICK is ready-mix frosting, thrown in to satisfy
Segal's frustrated libido. Her MacLean's toothpaste wholesome-
ness, poorly mixed with hints of sophistication (she tells that
Randy Beautiful, whom she has been sleeping with for a while,
"wanted my body, not my mind") is nothing worth raving about.
Her breasts come through nicely in her first costume, though.
I haven't said much about the director, Jack Smight, because
he didn't do much. His technical repertoire consists of some
rather tedious jump-cuts, and quick zooms.,Every so often his
camera pans on an impressive police department telephone-
tracing switchboard. But he does show a sense for good sight
gags, he keeps up a quick pace to keep things from getting boring,
and he generally lets his actors show their skills fully as much
as they deserve.
Like most Steiger films, this one is worth something be-
cause it is, clearly, a Steiger film. Surely that alone is worth an
Azin Arbor summer night.

DAILY OFFICI

(Continued from Page 1)
budge, and on the .grassy campus
outside where perhaps 500 to 600
supporters and opponents of the
demonstrators milled about.
One reporter said that several
newsmen had observed policemen
kicking and clubbing students al-
ready knocked down.
A senior faculty committee also
condemned the latest outburst of
student disorder on the school's
Morningside Heights campus,
calling on all students to disasso-
ciate themselves from those "who
are clearly intent upon the de-
struction of the university."
The executive faculty commit-
tee said the action of students,
who barricaded Hamilton Hall
early yesterday was "destructive
of all efforts to create a climate
of mutual discussion."
The committee skid the action
was part of "a politics of confron-

tation" and that those engaging
in such politics "bear the major
responsibility for resort to the
civil authorities."
The Columbia Daily Spectator,
the student newspaper, criticized
the university administration in
a special edition for "repressive
measures.".
Deploring arson and violence,
the editorial said the administra-
tion has "failed to realize that
a broad base of students seek a
voice in the decision making pro-
cesses of the university."
The month-long student pro-
tests have resulted in 998 arrests
and more than 200 injuries. The
school suspended tall evening
classes yesterday and closed all,
academic buildings.
The holding of classes has been
left to the discretion of the vari-
ous departments, teachers and
students since the reopening of

Reston: Vandenberg,
Lady Bird, Hubert

the campus after the first police
raid April 30. However, some stu-
dents have been boycotting classes
ever since.
The c a m p u s demonstration
which began April 23, grew out
of student opposition to the uni-
versity's aid to the war effort, to
a proposed Columbia gymnasium
in a park separating the campus
from Harlem, and to university
disciplinary procedures.
Work on the gym Was sus-
pended. The students then de-
manded amnesty from discipli-
nary procedures, refusing to
budge from the five buildings they
held-until, in the predawn hours
of April 30-city policemen rout-
ed them in a violent confronta,-
tion that left 150 injured.
Student strike committees were!
organized, demands grew for anl
entire restructuring of the uni-
versity, with greater student-fac-
ulty participation in decisions.
. *
From Wire Service Reports
Police raided the San Francis-
co State College campus Tuesday
night to clear the administration
building of protesters and ar-
rested 27 students.
An orderly sit-in started in the
building during the afternoon.
The number of students dwindled
from 200 to 26 by night. The last
26 decided to remain in the build-
ing and volunteer arrest.
Leaders of the demonstrationI
said it was aimbd at ousting the
Air Force Reserve Officers Train-
ing Corps from campus and
changing the school's policies to
aid students from minority
groups.
The last person arrested was ledj
to the police wagon with a deep
head cut and claimed he was
struck by a police club while try-
ing to help a woman to safety.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which. The
Michigan Daily oassumes no editor-
ial responsibility, Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to-
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar }temns appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for, publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
Thursday, May 23
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"The Management of Managers
No. 59": North Campt~s Commons,
8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
Basic Firemanship Training. Course
it - Morning Session, Civil Defense
Center, 8:30 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business - "Managing the Pro-
grammed Learning Effort Seminar",
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Student Relations Committee Sem-
inar - Prof. Leo Levin, Vice Provost
fpr Student Affairs atrthe University
of Pennsylvania. "Restructuring of the
Office of Student Affairs," SGC Coun-
cil Rm., 3544 S.A.B., 2 p. m.
Biomechanics Department - High-
way Safety Research Institute Sem-
inar - James H. McElhaney, \ h.D.,
Professor of Theoretical and Applied
Mechanics, West Virginia University,
"The Stress Direction of Bone Growth",
1114 Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy, 3:30 .p.m.
Department of Civil Engineering
Seminar - Alan J. Miller, Ph.D., In-
stitute of Highway and Traffic Re-
search, UniversityofaNew South Wales,
Australia, "The Capacity and Operat-,
ing Characteristics of Signalized Inter-
sections", 311 W. Engrg. Bldg., 3:45 p.m.
Department of Speech Student Lab-
oratory-Theater - EugeneI onesco's
"Maid to Marry" and Harold Pinter's
"The Dwarfs", Arena Theater, Frieze
Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
General Notices
Astronomy Department Visitors'
Nights. Fri., May 24, 9:30 p.m., Aud. D,
Angell Hall. Dr. Peter A. Wehinger will
speak on "The Construction of Large
Telescopes." After the lecture the Stu-
dent Observatory on the fifth floor of
Angell Hall will be open for inspection
and for telescopic observations of Ju-
piter and a Star Cluster. children wel-
comed, but must be accompanied by
adults.

.....c::::xink;, editing, photography, layout art
following through publication, Oppor-
tunity to advance in Public Relations
or Personnel Administration. Engi. ma-
jor with 2-3 yrs. newspaper or Indus-
trial exper. is likely backrnd.
Thirty Eighth Judicial Distriot Cir
:":. :... cult Court, Monroe, Mich.-Male' adult
Probation Officer, BS/BA level degree
Doctoral req., full time.
City of Holland, Mich. - Civil engrg.,
E aminati s eligiblefor registration in State of
~'~F~t~Y Mich., previous exper. preferred,
D Richard Taliaferro Dasher, Music, ' TeacherCaorps iscurrently recruiting
Dissertation: "The Musical Program- college graduates, for new training pro-
ming of National Educational Tele- grams scheduled to begin late summer
vision," on Thurs., May 23 at 9:30 a.m. and early/ fall, prefer non-education
in Rm. 2277 School of Music. Chair- majors anxious to assist in overcrowd-
man: E. W. Troth. ed understaffed slum schools, two year
-graduate program combining tuition-
1 free study at a university with on-
PwfCem ent the-job training in poverty area schools
and communities.
I SUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS Champlain Valley Physicians Hos-
3200 SAB r pital, Plattsburgh, N.Y. - Clinical Bac-
GENERAL DIVISION teriplogist, respon. -to pathologist for
Current Position Openings Received bacteriol. investigation related to diag-
Sby Genera Division by mail and phone noss and treatment of patients and
-please call 764-7460 for further infor- for direction of infection control pro-
mation: gram: MS desired, BS acceptable with
University of Rochester, Rochester, good experience.
N.Y. - Editor for faculty/staff tab Local Association - Executive Di-
loid produce4 11 times yearly, respon. rector, degree and exper. in education,
psychology, social work or rel. flds.,
¢;; t :: ...:*..:::!! : e.r:. s ,..r,... ;direct exper. in area of mental retard-
ation, exper. in admin. or community
ORGA IZA ION rgaization,
ORGAN IZATION avalOrdnance Station, Forest Park,
Ill. - Auditor, GS-9 position, reviews
NOTI Sacctg. reports covering acctg. and cost
acctg. under industrial acetg. system.
:.::.::::::r , ;r ,r.,...,r,"-f" , r Photographer, sci. and technical, sup-
.-. .,::" r~:""::., " "::""::....r..port for tech. Applied Research and
Use of this column for announce Engrg. Departments. Various," cameras
Use f tis olun fr anouce-I icl. "Fastex" Wollensak 16-mm high
ments is available to officially speed movie camera.
recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are Polak's Frutal Works, Inc., Meddle-
available in room,1011 SAB. town, N.Y. - Head, Food Technology,
a flavors, product dev. bckrnd. in. food
Christian Science Organization Tes- induStry, incharge of food lab, pref.
timony meeting ,Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Rm. chem. degree and min. & years products
3545 S.A.B. or R & D exper., keen sense of taste
* * and smell required.
Bach Club meeting, Thurs., May 23, Mann Manufacturing Inc., El Paso,
8:00 p.m. Guild. House, 802 Monroe, Texas - Mechanical/industrial engi-
speaker: Dale Bonge, "The unseen neer for manuf. of boys jeans and
Structure in Bach's Music," for fur- slacks. BS in ME with IE option, some
ther information please call 769-2922 or bus. ad. bckrnd, helpful, manuf, and
769-1605. design exper. in garment industry pre-
for gathering news, interviewing, writ- ferred . my
El .. I

4'

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MON.-FRI.
Murder 7:10
Lady 9:20
1:00-5:15-9:20
:20-7:45

SAT.: Murder 5:15-9:20
Lady: 3:20-7:45

SUN.: Murder
Lady 3

2ND FEATURE

(Continu'ed from Page 1)
"Ronald Reagan is Barry
Goldwater from the late, late
show ..."
Reston said he thought Hum-
phrey hated the war in response
to a question by a student
whether Humphrey as Presi-
dent would "continue the divis-
iveness in our society."
"I can't conceive in my mind
what you would do as Vice
President under Johnson," Res-
ton retorted. "You couldn't go
into his office and tell him you
intended to go to Ann Arbor
and denounce his policies.
"Images don't count," Res-
ton continued. 'Facts do. And
the facts about Hubert Hum-
phrey are that he has always
had to choose between loyalty
to the President and support of
his policies. He chose loyalty.
I have always thought he nated
the war."
When asked later whether
his statement was based on
speculation or first-hand infor-
mation, Reston seemed to mis-
understand the question. "I
don't want to be dogmatic
about this," he said. But, when
pressed, he said, "I do have
first-hand knowledge of what
Hubert Humphrey think.."
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
CHHRLToE HESTON
*RHEIMI n SCHELL
COU "TERPDIN'
TECHNICOLOR' . A UNIvcRSAL PICTURE
C O-FEATUR-- ---
HIDHIEY TREUR r'
, lLaS HGURRI
"A MATTER
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Later, a student asked why
President Johnson withdrew
from presidential contention.
"Are yog married?" Reston
shot back. The a u d i e n c e
laughed. "Lyndon Johnson
withdrew because he had to
choose between the Presidency
and Lady Bird." 'Again, the
audience laughed.
"What does that mean','" the
student demanded.
"Lady Bird is the most re-
markable, underrated woman
in the White House in triis cen-
tury. She has worked hard to
persuade him that he couldn't
govern the country and save
his life, that he ought to go
home to the ranch."
R~ ~

including
BEST ACTOR, ROD STEIGER
1R SIDNEY POITIER ROD STEIGER
THE NORMAN JEWISON WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
IN TIE ST OFTY NIGHT"
COLOR by Detuxe n linted Artbstm

On Screen-
Tennessee Williams'
CAT ON A
HOT TIN ROOF
With Paul Newman
and Elizabeth Taylor.
Tomorrow and Saturday
7:00 & 9:05
Architecture Aud.
75c

You are cordi,
invited to eni
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ally CHARLES K.
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TONIGHT
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TONIGHT at
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Peter Myers-
Chairman of P.A.R. (
Against Racism) spea

Racism-A White Problem

r
I
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Friday and Saturday-
THREE ON A MATCH
(trio from Rochester, New York) returning by
overwhelming popular demand to sing original and
contemporary folk and folk-rock music.

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fJ 14 1V1 Ntr
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Sc,w.pvy CHARLES WILLIAMS-oirwwe~by RON WINSTON PW.,db'ySIAN MARGULIES
'-' TECHNICOLOR®1 A UNIVERSAL PICTURE

i

I 1

... ,_ _

1 WIN we - U, - - -q- , , %

_

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