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January 06, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RGE ROUNDUP:
NSF, AEC Grant Research Funds

rants form the National~
nce Foundation and the Atom-
nergy Commission for scien-
research and imljrovement
eaching of science has high-
ted events at several campuses
ntly.
ALAMAZOO - The National
once Foundation has granted
tern Michigan University A
1 of $141,000 to conduct three
itutes in the summer of this
r.
he institutes will be open to
for high school teachers of
nce, physics and mathematics.
he chief aim of the institute for
,hers of physics is to enrich
subject matter background of
sics teachiers in community
junior colleges. An intensive

program of lectures, demonstra-
tions, laboratory experiences, and
field trips has been planned in
the areas of chvisical and modern
physics.
An institute will also be open
to 60 participants interested in
mathematics. This institute is de-
signed to improve subject matter
competence of the teachers,
* * *
TOLEDO-The National Science
Foundation announced a grant of
$62,000 to the University of Tole-
do to finance an institute in biol-
ogy next summer for high school.
teachers.
The purpose of the institute
will be to acquaint and aid high
school teachers in supplying speci-
mens for their classes and to im-

trborne TV Instruction Plans

> Start Demonstration

Series

By SANDRA JOHNSON
The Midwest Program on Air-
irne Television Instruction plans
begin its demonstration per-
d of telecasts ont January 30.
Elementary, high school and
liege classes will be telecast on
deo tape from a plane 23,000 feet
ove Montpelier, Indiana.
Sixteen teachers from across
eminar Studies
Personnel Report
The thirteenth annual Person-
l ~Techniques Seminar will con-
nue tonight at 9:00 p.m. in the
ichigan Union.
The two-day seminar, under the
spices of the Bureau of Indus-'
al Relations, will discuss "Es-
blishing and Conducting a Com-
ny Personnel Research Pro-
am "
The speakers will be Stanley
Seashore, a program director'
the Survey Research Center,
id Philip Ash, assistant to the
ce-president, industrial relations
the Inland Steel Company.

the country have been chosen to
instruct the half-million children
who will participate in the edu-
cational experiment.
Completing Lessons
At present, the teachers are
completing lessons on video tape
in one of the six producing cen-
ters.
Classrooms in Michigan, Indi-
ana, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and
Wisconsin are being equipped to
receive the Programs.
The demonstration telecasts
which are beginning this month
will continue through May 25.
The 16 teachers picked for the
regular program will also take
part in this spring experimental
period.
On the elementary level, classes
will be offered in science, arith-
metic, arts, music and French.
Two Michigan teachers are among
those chosen to teach the third
through sixth grades.
Frenchman To Teach
Zelik Zeff, a native French-
man, will be teaching conversa-
tional French. Detroit children
have already received instruc-
tion from him on the Detroit
public schools television teaching
program, "Boni our les enf ants."
Another Michigan teacher,
Myles M. Platt, will be taking part
in the high school television in-
struction. His course, "One Nation
Indivisible" will deal with the
Constitution, great American per-
sonalities, some of the functions
of democracy and operations of
government from city hall to the
national capitol.
Other high school courses will
be given in geography, history, and
biology.
lU

prove the technical knowledge of
high school teachers.
All major facilities of the Uni-
versity will be available to the
instructors and teachers enrolled
in the course.
* * *
ITHACA, New York. - Cornell
University has been selected by
the National Science Foundation
to receive grants in support of
the 1961 summer institute for high
school and college teachers.
Summer institutes in two areas,
chemistry and space science, will
be offered at the university. The
grant for chemistry will total
$43,600. The grant for the study
of space science totals $54,900.
The aim of the program, design-
ed for high school and college
teachers, is to increase classroom
effectiveness. The courses are de-
signed to refresh the teachers'
foundamental knowledge, acquaint
them with _new developments in
their fields, and familiarize them
with new approaches in presenting
subject matter.
* , *S
HEMPSTEAD, New York-The
Atomic Energy Commission has
granted $26,000 to Hofstra College
for the purchase of nuclear de-
tection and measurement equip-
ment. The allocation, received this
semester, will enable the Physics
and Engineering departments to
expand their laboratory programs.
Dr. Harold Clearman, chairman
of the physics department, said
"the grant will be used to improve
nuclear laboratory work in atomic
physics. In September 1961 a
laboratory course in nuclear
physics for engineers will be of-
fered . . , Within a year or so,
additional advanced courses uti-
lizing the equipment should be
prepared. The equipment will also
be available to honor students
doing independent work under
departmental supervision."
One of the items -to be pur-
chased will be a neutron howitzer.
Scintillation detectors, scalers, and
other radiation measuring instru-
ments will also be purchased.

The committee members will
explain the implications of the
SGC decision requiring sororities
and fraternities to submit copies
of the membership clauses of
their constitutions along with any
written or unwritten agreements
concerning membership selection.
Miss Greenberg urged Panhel
members to come prepared with
any questions they would like to
ask the committee and to be very
frank in expressing themselves.
She encouraged sororities to in-
clude "as much as you yourselves
know" about membership prac-
tices in the statements submitted
to the committee,.
Miss Greenberg explained that
the committee might read the con-
stitutional clauses and statements
submitted to it even though no
charges of violation have been
brought. A reading of this type,
however, would include clauses
submitted from every house and
would in most cases be only a
check to make sure that all re-
quired information had been fur-
nished.
Gustave To Give
Recital off Violin
Prof. Gustave Rosseels, violinist,
of the music school, will give a
sonata recital at 8:30 p.m. Jan.
9 in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
He will be accompanied by Prof.
Wallace Berry, also of the music
school, on the piano.

Committee
To Explain
SGC Ruling
By JUDY OPPENHEIM
Panhellenic Association Presi-
dent Barbara Greenberg, '61, in-
formed Panhel members yester-
day that the Student Government
Council Committee, on Member-

Educational Aid Group
Sets Student Loan Plan

STATE COMMISSION:

ship in Student
will attend next
Panhel meeting.,

Organizations
Wednesday's

By CNTHIA NEU
Another avenue of escape from
the problems of financing a col-
lege education is being constructed
for University and other college
students in the state by the new
Higher Education Assistance Au-
thority apointed last November.
Regent Eugene B. Power, a
member of the authority, said the
University could probably use
$600,000 to $700,000 in additional
funds for students under the long
term, low interest loan program
planned by the group.
The state group has held an
organizational meeting and is now
studying the methods used by
similar groups in other states.
If they follow plans now used
Blood .Driveg
Raises $38.2
For Negroes
A total of $382 was collected
from the blood drive to , raise
funds for the Negroes in Fayette
County, Mary Wheeler, '61, indi-
cated.
Miss Wheeler is president of the
University Chapter of the Nation-
al Association for the Advance-
ment of Colored People, which
aided in the program.
The Blood for Fayette County
Committee, which initiated the
drive, sent the money directly to
the Congress of Racial Equality
in New York to be distributed
by CORE to meet the needs of
Negroes suffering from economic
sanctions by the local white com-
munity.
In a letter to the committee
CORE disclosed that it received
requests from several communi-
ties over the nation for informa-
tion on setting up similar blood
drives to continue the aid to these
people.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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4

DIAL NO8B-6416
Brigitte
BARDOT
ACOME DANCE
WITH ME"
Based on the novel
"The Blonde Died Dancing"
by Kelley Roos
in EASTMAN COLOR

Orchestras
by
B ud-Mor

.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Mihigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. N o ti c e s should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 P.M. two days preceding
publication.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 5
General Notices
MIDYEAR GRADUATION
EXERCISES
January 21, 1961
To be held at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Aud.
Reception for graduates, their rela-
tives and friends in Michigan League
Ballroom at 4:00 p.m. Please enter
League at west entrance.
Tickets: Three to each prospective
graduate, to be distributed from Mon.,
Jan. 9, to 1:00 p.m. Sat., Jan. 21, at
Cashier's Office, first floor lobby, Ad-
min. Bldg.
Academic Costume: Can be rented
at Moe Sport Shop, 711 North Univer-
sity Ave. Orders should be placed im-
mediately.
Assembly for Graduates: At 1:00 p.m.
in Natural Science Aud. Marshals will
direct graduates to proper stations,
Graduation Announcements, Invita-
tions, etc.: Inquire at Office of Student
Affairs.
Programs: To be distributed at Hill
Aud.
Doctoral degree candidates who quali-
fy for the Ph.D. degree or a similar
graduate degree and WHO ATTEND
THE GRADUATION EXERCISES will
be presented a hood by the University.
Hoods given during the ceremony are
all Doctor of Philosophy hoods. Those
receiving a doctor's degree other than
the Ph.D. may exchange the Ph.D. hood
for the appropriate one immediately af-
ter the ceremony. Such exchange may
be made in 1139 Natural Science Bldg.
after the recessional march.
Doctoral Foreign Language Examina-
tions: The last doctoral foreign lan-
guage reading examinations for this
semester will be given on Jan. 23.
Since space in the examination room is
limited, those graduate students wish-
ing to take the examinations at the
end of this semester will be wise to

sign up for a date with the Foreign
Bldg., as soon as possible. The next
screening examination will be sched-
uled for some time during the second
week of the spring semester.
Fellowship and Scholarship Applica-
tions for Graduate School will be ac-
cepted through 4:00 p~m., wed., Feb.
1. All credentials, including transcripts
and letters of recommendation must be
received by this time. Late applications
cannot be considered, and the dead-
line will not be extended. '
The Cranbrook School calls atten-
tion of the faculty to its scholarship
competition for boys entering. any
grade from 7 to 11 next September.
Deadline for application is March 1.
Information is on file in the Fellow-
ship Office, 110 Rackhamn Bldg.
Summary of Action Taken by
Student Government Council
at its Meeting of Jan.4, 1961
Approved: The minutes of the pre-
vious meeting.
Approved: The re-organization of
the Student Government Council In-
ternational Activities structure (vol. 6,
p. 46), after amendments were made
to the main motion.
Approved: That a letter be sent to
the faculty stating the Council's opin-
ion regarding comprehensiveexamina-
tions and other means of providing a
base for thoughtful analysis of a stu-
dent's field of concentration.
Activities Approved: Feb. 10-12, Mi-
chigan Union and Women's League,
Winter Weekend, ekiing trit, Holiday
Hills-Traverse City, Mich. (The Union
and League will make complete ar-
rangements for the students and trans-
portation will be provided by Univer-
sity buses.)
Approveal Denied: The Council de-
cided Not to give its approval to the
following activity: Dec. 15, Political
Issues Club, movie and speaker on
HUAC In San Francisco, Union, 7:30
p.m.
Recommendations: Student Govern-
ment Council reviewed the Procedures
of the Conmitte on Membership in
Student Organizations and returned it
to them with the Council's recommen-
dations for changes.

The following student-sponsored so-
cial events have been approved for the
coming week-end. Social chairman are
reminded that requests for approval
for social events are due in the Office
of Student Affairs not later than 12
o'clock noon on Tuesday prior to the
event.
Jan. 7, 1961
Alpha Delta Phi, Record Dance, 556
South State.
Beta Theta Pi, Dance, 604 So. State
Delta Chi, Theme Party, 1705 Hill St.
Delta Tau Delta, Party, 1928 Geddes
Gomberg House, Sock Hop, So. Quad
Phi Epsilon Pi, Dance, 1805 Wash-
tenaw.
Phi Gamma Delta, Dance, 707 Oxford
Phi Sigma Kappa, Party, 1043 Bald-
win.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Pajama Party,
1408 Washtenaw.
Tau Epsilon Phi, Toboggan Party,
Cass Benton Park.
Theta Chi, Record Party, 1351 Wash-
tenaw.
Theta Delta Chi, Casino Party-Band
Dance, 700 So. State.
Trigon Fraternity, After Skating Par-
ty, 1617 Washtenaw.
Wenley House, Dance, West Quad.
Events Friday...
Faculty Recital: Prof. Richard Miller,
tenor, accompanied by Prof. Eugene
Bossart, piano, will give a public re-
cital on Friday, Jan. 6, at 8:30 p.m. in
Aud. A.
Doctoral Examination for Mae Lee
Maskit Goffman, Psychology; thesis:
"Management of Aggression in Pre-
adolescent Girls: Its Effect on Cer-
tain Aspects of Ego Functioning," Fri.,

2

DIAL
2-6264
IECnIELO

TODAY
AND
SATURDAY

I

rse- DrAMRR BROS.
,taa. ,,oWARNER BROS.

* STARTS SUNDAY *

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER

'+P Nl I a 4
I{IIIN 1'

k

I

I

A crazy, matrimonial mix-up
that raises the screen's mirth-
rate to a new high

IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU, BUT IF IT
DOES... MAN, YOU ARE IN TROUBLE!

-Organization
Notices
Cong. Disciples E & R Stud. Guild,
Cost Luncheon Discussion, Jan. 8, 11-2
p.m., 524 Thompson.
Newman Club, Dance, Jan. 6, 8:30
p.m.; Dinner-put on by grad, students,
Jan. 8, 6 p.m.; 331 Thompson.
* * *
Sailing Club, Work on Boats, Jan. 7,
10 a.m., 537 SAB.

CAFE GALERIE
PRESENTS

BOB HOPE LUCILLE BALL
*A PANAMA & FRANK
PRODUCTION

A Festival of Musical Premieres
Fri., Feb. 24 L. Berio Ensemble
Sat., Feb. 25 Solos, Duos, Trios
Fri., March 3 Paul Jacobs, Pianist
Sat., March 4 Orchestra-Wayne Dunlap

T.V., Radio, Concert and
Recording Star
CISCO HOUSTON
FOLK MUSIC AND
BALLADS
Open nightly from 8:00 P.M.;
closed Mondays
19940 LIVERNOIS, DETROIT 21,
UN 2-4455

Admission $5 for series, $3 for weekend,
$1.77 for 1 concert (DAC members 1.0%off)
Tickets at Marshall's Book Shop

.i

Lp

S.G.C. Chatma qaild
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Erich von Stroheim's "THE LAST BRIDGE"
"GREED" A
KAADI A Cr"LiGI I RDDKlADMrir^I~'Vi

; Z

/ -r 4:, s

I

II

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