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January 04, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-01-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U

Bdan

Perform

NELSON DIES:
Family To Hold Rites
For Retired Professor

'or Kennedy
The Wayne State University;
arching band was chosen Sunday
represent Michigan at the Jan.
inauguration of President-elect
hn F. Kennedy.
The decision to send the WSU
isicians to Washington was
ade at the Inaugural Breakfast4
Lansing. Both Michigan State
aiversity and WSU had requested
e assignment and, contrary to
previous statement by Governor-
ct John B. Swainson that the
SU band would make the trip,
SU was selected by the drawing
lots.,
According to Neil M. Staebler,
ichigan Democratic Party chair-
an, the University had declined
e opportunity to apply.
The WSU band will leave De-
at Jan. 19' and travel by train
Washington. Members will par-
ipate in the parade along with
e other state bands
Approximately 100 band mem-
rs will make the trip, Prof. An-
Jo Cucci, Director of Bands at
S U, said.

Prof. Emeritus J. Raleigh Nel-
son, founder of The UnlvetsityI
International Center, diedSunday
at the age of 87.
He suffered a stroke several
weeks ago and remained in a
coma until his death Sunday at
his home in Ann Arbor.
Prof. Nelson joined the Uni-
versity in 1908 and served as a
faculty member for 35 years prior
to his retirement in 1943.
He was a pioneer in the de-
velopment of language instruction
for engineering students at the
college level, and from 1932 to
1936 served as chairman of the
engineering English department.
In 1938 he was named the first
director of the newly founded In-
ternational Center, and held this
position until his retirement.
In 1940 President Franklin D.
Roosevelt cited Prof. Nelson for
his contributions to international
student exchange.
Prof. Nelson was named "one of
the 20 outstanding authors of
Michigan" by the English Club of
Detroit. Among his published

City Group
To Consider
Housing Aid
A public meeting for those to be
affected by urban renewal in Ann
Arbor will be held this month, the
City Council decided last night.
The Council earlier in the month
asked the state for $6,000 to match
a $6,000 federal grant. The Coun-
cil has signed a $12,000 contract
with an Indiana firm which is
making the surveys necessary for
final federal approval of the pro-
ject.
The city will receive aid under
the National Housing Act of 1954.
The idea was first conceived for
Ann Arbor in 1955, and was spear-
headed during Prof. Samuel Elder-
sveld's single term as mayor,
In March 1959 a "workable pro-
gram" was approved by the Coun-
cil. The following November Coun-
cilman Lloyd Ives proposed the
appointment of a private con-
sulting firm to "review and make
recommendations on scope of re-
habilitation effort required, areas
of city needing attention, types of
rehabilitation effort appropriate,"
and other details.

LIQUOR LICENSES:
'U' Directory of Minors"
To Limit Illegal Sale

Selection o

J. RALEIGH NELSON
. founded International Center
works are "A Lady Unafraid,"
"Writing the Technical Report,"
and "From Sunny Pastures." At
the time of his death he was
writing a second novel.

Viewed By Staeble

All Ann Arbor beer and wine
licensees who apply will be grant-
ed liquor licenses, if they meet
legal requirements, the City Coun-
cil decided last week.
And Dean of Men Walter B.
Rea announced that the Univer-
sity has developed a "secret
weapon" to limit illegal student
drinking. It has prepared a Di-
rectory of Minors which tavern
owners can refer to, rather than
depending on ID cards, which
have been shown by experience
to be alterable even though they
are enclosed in plastic.
The new plan is the result of
an agreement between Dean Rea
Two Students
"1' o t11d n-Plead Guilty
To Larceny
Two University students involv-
ed in a fight in which a police-
man's leg was broken have plead-
ed guilty to larceny charges and
are free on $100 bonds.
Michael Toumajian, '61 BAd.,
and Franklin E. Wilson, Jr., '64,
were spotted by a police officer
stationed at a local apartment
house to check on the theft of
Christmas ornaments during De-
cember.
The oficer saw Toumajian enter
the apartment lobby and take a
Christmas tree on display there.
When he arrested him a group
of about 20 other students ap-
peared and tried to pull Touma-
Jian from the policeman's hold.
In the struggle, Wilson, who
was nearby, fell on the ground
with Toumajian, and a few sec-
onds later a squad car appeared,
too late to apprehend the other
students.
Toumajian was taken to the
county jail and booked. Wilson
was arrested later and charged
with larceny.

and the Tabletop Licensees Con-
gress in mid-November to pre-
vent illegal consumption -"as far
as possible."
The Congress' president, An-
thony Preketes, said the close co-
operation of all concerned was
needed for "the welfare of the
student body in general and the,
welfare of the licensees."
About 23 of the present 27 beer-
wine bars are expected to seek
liquor licenses, including all the
traditional student gathering
places. A maximum of 32 licenses
is allowed the city under state
law.
Mayor Cecil 0. Creal, speaking
at a December 27 "safety ban-
quet" of the county Table-Top
Congress, advised the group's
members to 'brighten up your
places and run good establish-
ments, then come in and ask for
an extension of hours,'"
The hours question promises to
be controversial when it comes up,
and apparently Creal favors an
extension of the present midnight
closing hours on weekdays, as
does Dean Rea.
Creal called liquor by the glass
"something that we have to rec-
ognize in a progressive commu-
nity." In pre-election statements,
he expressed the personal opinion
that the proposal would be de-
sirable.
Creal Suggests
Rental Of Hall
Mayor Cecil 0. Creal of Ann Ar-
bor has suggested that the present
City Hall building be leased at
low cost to United Fund agencies
when the municipal government
moves to its new quarters.
Creal asked City Administrator
Guy C. Larcom, Jr. to have the
52-year-old building appraised. If
it is not too valuable, the City
Council will be asked to consider
the plan.

By BUEL TUAPNELL
John (Joe) Collins, '58, presi-
dent of the Student Government
Council for three semesters, will
probably be the new State Demo-
cratic Chairman, present State
Chairman Niel Staebler indicated.
He is the choice of Governor-
elect John Swainson for the un-
salaried job, Staebler said and
"the governor's choice is usually
recognized."
Staebler described Collins as
having "a good balance of prac-
ticality and high-mindedness. He
has done fine things as Jackson
County Chairman, his present po-
sition."
No Trouble
Several Democratic oficials have
indicated that Collins should have
no trouble getting elected at the
StateDemocratic Convention in
February.
Collins refused to state posi-
tively that he will be elected to the
position, although he is "flatter-
ed" by Swainson's choice.
He said that his experience on
SGC certainly helped him reach
his present position.
"Good President"
Roger Seasonwein, '61, called
Collins "an exceedingly good pres-
ident of the Council and a person'
who appeared earmarked for suc-
cess even, in his student days."
Seasonwein. is the only remaining

SGC member who serv
Collins.
"Joe will work coopera
do a good job for the to
munity as well as the De
Party," Mrs. Ruth T.
former SGC secretary, sa
She characterized Co
"enthusiastic, responsib
willing to work." Even as
man, he was known as
could get jobs done, she s
William J. Adams, '57,
president the term beforE
renpmbers him as a "f
ing individual, rather tha
tive political- thinker."
Adams said C6llins did
destined for a high polit
tion. "I had always th
Collins as being somewl
servative until this fall."
Administrative Assista
ley Levy, who 'was forr
the Council, said thai
would have to be an "exc
ly well-qualified indivi
reach this position, ar
"hopeful that Collins w
good job for the state."
Collins, a 26-year old
insurance man, managed
cessful statewide camps
won William K. McInall;
on the University Boarc
gents in 1959.

Z'i4 1. 'I l. i" } .4+w1M" r1{i "sW'a {e. 'a ? '.514. t {f'.ti1

DBULLETIN

............

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. N o ti c e s should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4
General Notices
Attention January Graduates: College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts,
School of Education, School of Music,
School of Public Health, and School of
Business Administration: Students
are advised not to request grades of I
or X in January. When such grades are
absolutely imperative, the work must
be made up in time to allow your in-
structor to report the make-up grade
not later than 8:30 a.m., Mon., Feb. 6.
1961. Grades received after that time
may defer the students' graduation un-
til a later date.
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishingI
to recommend tentative January grad-
iates from the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, for honors or
high'honors should recommend such
students by forwarding a letter (in
two copies; one copy for Honors Coun-
cil, one copy for the Office of Registra-
tion and Records) to the Director, Hon-
ors Council, 1210 Angell Hall, by 4:00Y
p.m., Fri., Feb. 3, 1961.
Teaching departments in the School;
of Education should foreward letters
directly to the Office of Registration
and Records, 1513 Admin. Bldg., by
8:30 a.m., Mon., Feb. 6, 1961.
MIDYEAR GRADUATION
EXERCISES
To be held at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Aud
Reception for graduates, their- rela-
tives and friends in Michigan League
Ballroom at 4:00 p.m. Please enterI
League at west entrance.
Tickets: Three to each prospective
graduate, to be distributed from Mon.,
Jan. 9, to 1:00 p.m. Sat., Jan. 21, at
Cashier's sOffice, first floor lobby, Ad-
min. Bldg.
Academic Costume: Can be rented
at Moe Sport Shop, 711 North Univer-
sity Ave. Orders should be placed im-
mediately.
Assembly for Graduates: At 1:00 p.m.
in Natural Science Aud. Marshals will
direct graduates to proper stations.
praduation Announcements, Invita-
tions, etc.: Inquire at Office of Student
Affairs.
Programs: To be distributed at Hill

all Doctor of Philosophy hoods. Those
receiving a doctor's degree other than
the Ph.D. may exchange the Ph.D. hood
for the appropriate one immediately af-
ter the ceremony. Such exchange may
be made in 1139 Natural Science Bldg.
after the recessional march.
Agenda
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
Jan. 4, 1961 'r:30 p.m.
Council Room Constituents' Time
9:00
Min.utes of previous meeting.
Officer Reports: Presi;ent, letters,
letter on Regulation and Procedure.
Exec. Vice-Pres., Interim Action, Big
10 Student Body Pres. Conference. Ad-
min. Vice-Pres. Treasurer, Financial Re-
port.
Special Business: Procedures of Com-
mittee on Membership in Student Or-
Old Business: Revision of Interna-
tional Activitites Structure, Opinion on
Comprehensives in Literary College.
Standing Committees: Recognitions
Committee, Latin American Student
Assn., John Barton Wolgamot Socity,
Ad Hoc Committees and Related
Boards:
New Business: Change in Agenda
Form.
Members and Constituents' Time.
Announcements
Adjournment
PLANS FOR MID-YEAR GRADUATION
EXERCISES
Sat., Jan. 21, 1961, 2:00 p.m.
TIME OF ASSEMBLY-1:15 p.m.
(except noted)
PLACES OF ASSEMBLY
Members of the Faculties at 1:15
pin. in Rm. 2082, second floor, Natural
Sciences Bldg., where they may robe.s
Regents, Ex-Regents, Deans and oth-.1
er Administrative Officials at 1:15 p.m.
in the Botany Seminar Room 1139,
Natural Science Bldg., where they may
robe.I
Students of the various Schools and
Colleges in Natural Science Bldg. as
follows:
SECTION A-Literature, Science and
the Arts-front part of aud., west sec-
tion.
Education-front part of aud., center
section.
Architecture-front part of aud. eastI
section.
Law-front part of aud. east section
(behind Architecture).
SECTION B-Graduate-rear part of
aud. with doctors at west end.
Public Health-Room 2004.
Flint College-Room 2004 (behind
Public Health),.
SECTION C - Engineering-Room
2054.
Business Administration-Room 2071,
Dental-Room 2033 (North End).
Nursing-Room 2033 (South End).
Natural Resources-Room 2033 (South
End).
Music-Room 2023.
Social Work-Room 2023 (behind Mu-
sic).
Events Today
Doctora Examination for George Ma-i
cinko, Geography; thesis: "Types aend
Problems of Land Use in the Columbia
Basin Project Area Washington," Wed.,,
Jan. 4, 210 Angell Hall, at 3:00 p.m. C.
M. Davis, Chairman.
Doctoral Examination for Alan Cas-
sels, History; thesis: "Mussolini's For-
eign Policy: The First Years. 1922-
1924," Wed., Jan. 4, 3609 Haven Hall, at
8:30 a.m. Chairman, H. M. Ehrmann.
Doctoral Examination for Merrel
Richard Stockey, Education; thesis: "A
Comparison of the Effectiveness of
Group-Counseling, Individual-Counsel-
ing, and Employment amiong Adolescent
Boys with Adjustment Problems,"
Wed.,,}Jan. 4, 1600 University Elemecn-
tary School, at 12:00 noon. Chairman,
W. A. Ketcha, i
Doctoral Examination for Chester
Walter Murphy, Education; thesis: "A
Study of Tensiometer Strength in iBoys
Six to Eleven Years of Age," Wed., Jan.
4, (Lab) P. E. M. Bldg., at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, P. A. Hunsicker.
Doctoral Examination for Russell Ray
Baker, Education; thesis: "Program
Prov ions in Michigan Junior High

Schools for Superior Students in Math-
ematics," Wed., Jan. 4, East Councilz
Room, Rackham, B idg., at 1:00 p.m.
Co-Chairmen, L. W. Anderson and J.'
N. Payne.
Events Thursday
Tomorrow at 4:10 p.m. the Depart-1
ment of Speech will resume its Labora-
tory Playbill with a Hopwood-award
winning one-act play, "Resort for Rab-
bits." The performance will be inl
Trueblood Aud., Frieze Bl1dg. No ad-
mission will be charged.
University Lecture-Thurs., Jan. 5.1
8:00 p.m., 1300 Chemistry Bldg. Prof.
H. A. Laitinen of the University of
Illinois will speak on "Electrochem-
istry in Molten Salts."
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics:
Thurs., Jan. 5, at 4:00 p.m. in 3201
Angell Hall. Dr. Akio Kudo of Kyusya
University will speak on. "The multi-
variate analog of one-sided normalI
tests."
Doctoral Examination for Arthur ErIe]
Dammnann, Zoology: thesis: "Some
Factors Affecting the Distribution of
Symnpatric Species of. Rattlenakes
(Genus Crotalusi in Arizona," Thurs.,
JWn. 5, 2009 Museums Bldg., at 2:00
p.m. Chairman, N, E. liartweg.
Doctoral Examination for Brendan
Edwin Alexander Liddell, Philosophy;
thesis: "Motives and Intentions,"
Thurs., Jan. S. 2218 Angell Hall, at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, W. P. Alston.
Doctoral Examination for Ronald Al-
bert Hagler, Library Science; thesis:
"The Selection and Acquisition of
Books in Six Ontario Public Libraries
in Relation to the Canadian Publish-
ing System," Thurs., Jan, 5, .East
Council Room, Rackham Bldg., at 10:00
a.m. Chairman. M. D. Carter.
Doctoral Examination for Ruth Eliza-
beth Searles, Sociology; thesis: "The
Relation between Communication and,
Social Integration in the Community
Hospital," Thurs., Jan. 5, 5609 Haven
Hall, at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, W. S.
Landecker,

August, 1961, are invited to take these
exams.
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
American Students Information Ser-
vice-Paul F. Krynickl will be at the
Summer Placement Fri., Jan. 6, to
talk to interested students concerning
summer work in Europe. SAB D-528.
U.S. Information Agency - Small
Summner Intern Program for Radio
Trainees for the voice of*America
open to Juniors, Seniors, & Grad stu-
dents in Communications, Journalism,
Foreign Affairs, Gov't, or other related
Social Science fields. Applications for
exam must be FILED BY JAN. 26, '61.
Come to Summer Placement for ad-
ditional information.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Minnesota Civil Service -- Openings
for experienced college grads in Busi-
ness Development and Administration
Depts. for positions as Publicity &
Promotion Director and as Architect.
Open to non-residents.
Division of Large Corp., Southeast-
ern Michigan-Opportunity for quali-
fled college grad, with degree in sani-
tation or industrial sanitation as Sani-
; tation Supervisor in Manufacturing
and Processing Depts.
International Atomic Energy Agency,
Vienna, Austria-Two positions avail-
able as English Translator/Precis-
Writer. Good knowledge of French,
Spanish and/or Russian, and if possi-
ble, other languages required. College
degree or. equivalent experience.
Whirlpool Corp., Evansville, Ind. -
Opening for Industrial Training Man-'
ager at Evansville Division. B.A. or
M.B.A. in Personnel and 2-3 yrs, ex-
perience in Industrial Training, Man-
agement Development, or closely re-
lated fields.
Bcrkline Corp., Morristown, Tenn. -
Immediate opening in Design and
(Continued on Page 4)
Orgayization
' Notices

TO DAY'S SPECIAL:
Gril led HamU and~ Chese

j.
0
o 1201 South University
A 9 U~ A * OWN-

s .0-

I

,L__

An n Arbor Civic Theatre

U

NOW'

ilt Wl H

DIAL
NO 5-6290

MAXWELL ANDERSON'S

"Our New Year's gift to you".. .

great she
great cas

EXTRA! Bugs Bunny Color Cartoon

Ioant of corraiae

NEXT
WEEK
LYDIA MENDE

January 12 13, 14
Box of
LSSOHN THEATRE opens N

__

Happy

New

Year

.~ Rifle Club, Meeting, Jan. 4, 7:30 p.m.,
Placement i Nnipogs Range.

The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pub-
lie schools have listed teaching vacan-
es and have Particular need for
teachers in the following fields: kin -
dergarten, primary grades, intermediate
grades, art, English, home economics,
industrial arts, library, mathematics,j
girls' physical education, physical sci-
ence, and special education,
'Teaher examinations for placement
on Pittsburgh public school eligibilityf
lists will he given on Sat., Feb. 11.
Seniors who Wil graduate in June or

* . *
German Club, Coffee Hour, Jan. 4,
3:30-5 p.m., 4072 FB.
* * *
Intern'tl Folk Dancers, Meeting with
Dancing & Instruction, Jan. 4, 8 p.m.,
Lane Hall.
* * *
Sailing Club, Work on Boats, Jan. 5,
7:45 p.m., 537 SAB.
* * *
Wesley Fdn., Holy Communion fol-
lowed by breakfast, Jan. 4, 7 a.m., 1st
Meth. Church, Chapel.

Doctoral degree candidates who qual-
' for the Ph.D. degree or a similar
aduate degree and WHO ATTEND
EE GRADUATION EXERCISES will
epresented a hood by the University.
oods given during the ceremony are
t L 4 16
DIAL N -46

19dmm

61

r

I

IJUAMATIC ARTS CENTER
presents
AN EVENING OF THEATRE
Plays of Strindberg, lonesco, Synge
Original works by Moonyean, with
choreography by Sandra Bader, music
by Alain Giraud and Gordon Mumma

I

11

-TI

Brigitte

BARDOT
in
"COME DANCE
WITH ME"

rom

Fri. and Sat.

8:30 P.M.

First Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw
Admission $1,.25 DAC Members 75c
Tickets on sale at Marshall's Book Shop
and at the door

The Michigan League

I

Based on the novel
"The Blonde Died Dancing"
by Kelley Roos
in EASTMAN COLOR

L

;.

. . . ............ - ----------- --------

M H
I i 1 ' ,
h~i~r-'

DIAL
NO 2-6264

Now!

Start the new year right
Dine at the Michigan League
located in the heart of campus

THE BISHOP'S COMPANY

VF OI
KIM,

A

will present
C. C. LEWIS'

"ONE OF THE 10 BEST PICTURES OF 1960"
-National Board of Review
411 ROF3Rr PFTER
&[-HJ NNM-[MhINO
e I^v
fDeborah Kerr
ti may.won the New York
4 y.Film Critics Award
for her
performance in
'The Sundowners

"The GREAT DIVORCE"

CAFETERIA-LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SNACK BAR-Breakfast, Lunch and Snacks

IN THE SANCTUARY

r

I

i .. m

P

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