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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,;

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a

By PHILIP SUTIN
In the past year there has been
trend towards less breakage of
urniture in the residence halls,
.eonard Schaadt, business man-
ger of residence halls and Uni-'
rersity apartments, indicated.
Schaadt credits this decreased.
3reakage to the greater maturity
If the residents and the coopera-

The Americans Committed to
orld Responsibility work sym-
sium will feature eight seminars,
its areas of concern, four to
held this morning and four this
ternoon.
All events will be held in the
ion.
The morning seminars are on
orld Education, Rm 3-K; World{
malth, Rm. 3D, Selection and'
aining, Rm. 3C; and World
onomic Problems, Rm. 3M. All
gin at 10 a.m.
The afternoon seminars begin
1:30 p.m4 and include discus-
ins of Africa, Rm. 3D; Near East,
n. 3K; Latin America, Rm. 3C;
id South Asia, Rm. 3M.

tion of the house councils in the
various units.
Men's residences account for
much of the breakage that does
occur. "It is in the nature of
boys to be filled with vigor which'
may result in horseplay and break-
ing of . furniture," S c h a ad t
theorized.
However, he noted that residents
of the quadrangles are more con-
siderate of the furniture than in
the past.
Under normal use residence hall
furniture lasts from 15 to 35 years.
Mattresses are replaced after 15
years, but chairs, beds, desks and
other equipment last 35 years
or more.
In selecting furnishings, the
University's purchasing depart-
ment, Service Enterprises, chooses
hotel or institutional type furni-
ture. Men's furnishings are the
most sturdy as feminine appeal is
considered in buying items for the
women's residence halls.
Theft of furniture is heaviest
at the beginning of the school year.
This year two davenports were
stolen from West Quad. Other-
wise thievery has been held to a
minimum with the aid of the
Ann Arbor Police and the dean
of men's office, Schaadt indicated.

By The University News Service
CAMBRIDGE, Mass - A group
of Harvard graduate students have
initiated a campaign to send let-
ters, gifts and Christmas cards to
the four Negro girls who are at-
tending classes in New Orleans
public schools,
"We feel that friendly greetings
from persons all over the nation
would do much to offset the daily
hurt and anguish that these little
girls experience4" a spokesman
for the group said.
. .
LOS ANGELES - The UCLA
faculty academic senate has re-
commended that the University of
California refuse National De-
fense Education Act (NDEA) stu-
dent loans until such time as the
disclaimer affidavit is repealed.
There was no objection to the
oath preceding the affidavit. The
oath affirms "true faith and el-
legiance to the United States of
America" and support of the con-
stitution.
Basis for the faculty opposition
to the affidavit is that it is re-
quired only of students and not of
other groups applying for federal
aid.

By ROSALYN CHAPMAN
"Most faculty members do not
know the difference between one
sorority and another," Prof. Mar-
vin Felheim told a Panhellenic
workshop on sorority-faculty re-
lations Wednesday.
He also° pointed out that most
faculty members do not and should
not give "a healthy damn" if stu-
dents are affiliates or not. The
faculty should naturally prefer an.

A student to a C student regardless1
of living units.-
"If a distinction is to be made,"
Prof. Felheim added, "it is a fact
that most sorority girls are basic-
ally more concerned with extra-
curricular activities than indepen-
dents, and this would tend to make
the academically-minded faculty
less. sympathetic to them."
More Grad Students
Within ten years the University7
will probably be 50 per cent grad-1
uate students and faculty interests1
will tend more towards research
rather than any activity remote-1
ly considered "extra-curricular."
The Important facts in a college
life would then be in getting ad- ;
mitted to the University and grad-'
uating, not in participating in sor-;
ority activities, he said.
Prof. Felheim thought that.
while sororities try to stand for
scholarship they generally do this
for improper reasons. Grades are
done solely for making grades or;
for raising the house average in-;
stead of individual scholarship.j
Sororities are "not geared to the
intellectual life of the University"
but to "social situations," he said.;
Taken Too Seriously
Prof. Felheim warned the sorori-
ties to "remember where you are'
and who you are," so they would
not take themselves as seriously
as they do. "Ten years from now,"
he chided, "you will no longer be
sorority girls." Other things will
have become more important and

the woman who maintains her
sorority ties throughout her mar-
ried life is a "fathead."
He criticized several aspects of
sorority life, concentrating most,
heavily on rush, conformity and
faculty dinners, ".Rush is an in-
terference in the academic life of
the University," he said. "The
magnituderof the system is also
unnecessary because of the num-
ber of girls who rush; with so,
many rushing, any house which
cannot fill its quota should quit
then."
Cites Sameness
"The houses all look alike--the
same pastel colored rugs, the same
pastel furniture . .. the same girls
standing around with the same
hairdos . . . I defy you to take
home your Ensian yearbook and'
have your ten year old brother
pick you out!" he said.
Prof. Felheim suggested that
sorority girls invite their profes-
sors to informal teas or lunches
rather than the customary din-
ners. He said that the dinners fail-
ed in their aim of bringing teacher
and student together and that
toese informal talks would be
more enthusiastically received by
the faculty.
He concluded that the sorority
system on this campus was one
of the best in the nation but would
have to be improved if it was go-
ing to meet the growing intellec-
tual demands of the University.

MUSICAL MDSE.
RADIOS, REPAIRS
GRINNEL RESTYLED UPRIGHT-
The modern look. Only 245, others
from $129.
REGULAR UPRIGHTS-from $69,50.
BEAUTIFUL GRINNEL GRAND -
And we mean beautiful. Only $795.
WHY BUY LESS-A 6' Steinway .
Grand, under 25 years old. Save
$2,100.
Grinnell's
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
The store where Grinnell's began
X8
A-i New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S 'MUSICAL REPAIR
110 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X1
BUSINESS PERSONAL
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat.
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity, NO 8-8887. FF2
TRANSPORTATION'
RIDE DESIRED to N.Y.C. area on Dec.
16 or 17. Call Bob Benson, NO 2-3176.
G25
NEEDED: Ride to New Brunswick, NJ,
or vicinity on Dec. 16 or 17. Joan
Seitz, 4415 Markley. 023

FOR SALE
POTTERY and COPPER-ENAME
from Art Sales at reduced
Call NO 3-9788, 1111 Forest.
FOR SALE: 1957 36x8 Marlette
trailer. 2 bdrm., full bath. Exc
Parked on a 3 acre lot and m
main. Must sell. NO 2-4180E
P.M.
MOVIE CAMERA Canon ZM8
w/case. Trans. radio, 6&7 '1
brand new. Bargain. Call NO 3-
leave message with NO 3-4288.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS FOR TE
WHOLE FAMILY
A line of housewares for the Is
the house.
Tools and some sporting good
the man.
Sleds and skates for the chi
MUEHLIG AND LANPHEKA
311 S. Main NO2
TOYS AND GIFTS FOR AL
Western Auto Associate St
119 E. Washington
Open' Monday through Friday '
HAND-MADE Norwegian Sweate
leading designs in many colo
NO 2-0664.
EXPENSIVE DIAMOND WRISTi
with diamond band. Will sacriS
2-0596,
CHRISTMAS SALE of used and
jewelry. Reasonable. Phone NO
WOMAN'S Raccoon Coat, size, M
Very good cond. $20. NO 3-5355
PERSONAL

PROF. MARVIN FELHEIM
... views affiliates

WANTED: Rider to Dallas on or after YUMMY potato pancakes (lat
Dec. 17. 4334 Markley. NO 5-7711. O2 and song-SUNDAY night
____________________ I ANUKA party, 8 pim., 1429

mmmmm mmmm.3

State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
Universal Bible Sunday, "Bible-Believing
Methodists" Dr. Rupert preaching.
10:15 Seminar: Discussion on major religions
of the world. Christianity, liberal position,
Dev. Gene Ransom leading the discussion.
5:30 Fellowship Supper
7:00 Worship and Program. "Is the Virgin
Birth Necessary to Christ's Divinity?" Rev.
Main and Rev. Cowing speaking.
Wednesdays-
7:90QA.M. Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over
in time for 8:00 classes).
Fridays-
5:30 p.m. Graduate Student Fellowship Sup-
per, followed by program. Pine Room.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
9:45 Student Bible Class, The Old Testament,
taught by Prof. Edgar E. Willis,
I1:00 Worship, "Biography of a Wiseman,"
1 Dwight Anderson preaching.
6;00 Student Fellowship Program. Tree trim-
iming and buffet supper of the Picketts, 502
E. Huron.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Services 9:30 and 1 1:06 A.M.
"AWAKE," Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching
10:20-10:40:. Bible Lecture by Dr. Preston
Slosson.
10:20-10:55: Coffee Fellowship Hour in Main
Hall.
{CHURCH SCHOOL 9,30-10:40 an~d 10:55-
12.00; crib through 12th grade. :
STUDENT GUlLD, 524 Thompson, evening pro-
gram 7:30 each Sunday.
Dr. Luchs broadcasts over WOIA, 1290, at
4:45 P.M.

306 North Division
Sundays-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer,
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS--
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by Lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.

1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Win. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Services: 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m, & 11:50 a.m.
9:00 a.m. service - Rev. David Van
Winkle "A Witnessing Word."
10:30 a.m. & 11:50 am. - Dr. Henry
Kuizenga preaching: "A Necessary Book"
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
FOR STUDENTS
Sundoy, Dec. 11
11:30 a.m. Student Coffee Hour in French
Room following second service.
.6:30 p.m. PSF Christmas Caroling Party.'
Leave from Campus Center at 6:45 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 13
.9:00 p.m. "Coffee & Conversation" -- stimu-
lating discussion Pat Pickett's Apt., 217
S. Observatory.
Wednesday, Dec. 14
12:00 noon Advent Noon-Hour Meditation
Noon until 1 :00 -- A time for private
meditation in the Sanctuary.
GUILD HOUSE
524 Thompson
Associated with the First Congregational
Church, Memorial Christion Church and
Bethlehem Evangelical Reformed Church,
Sunday 9:30 a.m. seminar beginning Sept. 25
at Guild House
Tuesdays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion at
Guild House
Tuesdays 4:30 coffee break
Fridays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion

By DOROTHY DETZER
"The more I discover what is
essential to a really successful
marriage, the more I'm convinced
that the basic essentials of religion
are fundamental to a good mat-
ing " Prof. David Fulcomen said
yesterday.
Prof. Fulcomen, a marriage
counselor and member of the Iowa
State University sociology depart-
ment, outlined five basic require-
ments for a successful marriage in
his lecture on "The Contributions
of Religion to Marriage."
The first requirement is a mu-
tual confidence and respect. People
cannot have stable and satisfying
human relationships until they
4-

)t iieu gton
have a deep respect for other's
dignity as human beings.
Respect Needed.
"If you have a fairly high de-1
gree of mnutual respect and con-
fidence, you won't have to worry
about feeling possessed and con-
fined," Prof. Fulcomer indicated.
Acceptance of and love for the
partner is the second requirement.
"One must love a person just as
he is. One can change a person
really only by accepting him."
Prof. Fulcomer stressed in-
dividuality. "Accept your mate,
thus seeing to it that he main-
tains kris individuality, which is
essential in marriage."
Agreement Necessary
Thirdly, the couple must share
"a high degree of compatibility in
philosophy and values," Prof. Ful-
comer said.
Partners must agree on the most
important things and realize that
they can't agree on everything.
"Religion certainly orients a
couple toward compatibility in
values."
"A feeling of responsibility to
contribute everything possible to
the mnarriag'e," was considered
another prime requirement. One
partner can not exploit the other.
"We must try to concentrate on
trying to be the right kind of a
person for marriage," Prof. Ful--
comer said,
Lastly there must be constant
attempts to undIerstand the part-
ner. "One must try to understand
before reacting to what has been
said or done," Prof. Fulcomer
said. "People need love, especially
when they least deserve it.

AAA° EXPENSE SEATTLE
Absolute best deal Las Vegas, Phoe-
nix, California, St. Louis.
AAA NATIONWIDE DRIVE-AWAY
8900 Gratiot, Detroit WA 5-2070 1
017
BUSINESS SERVICES
HUNGRY?
Find it at Ralph's
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
J25
TYPEWRITER PROBLEMS?
Don't delay in having your- type-
writer cleaned and adjusted. We
will do it for you while you're
home on vacation.
Avoid more complicated problems.
Bring your typewriters to
MORR ILL'S

THE NEW BOLLWEEVIL JASS BA
record (at local record stores) is id
for Christmas.
STUDENTS !
Get your tickets for South Quad's
NOEL MODERNE
Sat., Dec. 10th 9-1 P.M. Semi-For
On sale at main desk in South
Quad and at the door.

314 S. state

WE URGENTLY NEED HEL:
having knowledge of the ac
Diana Paton within the
years please contact us. NO
NO 2-5283.

P. A

NO 3-2481

J102
CHRISTMAS GIFT SUGGESTIONS
From
STUDENT PERIODICAL AGENCY
TIME-1yr .,........,,,... $3.87
LIFE-1 yr.................$4.00
SPORTS ILL.-1 yr. ...........$4.00
FORTUNE-1 yr...............$7.50'
NEWSWEEK-I yr.....,.......$3.00
NEW REPUBLIC-1 yr. .........$5.00
Handsome Gift Card Sent
Order now - pay later
Call NO 2.3061
T100
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Baa Shop. -224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 2-4647. J10
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50

United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor.
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 & 10:45 A.M. Morning Worship
Rev, Ernest R. Klaudt.
7:00 p.m. Hanging of the Greens; Christmas
Presentation Guild House, 524 Thompson
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
College Class 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Evening Discussion 7:00 P.M.
(E. Stanley Jones book, "Christian
Maturity")
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST .
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School
S11:00 A.M. Regular Worship,
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Training Union 6:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:30 p.m,
Prayer Meeting Wed., 7:30 p.m.
Vespers, Lane Hall, Tues., Fri., 5:15-5:45 p.m.
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist
Convention.

11

Arcade Jewe lryShoj
16 NiCmhrLs ARCADE

is

514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858

87

fIlead quarters

for

C-TED STANDA RD SERVICE

Engraved

Gifts

(National Lutheroan Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Postor
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sund y-.
9:00 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
10:00 o.m. Bible Study.
7:00 p.m. Christmas Season Play by
Dorothy Sayers "No Room in the
Inn"
8:30 p.m. Communion,
Wednesday-
7:15 p.m. Caroling followed by Christ-
mas Party.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 3-0589
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 Church School
8:45 and 11:00 Morning Worship Services
"Blessed Are The Peacemakers"
5:45 Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups
7:00 Evening Service "Christmas Musical"
7:30 Wednesday-Prayer Meeting.
Speaker - Wayne Sounders with
T.E.A.M.

Engravin g FREE
24-hour service
arcade jewelry shop
16 nickels arcade

Friendly Service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
l "o Ph Complete Automotive Service-All
*!sofL'am'"'r.' products and services guaranteed.
,n, Gill chic. Ca''alcor'. Road Service
t r~y~n rt a ahrweigh~t 44
z...wr "*"You expect mQr fram Standard
ie,"oungingcom" and you get it."
$port5 '(moport dute, a 1220 South University
taxas Included NO 8-9168
Satisfactton Guarantasd 52
NATURAL COLORS (100% waalhabt.)
Ow at.OB.ig.arown Sz.:x*,- SITUATION WANTED
JSand cheek or money order t
PAN-AM IMPORTS TUTORING and translating. German,
B.o. sOXi- Russian, French. Call NO 3-9575. HH7
~INIVtft GROVE, ILL-
!IOUSEWORK WANTED - Experienced,
dependable person. NO 2-9782. HH2
Dail Classifieds BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords--$7.95; socki
.brin Resuls 39c; shorts 69e: military supplies.
SAM'S STORE, 1221. Washington,
Wi,

CACIQUE, Feli Anniversario, MI Vid
Qfuera 9
Join the DAILY and see the world -
through an Associated Press Teletyp
Machine. -Fl
THE CAFE PROMETHEAN now has
new weekday menu - tower prcc
with plenty of atmosphere, go
music. Why not visit us nn your ne
coffee date? -P
TO ALL JANUARY GRADUATES: 4 n
one interested in being studen1
speaker for January graduatIon,, co
tact Bob Radway at NO 5-5547 e
Jim Agnew at NO 5-9422. F11
HELP WANTED
FULL TIME TYPING and general offic
position available at. Follett's, 32
South State Street. Full time appi
cations only.
STUDENTS AND YOUNG WOMEN, 1
years and over to work part tm;
9 a n.-i p.s., 1 p m.-5 p m. or 5 pnI
9 p.m. Mn.-Fri. Telephone inufie
from our office. Salary. For interiel
call NO 2-5698. B
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: A Parker "61" pen in front e
-Jordan Hall on De. 7. Call NOS
1561, Ext. 129.
LOST: String of pearls. Sentiment
value. Call NO 3-6001. A
LOST? To Sn47 yourself try the Wd0
gan Daily. Just "fnd a telephone a
dial NO 2-3241.
FOUND: 30 weeks Ia full shoo \ea
of interesting, newsy reading. Th'
was found on the Diag June , 190
and the owner is wanted deperat:
Please call NO 2-3241 for informatio:
and fnd a year's DfAILY subcrfptiO
as a reward (only $8.50 toO).
USED CARS
sWAP-Jaguar Mark VI, 4 door seda
in good condition for a VW. Prte
ably a MIcrobus or Kombi. Contal
Businessmen's Athletic Club., 22
W. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor. NI
1955 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan. NevI
exposed to Michigan salt. 6 cy
standard shift. tires almost ne
$325. NO .5-5401. X
'41 CADILLAC. 4 door, dark green. E
cond. $650. Make offer. NO 2-59
weekends or after 8 PM. Ni
'58 CHEVROLET
By original owner. Fine ondIton.!
,'our - door sedan. ix '- cylinder .
Standard shit. Power teering.
Radio and heater. $1100. Cafl NO-
,3-9103N9
'55 CHEV., 6 cy. standard trans. Excel
cond. $400. Call NO 5-5133. '
1960 -ILLMAN Convertible, call Jac
after 7. PA 1-1178X
'54 MERC 2-door automatic. Good ct
dition. Winterized. $300. NO 3-1
evenings. Nit
M s: '48and '58. Call NO 8-715
Reasonable. li
FOR RENT
QUIET ROOMS NEAR CAMPU
Linens furnished. $6-$7. We will
help you move. 1319 Hill. NO 24422.
C99
MUINISHED: One bedroom apt. aval
able for next semester only. QCu
after 6, NO 5-5816. Col
FURNISHED HOME for 2nd semestz
429 E. Shore Dr., Whitmore Lake.
bdrms., gas furnished, fireplace ati
bath, $110 month ,including ht
and phone. Cal HI 9-4411 or P10
0873.°C!
1033 E. University - newly turgisli
apartment for single girl. All util
ties included.. $75. Call NO 2-5489.
ATTRACTIVE, clean apartment on 4r'
er l1 miles from campus. Applica
tions taken from young married coi
ples. Phone NO 3-5126. 0
TWO BEDROOM partly a ur'is
house. Newly decorated at Whitno

10:00 and 11:30 Meetings for Worship
10:00 Adult Forum
7:00 Young Friends, at the Center.

Morning Service: 10:00 c.m.
Evening Service: 7:30 p.m.
Guest minister at the University Reformed
Church will be the Rev. Calvin Malefyt,
minister to the students at the Park Street
Church in Boston. He will conduct both
services.

Church School 10:00 Church Service 11:00
Sermon: "Our Hard-To-Serve Children" Mrs.
Josephine Brokaw.
Student Group 7:00 p.m.-Dr. Z. Clark Dick-
inson: "Movement of the '30's and Early
'40's" Transportation available at 6:45
from Quads, Alice Lloyd, Markley, and
Stockwell Halls.

1131 Church St.'
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister.
Morning Services, 8:45 and 11:00 A.M.
University Bible Class, 10:00 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.

1833 Washtenow Ave.
1.1:00 a.m. Sunday services
8:00 p.m. Wednesday services
9:30 a.m. Sunday school (adults up to 20
years old)
11:00 a.m. Sunday schol (children 2 to 6
verold)~~A

*

2250 Fuller Road
(opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister

I

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