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December 10, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,ATE POWERS:
'ierce Examines Legislatures' Decline

SGC Opens
Committee

fARG CHALLENGES VIEW:
Man Not Licensed To Sul
By JUDITH BLEIER
"It is an enormous assumption.
that man is licensed to subdue

bdue Earth

- RON WILTON
o the complexities of
litical operations, legis-
ve been forced to dele-
of their functions to
tutions," said Prof. Roy
the political science de-
at a rotndtable dis-
hursday night.
g in the Rackham As-
[all on the question
egislatures Declined?"1

<9

'Prof. Pierce explained that
when speaking about the decline
of legislatures he did not mean
that they accomplish less, or act-
ed on less-iiportant issues.
"What I do mean," he said, "is
that with regard to the policy
making process of government,
legislatures have declined in re-
lation to the executive."
Notes British System
With respect to England, Prof.
Pierce cited the fact that it is,
the cabinet that makes the ma-
jor policy decisions, with the par-
liament holding a veto power.
Since the cabinet members be-
long to the majority party in Par-
liament bills usually go through
without too much trouble.
.Prof. Pierce used the "Monet
Plan," an investment scheme for
rebuilding of the French economy
after World War II, as an exam-
ple of the French Parliament's
policy-making power under the
Fourth Republic.
"The 'Monet Plan' was formu-
lated by the executive branch and
put into practice by decree early
in 1947. It was not ruled on by
the parliament."
"Provisions of the second in-
stallment of the plan were passed
by the legislature in 1956, two
years after they had gone into
effect," Prof. Pierce said.
In answer to a question on the
role of the modern legislature,
Pierce explained that "the ideal
parliament would establish a hier-
archy among the matters under
its jurisdiction, and, after start-
ing at the top, it would delegate

the lesser matters to screening
boards or local authorities."
Explains Success
In explaining the success that
the executives of the three coun-
tries have had in seeing their
programs accepted, both by the
legislature and by the public, Prof,
Pierce noted the growth of ad-
visory committees as a major fac-
tor. The committees act as trans-
mitters of public opinion to the
government and serve to relieve
legislatures of some of their bur-
dens.
Not Dangerous
"These advisory committees are
not dangerous to democracy," he

said, "providing parliaments re-
tain a veto power over them. Un-
der this condition the evolution
of these committees looks prom-
ising,"
The legislatures were originally
formed' to serve as organs of dis-
cussion, and to provide a unify-
ing force on the particular na-
tion, the political scientist observ-
ed.
With the nations unified, and
political operations as complex
as they are today, Prof. Pierce
declared that "legislatures have
decentralized in favor of other
institutions while still holding on
to an ultimate veto power."

Pledge Presidents Vote
For Constitution Change

1OF. ROY PIERCE
s parliamentary decline
rce based his comments
British Parliament, the
arliamentary system un-
Fourth Republic, and the
tates Congress.

ice' Elects Officers,
ris Extended Activities

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
A meeting of sorority pledge
presidents unanimously approved
four changes in the Junior Pan-
hellenic Association constitution
Wednesday.
Three of the four changes oc-
curred in article three on mem-
bership. Section one of the ar-
ticle states that the Junior Pan-
hellenic Association shall be ini-
tially composed of the pledge
classes of Panhellenic Association.
The new amendment deletes the
word "initially" from the section.
Section Two of the article pres-
ently reads "Membership shall
continue until the end of the
academic year during which they
were pledged." The change to this
section adds the phrase "except
in the case of officers and pledge
presidents."
Section Three now reads "In
the case of officers, membership
shall extend until their term ex-
pires." The change in the con-
stitution would enable the offi-
cers and the pledge presidents to
maintain their offices until the
new officers and pledge presidents
are inducted.
A change was proposed under a
section of the article on represen-
tation, As the constitution stands,
it reads "A representation from
each sorority pledge class shall
consist of the president of each
pledge class and at least two oth-
er members of each pledge class."
The approved change reads: "A

representation from each sorority
pledge class consisting of: 1) the
president of each pledge class for
weekly meetings. 2) All other
members of each pledge class for
special meetings called by the
Executive Board."
The changes in the constitution
cannot go into effect until they
are approved by senior Panhellen-
ic Association.
Under the present constitution,
Junior Panhel rarely meets ex-
cept in executive session after the
end of the academic year in which
the group is pledged,,
The Junior Panhel Executive
Board favored the changes in the
group's constitution for many
reasons. The changes in article
three will provide the executive
board with a smaller working
group. Since most of the meetings"
will be attended only by pledge
presidents, the size of the group
will facilitate more effective dis-
cussion and a broader agenda.
The pledge presidents will pro-
vide a representative group to
which plans may be presented by
the executive board and discussed
before being presented to all the
new pledges for action'
The amendment will also pro-
vide senior Panhel added commu-
nication with the individual
houses. With the proposed changes
effected, any problems of the new
initiate as well as the pledges
could be discussed more thorough-
ly.

Petitioning
By RITA SHIELDS
Petitioning opens today and will
continue through Jan. 4 for 19
positions on SGC's special com-
mittees, Administrative V i c e-
President Richard Nohl, '62BAd.,
has announced.
The early registration pass com-
mittee has three vacancies, each
post lasting for one year. The four
openings on the human relations
board are also one year terms.
Eight posts are available on
Cinema Guild Board. Three will
last for a semester and the re-
maining five are full year terms.
A one semester job of manager
and two assistantships of the
Student Book Exchange are also
open. The manage;' is paid $100
a semester, and the assistants re-
ceive $50 each.
The post of elections director,
which lasts for one semester, is
also open.
This committee consists of Nohl,
chairman; Betsy Carroll, '62; IFC
Secretary John Richards, '61BAd.;
and Michael Turoff, '61BAd., Ad-
ministrative vice-president of the
Michigan Union.
Service Club
To Run Buses
Alpha Phi Omega has completed
plans for running the Willowpoli-
tan bus service for the Christmas
recess.
The service fraternity plans to
correlate their bus schedule more
closely with the departure times
of the planes cutting down the
time students have to wait at the
airport. A schedule of the 96 planes
leaving Friday and a bus schedule
will be distributedd Monday in the
fishbowl.
Tickets will be sold in the fish-
bowl and at Travel Bureau Inc.
Monday through Thursday. Prices
will remain the same, $1.25 to
Willow Run and $1.50 to Metro-
politan.
The 'buses will leave from thel
Michigan Union, Mosher-Jordan
and the corner of Hill St. and
Washtenaw Ave.

... questions man's realm
ISA To Hold
Party Today
The International Children's!
Christmas party will be held to-
day from 2:30 to 5 p.m. in the
snack bar of the Michigan League.
The purpose of the party is to
bring together children of foreign
families living on campus for an
American style Christmas cele-
bration.
Prof. James Davis, director of
the International Center, will play
Santa Claus and distribute Christ-
mas favors to all the children.
"This party will enable the
children to meet with each other
and to play in a warm and friendly
atmosphere where language will
be no barrier for fun," Annette
LeMessurier, '62Ed., chairman of
the party, said .
Fondern To Run
For Council Post
Ellis Fondern has announced his
candidacy for the fifth ward city
council seat. He is the first Dem-
ocrat to announce candidacy for
a council post,
Republican Councilman George
A. Keebler of the fourth ward will
not seek re-election, he announc-
ed yesterday.

the earth," Prof. Ian L. McHarg,
chairman of the graduate depart-
ment of landscape architecture
at the University of Pennsylvania,
told students and faculty yester-
day at a lecture sponsored here
by the art department.
Prof.lMcHarg, a landscape archi-
tect, teacher, researcher and tele-
vision personality, came to this
country from Scotland 14 years
ago. There are certain liabilities
to being a Presbyterian and a
Scotsman he reflected.
"As a result of my cultural heri-
tage I was taught that the universe
is oriented toward man. But as a
landscape architect I have an
entirely different set of views."
"There is a cosmos, a whole,"
Prof. McHarg explained, "and in
it man has seldom, if ever been'
a creator. Morality exists not only
in man's action to man but in
man's action to the total realm.
Challenges Vie vpoint
Prof. McHarg challenged the
classical viewpoint of Judaism,
Christianipy and humanism which
teaches that man alone was creat-
ed in God's image and that. he
was made to dominate the earth.
These theories "have inhibited him
from creativity. He has become a
menace to all human life, and in-
deed to all life.
"Twentieth century man is con-
fronted with an awful problem.
He must discover the meaning
of nature and the place of his

role in the environment," Prof.
McHarg said.
"Western man ip a 'Johnny-
come-lately,' a gifted parasite. He
has 'made his object the conquest
of nature. He insists that he alone
is made in the exclusive image
of God.
Man's Interdependence
"But no organism ever has, does
or will live without an environ-
ment; each member must adjust
himself to the other members of
the community. Man must under-
stand his interdependence," Prof.
McHarg said.
"When he destroys he also de-
stroys himself. In the Atomic Age
he holds the key to the extinction
of all life," he said.
Prof. McHarg asserted that
man's most impressive achieve-
ment lies in the advancement of
social justice. Consequently he
deems it an "extraordinary para-
dox" that the wealthiest men in
history have created the "most
squalid, most life inhibiting" en-
vironment ever.
Challenge Elects
Glick Spokesman
Brian Glick, '62, was elected
spokesman of Challenge at the
group's meeting yesterday.
Barbara Kahn, '61, was elected'
treasurer and Susan Harris, '61,
was appointed secretary. Caroline
Dow, '63, was named financial ad-
visor and director of relations.
financial advisor and director of
relations.

I

Continuous
Today
from 1 P.M.

DIAL
NO 8-6416

1b

'"f 1'

C-

e, the student political
elected officers and draftedi
for an expansion of its
of interest at a membership
g Thursday night.e
mas Hayden, '61, proposedt
Toice should take an active
't in future applicants for
erary collegedsteering com-c
and Joint Judiciary. This
tion was strongly approved
members.
ther business, it was decided
the research committeep
examine the possibilitiest
ooperative, University man-

issue was postponed until further
discussion.
The meeting concluded with the
election of new officers,
Those elected were David Gil-
trow, '61Ed., chairman; Carol Co-
hen, '64, secretary-treasurer; Ken-
neth McEldowney, '61, operations
committee chairman; Cynthia
Hartwig, '61, research committee
chairman; Richard James, '63,
elections committee chairman;
Carol-Lynne Carr, '65A&D, and
Nancy Press, '64, co-Chairmen of
the education committee.

w r+" Gounod S
XA WS T f1
+ Italo TAJO
Roily CORRAMJ ino eMARERA ,
Donizette's DON PASQUALE
--- --SUNDAY
FERNAN DEL.in
"THE BIG CHI EF"

I

I

I

nentioned was a possible
with the newly-formed
Conservative Club over
vie "Operation Abolition"
els with the recent San
o "riots" against the
Un-American Activities
ttee. Direct action on the

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

,.

NEWMAN CLUB
CAMELIAN BREAKFAST
SUNDAY
After 9:30 Mass
SPEAKER: MR . ALAN GUSKIN
"THE PEACE CORPS"

''

- U

A
DEAL NOh2-6264°

* ENDS TONIGHT*

DIAL NO 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT *

SENSATIONAL,
ID I MEAN
NSATONAI 9
-New Yor Daily News

The Daily Offical Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
General Notices
President and Mrs. Hatcher will hold
open house for students at their home
Wed., Dec. 14 from 4 to 6 p.m.
MIDYEAR GRADUATION EXERCISES:
January 21, 1961
To be held at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Aud.
Exercises will conclude about 4:00 p.m.
Organization
Notices
December 10, 1960
Congr., Disciples E & RL Stud. Guild,
Seminar: Biblical Thought, Rev. J.E.
Edwards, 9:30 a.m.; Hanging of the
Greens, 7 p.m.; Dec. 11, 524 Thompson.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Dec.
12, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.
Senior Board, Order caps and gowns
for Feb. graduation from Moe's Sport
Shop, 711 N. University Ave., Monday
thru Saturday, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Wesley Fdn., Seminar: Christianity,
liberal position, Rev. G. Ransom, 10:15
a.m., Pine Rm.; Fellowship Supper,
5:30 p.m., Pine Rm.; Worship & Pro-
gram: "It the Virgin Birth Necessary
to Christ's Divinity?" 7 p.m., Wesley
Lounge; Dec. 11, 1st. Meth. Church.

Reception for graduates, their rela-
tives and friends in Michigan League
Ballroom at 4:00 p.m. Please enter
League at west entrance.
Tickets: Three to each prospective
graduate, to be distributed from Mon-
day, Jan. 9, to 1:00 p.m. Sat., Jan. 21,
at Cashier's Office, first floor lobby
of Admin. Bldg.
Academic Costume: Can be rented
at Moe Sport Shop, 711 North Univer-
sity Ave. Orders should be placed im-
mediately,
Assembly for Graduates: At 1:00p.m.
in Natural Science Aud. Marshals will
direct graduates to proper stations.
Graduation Announcements, Invita-
tions, etc.: Inquire at Office of Stu-
dent Affairs.

A LEY KRAMER

Placement Notices
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
INTERVIEWS
Camp Conestoga, Leonidas, Mich. -
Mr. Steve Baumann interviewing Mon.,
Dec. 12, from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m., SAB.
Stanley Home Products Co. - Post-,
tions for work part-time while going
to school; Mr. Michael E. O'Donnell,
interviewing, Tues., Dec. 13, from 1:30
to 5:00 p.m.. SAB.
The Summer Placement Service is
open Monday through Thursday from
1:30 to 5:00 p.m., and all day Friday,
Room _D-528, SAB.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
(Continued on Page 4)

ICIMRKELLY

* SUNDAY
CARRY ON
SERGEANT"

Programs: To be distributed at Hill
Aud.
Doctoral degree candidates who qual- a
ify for the Ph.D. degree or a similar
graduate degree and WHO ATTEND e
THE GRADUATION EXERCISES will be
presented a hood by the Universmity.
Hoods given during the ceremony are For 5810
all Doctor of Philosophy hoods. Those
receiving a doctor's degree other than All sizes from table top
the Ph.D. may exchange the Ph.D.-
hood for the appropriate one imme- to Church trees
after the ceremony. Such ex- 537Detroit St., corner N. Divison
change may be made in 1139 Natural 53 eri tconrNDvso
Science after the recessional march. yligygyiggp
Thirty-Second
Christmas
$ Community Sing
s TODAY
HILL AUDITORIUM
7:30 (Doors Open 7)
SEE and HEAR
The Christmas Story
PAGEANT...MUSIC...AND THE SPOKEN WORD
with
Choral and Audience in Community Singing
of traditional Carols.
Co-Directors

Give them MORE for Christmas 1
-I
-I
I
SAll Nationally-Advertised Labels
$398 LP's. . .Only... $39
I $98 LP's..Only. $ 0
I 598L's ...On~y
6 LP's...Ony.."
SETS REDUCED ACCORDINGLY
SAle incades monaural and stereo
Special groups reduced even more drastically.
Come see us for your new STEREO portable
Special groups reduced even more drastically.
Coeseu oryu e TEE otbe

STARTS SUNDAY

TONIGHT AND
TOMORROW NIGHT ONLY,
JNIVERSITY PLAYERS-Dept. of Speech
Sean O'Casey's wayward comedy,
P URPLE

DUST

F. ,

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