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December 09, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DAILY

's Sorority -rogress

Bigelow roposes Plan
To Contact Outer Space

UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES:
Petitions Seek To Abolish Commi

By MARCIA NATHAN
he key to the successful pro-
of the sorority system
gh the next 20 years is con-
d in the phrase found in the
g of the Supreme Court, 'to
with all deliberate speed,"'
Deborah Bacon told a Pan-
nic Association workshop dis-
on on Panhel and the Ad-
stration Wednesday.
an 'Bacon said sororities feel
selves now "in a state of
ttled siege" regarding their
,itutions. fI'his situation is
as terrible as it seems, how-
ny period that is great, may
be comfortable," she warned,
atness makes for growth and
=ment but does not induce
,d comfort."
Membership Clause
an Bacon stated that to her
vledge only one sorority of the
cognized campus chapters has
utright phrase of discrimina-
in the membership clause of
onstitution. According to the
ent Government Council rul-
the clause must be eliminated
his campus. But Dean Bacon
ved that it is impossible to
e a law concerning attitudes
a girls are making their inner
ions on whom to pledge.
onstitutions are really bor-
' Miss Bacon said. They are
news; they are not secrets.
titutions are merely a set of
for the structure of an or-
zation. Bowling clubs, church
ciations, and campus political
Les have constitutions too.
mly the rituals are true soror-
ecrets, and Miss Bacon believesI
s Just sloppy thinking to in-
e them in a constitution
er." When sororities are asked
they keep their constitutions

a secret, they frequently reply,
"it's traditional."
Secrets Annoy Public
In the 20th century, Miss Bacon
noted,. secret 'constitutions annoy
the public. If the sorority system
is to continue its growth, it must
compromise between the 100 per
cent of what it wants and the 100.
per cent the public wants." In a
constitutional democracy no one
gets everything he wants.
"Some sororities complain that
their alumnae still have veto
power over their membership
selection. They can't tell sororities
whom they may have, but they
can tell them whom they may not
have. "The 'recommendation let-
ter' serves this purpose," she said.
"The alumnae as 'mothers'
worry about the associates of their
'daughters' in their sororities,"
Miss Bacon commented, "just as
they worry about whom their little
girl plays with." They feel they
have a right to some say in run-
ning the houses because of the
great amount of money they have
invested in them.

4

Young Republican
Receives A ward-
Steven Stockmeyer, '63, newly
elected president of the Young
Republicans, received the "Young
Republican" Award for his work
during the campaign from the Ann
Arbor Republican Committee, at
their annual banquet Wednesday
night.
Josephine McKenna, '61, out-
going president of the club, was
also awarded a citation of honor
for her efforts. Miss McKenna
received the Young Republican
award last year.

It is difficult for alumnae to
adjust to the mid 20th century,
she said. They are frightened of
the rapid change andmust be con-
vinced that there is a need to
face the future. Since the future
will come anyway, the best thing
to do is to work with it as it
come~.
As the universities get larger,
the need for sororities grows, Dean
Bacon believes. These "small liv-
ing units" are a necessary balance
to the large, relatively non-
cohesive groups found in the new
residence halls, such as Mary
Markely.
"A sorority is a small, cohesive,
self-conscious, highly organized-
sometimes too highly organized-
group which knows what it wants."
Fantastic Existance
The fact that sororities and
fraternities exist is fantastic in
itself. Except in 19th and 20th
century America, no one has ever
seen anything like them before,
she said. "The only group that
faintly resembles an affiliated
house were the German dueling
clubs popular in Heidelberg in the
19th and 20th centuries. This is
the only way to even begin to
explain this kind of social group-
ing to a European educator."
Sororities are "madly exception-
al" because, in addition, they are
women living in this form of as-
sociation.
"Leadership frequently comes
from a sorority," Miss Bacon said.
"A sorority girl is very often a
girl who is interested in people
like herself, who actively supports
structured government around
her, who likes small groups, who
is interested in counseling and
helping within the status quo, and
who is willing to give time to
help.
Gives Characteristics
"A sorority girl is usually well-
educated, conservative, g o o d-
looking, and has a certain amout
of brains and breeding. She as-
sumes that voluntary service with-
in her community is a natural
thing for her to contribute."
Miss Bacon considers this es-
sentially a description of volun-
teer workers in society in an upper
class community.

By PHILIP SUTIN
Prof. Julian H4. Bigelow of the
Institute of Advanced Studies at
Princeton University suggested a
mathematical system of com-
munication using changes in a
modulated radio beam as a means
of communication with outer
space.
Prof. Bigelow discussed code
systems for interplanetary trans-
mission and the means for sending
them at the second of two lec-
tures on "Problems of Communica-
tions from and to Outer Space,"
sponsored by the Institute of
Science and Technology and the
electrical engineering department.
So that any receiving planet

would comprehend the series ofZ
mesages being transmitted, Prof.
Bigelow proposed four separate
frequencies be used. The first unit
would broadcast in code basic
number ideas for short intervals
of time to allow the receiver toI
understand the material. A second
channel would broadcast longert
sequences of messages with more
complex materials. Third andc
fourth units would present longer
and more difficult messages.
Instructs Listener
Each channel at the end of itsy
presentation instructs the listener
to switch to a more advanced
frequency.
By broadcasting on these four
different frequencies other planets
may pick up the message at any,
point and be able to understand
it, Prof. Bigelow said.
An unmistakeably man-made
signal for use in sending coded
mesages to other planets could
be made by reversing the phase,
or sign of energy, and coils of the
transmitting apparatus.
A series of evenly spaced beeps
would express elemental numerical
ideas, he continued. Another stan-
dard time signal would represent
algebraic relationships such as
equal, multiplication, addition, and
substraction.
Three Plus Five
Once the symbols are establish-
ed, the transmitter would broad-,
cast series of mathematical rela-
tionships, such as three plus five
equals eight, he explained. Later
more advanced relationships would
be transmitted, leading eventually
to a description of today's science.
Prof. Bigelow, however, warns
that greater depth of this material
produces generalizations from par-
ticular examples which are dif-
ficult to instruct in "the monolog
teaching of a language."
Scientists must assume that life
on other planets have similar
generalizations, and are able to
remember them accurately, he
said.

Petitions calling for the aboli-
tion of the House Committee on
Un-American Activities have been
signed by about a hundred Uni-
versity students so far in, what
organizers of the drive termed a
"token protest."
The petitions were sent here by
an organization called the Califor-
n i a Intercampus Coordinating
Committee, as part of a nation-
wide campaign which includes
other college 'campuses.
McHarg To Speak
On Environment
I Prof. Ian L. McHarg, chairman
of the Landscape Architecture De-
partment of the Graduate School
of Fine Arts at the University of
Pennsylvania, will speak on "Man
and Environment" at 4 p.m. to-
day in the Architecture Aud.
He will discuss the effects of
the environment on man and re-
late these to the problems of ar-
chitecture and design. The lec-
ture is sponsored by the art de-
partment.
Marriage Advisor
T o Give Lfect ure

The CICC is made up of ten
West Coast university representa-
tives. They plan to present the
petitions directly in Washington
at the beginning of the Congres-
sional session.
Aryay Lenske, speaking on be-
half of the CICC said, "The stu-,
dent demonstrations against the
Committee last May and the sub-
sequent misinterpretation a n d
false information being circulated
concerning students' role in that
protest even further increase our
desire to see this Committee abol-
ished.

III

E'- .

Little Club

Tonight, 9-12

We intend to couple this petition
activity with personal talks with
each of our Congressmen." The
students will call on the represen-
tatives of their 'respective areas
during the Christmas vacation,"
he said.
The members of the CICC in-
clude University of California at
Los Angeles, University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley, Los. Angeles
City College, Reed College in Port-
land, San Francisco State College,
Los Angeles State College, San
Jose State College, Oakland City
College, U. of Washington and
Sacramento State College.

DANCING
Night Club Atmospher

i

BOWLING

PROF. JULIAN H. BIGELOW
.. space communications
SGC FINANCE:
Apointees
Approved
By IRIS BROWN

Prof. David Fulcomer will speak
on "The Contributions of Religion
to Marriage Preparation" at 4:15
p.m. today, in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Prof. Fulcomer is a professor of
sociology and marriage counselor
at Iowa State University. The lec-
ture is open to the public.
Christmas Trees
ForSae
All sizes from table top
to Church trees
537 Detroit St., corner N. Division .

ANN ARBOR RECREATION
STUDENT RATES
MODERN -AUTOMATIC

FREE

""

ne-=Tm m

i E. Huron

NO 2-0103

"Superb Singers"
--New York Times

.

DIAL
NO 8-6416

SUNNY TERRY
and
BROWNIE McGHEE
Opening tonight thru Dec. 31
until 4 A.M.
Sun., Tues., Wed., Thurs.,
until 2 A.M.
First Show begins 9 P.M.

LEONCAVALLO 's
/- -
rt./g

c

ru

CAFE GALERIE
19940 Livernois, Det., UN 2-4455
North of Outer Drive

I

* CO i Gn VXOIGIDA

The Original Ballet Russe in
Weber's INVIATION TO THlE DANCE " pbl$* Strauss' GRADUATION BALL

LAST OPERA SATURDAY
"FAUST"

COMING
FERNANDEL
in "BIG CHIEF"

I

DIAL TODAY
-6264 and
SATURDAY
THE T i i M(;GVENTM
THAT BROUG;HT AN UMPIR
TGITS IIE5!

DIAL NO 5-6290
Please Note Time Schedule
j is
"SENSATIONAL,
--Nvw York Dairy News
"Oe of themost
BRILLIANT
displasof acin
eve witnssed!.
STANLEY KRAMER amts
TRACY MARCH MELy
SHOWS AT
1:00 - 3:30
6:15 - 8:50
Feature 25 Minutes.Later

Student Government Council
approved the appointment of five
Council members to the SGC Fi-
nance Committee at Wednesday
night's meeting.
They are Arthur Rosenbaum,
'62, Per Hanson, '62, Richard Nohl,
'62, Myra Goines, '61, and Lynn
Bartlett, '63.
Also approved was the appoint-
ment of Mary Wheeler, '61, to the
J o i n t Judiciary Interviewing
Board. Dennis Shafer, '63, was ap-
pointed Chairman of the Student
Activities Committee, and Bar-
bara May, '61, was named SGC
office manager.
I M. A. HyderShah, grad, will be
sent to a Conference of the Experi-I
ment in International Living as
the SGC representative.
Comprehensive Alternatives
The Education and Student
Welfare Committee proposed to
write a letter to the Literary Col-
lege Faculty Curriculum Commit-
tee urging it to investigate a
means for seniors to integrate
work in their major fields.
The Council asked that this let-
ter suggest research on tutorial
sessions, senior papers, independ-
ent study programs, and other al-
ternatives, to comprehensives. The
letter will be presented at next
week's Council meeting.
Brian Glick, '62, present chair-
man of the International Coordi-
nating Board, proposed that the
Board be replaced by three sep-
arate committees.
Increase Contacts
He stressed that the most cru-
cial area of concern is to in-
crease person to person"and small
group contact between Americans
and international students.
Another would coordinate the
activities of International Week,
nationality'clubs, and other rele-
vant student organizations.
The third would be the present
SGC International Committee. It
would concentrate on informing
both foreign and American stu-
dents who wish to travel or study
abroad.
The Council approved a request
of the Committee for Improved
Cuban-American Relations which
will allow the group to aid in plan-
ning travel arrangements for stu-
dents spending the vacation in
Cuba.
The tour is being arranged by a
group in New York, but SGC ap-
proval is necessary so that the
Committee can publicize the trip
and introduce interested individ-
uals to one another.

DUST

TONIGHT
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS--Dept. of Speech

Sean O'Casey's wayward comedy
PURPLIE

Season subscribers-
Exchange coupons now
for tickets to
SEASON OF THE BEAST
JAN. 10-14

Box office open
10- 8 Daily
Thursday-$1.50, $1.00
Fri. & Sat. --$1.75, $1.25
Sunday -$1.50, 1.00

ll

Thirty-Second
+,-C ristmas
CommunitySing
SATURDAYQ
DECEMBER
. *HILL AUDITORIUM
7:30 (Doors Open 7)
SEE and HEAR
The Christmas Story
in
PAGEANT., . MUSIC ... AND THE SPOKEN WORD
with .
Choral and Audience in Community Singing
of traditional Carols.
$r
Co-Directors
Rosella Duerksen Barbara Sandberg
I" Bring a friend, invite a neighbor, ask a newcomer
or foreign student.
EVERYONE WELCOME.. . NO ADMISSION CHARGE
In keeping with the spirit of Christmas giving,
CONTAINERS WILL BE PLACED IN THE LOBBY
FOR CANNED FOODS FOR LATER DISTRIBUTION TO
THE NEEDY BY THE CHRISTMAS BUREAU.

8:00 P.M.

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

fr

WORLD EDUCATION
ISSUES-Union, Rm. 3K
Discussants:
Dr. Medlin
Mr. & Mrs. P. Clark
Mr. Tony Shibaya
Mr. Howard Pollio
Discussion Leader

WORLD HEALTH ISSUES
Union, Rm. 3D
Discussants:
Dean Wegman
Dr. Boyce
Dr. Gibson
Dr. Beeuwkes
Dr. Reynolds
Miss Dona Budani
Discussion Leader

SELECTION AND,
TRAINING OF PEACE
CORPS-Union, Rm. 3C
Discussants
Dr. Eggertsen
Dr. Van Der Schalie
Mr. Silverman
Discussion Leader

WORLD ECONOMIC
PROBLEMS-Union,
Rm..3M
Discussants:
Dr. Mildstein
Dr. Fusfeld
Dr. Shearear
Mr. Connor
"Discussion Leader

' 1;!

I

I

(9

' . 1i

1I

AMERICANS COMMITTED TO WORLD RESPONSIBILITY"

-present-

14ac

11!

e 2

"A SYMPOSIUM ON THE PEACE CORPS AND WORLD RESPONSIBILITY"

IPlft-

I

FMIDAY-7:30-RACKHAM

NIGHT"

SUNDAY - A

N1r rsrA

iw

IS in "GIRL OFT

Speakers:,

.. ...

I I

-w

S.G.C. Ciema &jiI
*
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
LUIS BUNUEL'S Mary Chase's
LOS OLVIDADOS Pulitzer Prize Winning Comedy
(THE YOUNG AND DAMNED) UADVEV

Al Guskin
Dr. S. P. Hayes'
Mr. Bert Garskof,,
Conference Chairman
Saturday-Seminars

Mr. G. Bursley
Mr. Joseph Pia
Miss Susan Epstein

10-11:30

1:30-3:00

/.

Michigan Union

I1

Pa*
PRE-REdISTRATION 9-4 Thursday and Friday at the FISHBOWL

.. ~ I .

' I AFRICA-Rm. 3D

NEAR EAST-Union

LATIN AMERICA-

SOUTH ASIA, Union
B... Rt

11

11

1

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