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December 08, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY '1

TURE' THEME:
.rwin Reads, Discusses Own Poetry

rDAVID 1MARCUS
V. S. Merwin yesterday
ading of his own poems
on a theme which he
departure."
take this theme too
'Merwin said. "It's a'
from ideas, from things
were."
i described this concept as
overy by abandon, de-
rom the old and trying
Lew."
s the ideal stoic; a man
ses who says I have no
about myself, but I don't
ch about myself either."
Bads Recent Works .
uthor of four books of
ierwin read almost en-
mn his recent works those'
scriptive of both "those
er departed" and those

sense of estrangement from what
is past."
Because he had always been
bothered since he had first found
out, he wrote a poem, Merwin said,
in the form of a letter entitled
dTo My Brother Hanson" who had
died 15 mpinutes after his birth,
two years before Merwin was born,
because he "had always been
bothered by it."
"Home for Thanksgiving," re-
cently published in "Nation"
'magazine, contrasts the various
results of the Ulysses legend in
the person of a sourdough just
returned from the frontier.
Include Translation
Merwin also included a poem,
translated by him, from the
Roman poet Catullus.
Merwin's books include: "A
Mask For Janus," "The Dancing
Bears," "Green With Beasts," and
most recently "The Drunk in The
Furnace."I

Police Hold
Local Man
In Custody
A 28-year-old Ann Arbor res-
taurant worker went on an ap-
parent rampage of destruction
Monday morning in the Michigan
Union, Frederick Kuenzel, Union
General Manager reported yester-
day.
John D. Pappanastos allegedly
went "beserk" in the Anderson
Rm. of the Union at 9 a.m.' "He
threw half a dozen chairs from
one end of the room, to the other,
breaking three of them. Then he
dropped two stacks of dishes and
shattered them," Kuenzel said.
Police are holding Pappanastos
on a charge of "malicious destruc-
tion." His brother flew in from
Chicago yesterday and helped re-
instate the cost of damages to the
Union.

PANHEL WORKSHOPS:
Discuss Affiliated Role
In Campus, Community

DIAL
2-6264

t~I Lc.

r

Shows at 1 :10 - 3:0
5:00 - 7:00 and 9:C
Features at 1 :30 - 3:
5:25 -_7:25 and 9:2

I

W. S. MERWIN
... poetic departure

Ited his own family history
kground for several of his
)ems. "My grandfather was
pilot on the Allegheny and
us drunk. I only met him a
nes in my life and perhaps
eading into him, but he
to me to be another Ulysses

"

or Girls
unce Cast

abstraction, or flight, from
T.is the theme of the Junior
Play.
play, "Tcartsba," abstract
I backwards, will be set in
ye jungle.
cast for the play is as
s:
Is, Beth Dildman, '62A&D,
Weiner, '62, Carol Simpson,
inda Rothen, '62, Sharon
rn, '62Ed., Susan Guffey, '62,
ret Dood, '62, Jade Miller,
D, Lynn Cockerhill, '62.
rus members are Sondra
s, Martha Glomset, '62, Su-
achtel, '1E, Sallie Gara-
'62, Margaret Curtis, '62SN,
Cohen, '62Ed, Bonnie Boehn-
, Aline Lindberg, '82, Alice
'62, Karen Kuhr, '62Ed.,
Aagesen, '62A&D, Susan
'62, Barbara Perlman, '62,
L Shriver, Cornelia Arnos,
Sharon Levine, '62Ed., Susan
m, '62, Julie Kempf, '62Ed.,;
s, Susan Bicoll, '62, Sandra
Un, '62SN, Beverly Wartena,
arbara Condon, '62Ed., Ter-
able, '62, Judy Householder,,
ran Lynch, '62, Marilyn Hart,
Patricia Johnston, 'O2BAd.,
i Miller, '62Ed., Joanna Jury,
first all-cast rehearsal will
10:30 a.m. Saturday at the
n's League.
play is slated for presenta-
[arch 23, 24 and 25.

figure," Merwin said as a preface
to several poems about his grand-
father.
"My grandmother, who lived to
be nearly 100 and remembered the
Civil War with great vehemence
and some clarity, is the one left
home in the Ulysses legend," Mer-
win commentedAin introducing his
poem "Grandmother at the Win-
dow."
"Things," another poem read by
its author, concerned as Merwin
noted "the subliminal advertising
of possessions."
Possession Keep People
"Possessions are one of the
things that keep people from de-
parting," Merwin said. "The
American experience on this is
vague since American value their
possessions without loving them
as other nationalities do."
"A Letter from Gussie" express-
ed "a person who was destroyed
by the inability to depart."
In "Climization" Merwin used
the symbol of a beggar to illus-
trate "a choice of emptinesses."
"The beggar offers the easy way
out instead of degradation, show-
ing man's hesitation on the point
of departure," Merwin said.
Senses Estrangement
"In Night Fields" describes "the
voyage through dissillusion of one
already departed" while "October"
shows what Merwin called "A
ROTC Units
t'apMembers
For Honorary
Know all ye citizens'
That all true knights
Must through squireship
Go by starlight;
Know all ye citizens
That many squires
Train by starlight
To become sires;
Know all ye citizens
Your obligations
For these men train c
To lead our nation;
Know all ye citizens
By the Five Stars
OF SCABBARD AND BLADE:
Squires these men are: James
R. Blaker, '61, James. E. Allen,
'61NR, Michael L. Campbell,
'61BAd., Elmer C. Binford, '61BAd.,
Duane W. Ackerman, 6'2, John E.
Howell, '62, Richard H. Kirsch-
man, '62E, Phillip G. Klintworth,
'62E, Victor E. Mix, '62E, Frederick
C. Meyer, '61, Kenneth W. Neuch-
terlein, '62E, Perry W. Morton,
'61, Minston K. Pendleton, '62E,
Keith S. Peyton, '62E, Richard L.
Palmer, '63Ed., Michael D. Rapp,
'62, William H. Reed, 16'NR, John
L. Richardson, '62, Richard E.
Siemon, '62E, Richard M. Siefert,
'6lBAd., Richard A. Swanson,
John J. Taylor, '63E, Paul V. Whit-
'61BAd., Dustan T. Smith, '62E,
more, '62, and Joseph P. Yaney,
'61.

By MICHAEL OLINICK

'4i

The Executive Committee of the
Interfraternity Council took action
yesterday to punish the pledges of
Alpha Epsilon Pi for their part in
a prank which hospitalized several
members of the fraternity.
Thp committee unanimously
moved to recommend to the Office
of the Dean of Men that the ini-
tiation date of the pledge class
be set no earlier than April 10.
The original time for initiation of
the fall pledges was to be around
Feb. 1.
The April initiation will be con-
tingent upon the completion of 15
hours per pledge of community
service work coordinated and regu-
lated by IFC. The work must be
certified by both the AEPi pledge
trainer and the IFC Fraternity
Services chairman.
Approve Service Work
"It is the opinion of the Execu-
tive Committee that properly car-
ried out, such community service
work will to some extent mitigate
the unfavorable reflections cast
upon AEPi and the Michigan fra-
ternity system as a result of the
prank," IFC President Jon Trost,
'61, said.
IFC will send letters of censure
concerning the affair to the local
and national offices of AEPi, to its
chapter advisor and to its alumni
corporation.
The prank involved a "smoke

bomb" which forced the members
out of the fraternity house. Three
of the actives went back into the
building to see if anyone was left
inside.
As they ran through the vapor,
they inhaled too much and had
to go to Health Service for treat-
ment. They were released the next
day.
The Executive Council thinks
that this is a constructive punish-
ment and not merely a punitive
one as cancellation of social privi-
leges or a fine would be, Stuart
Dow, '62, fraternity relations chair-
man said.
Prank Not Malicious
"The prank was not a malicious
one but rather one of poor judg-
ment."
"This kind of prank hurts the
fraternity system because of the
community's reaction to it and
its feeling that the whole system
is but a series of such incidents.
Therefore, we are emphasizing the
service aspect of our punishment."
The pledges will do work for the
various community groups.
Outlaws Pledge Raids
AEPi President David Barnett,
'61, said that his fraternity has
voted to outlaw pledge raids tem-
porarily. "No long range legisla-
tion has been written into our
constitution, but it will be."
He said that the 14 pledges
would be treated as such until
April and would be given extra
work and service duties. They will
sand and varnish the floors of
the fraternity house, Barnett said.

ALPHA EPSILON PI:
IFC Penalizes Pledge Class
For 'Smoke Bomb' Prank

By ANNE BOMESBERGER
and JUDITH OPPENHEIM
At the Panhellenic Workshop
yesterday, five, separate discussion
groups considered the topics of
Panhel and Alumni, *Panheland
the Campus, Panhel and the Sor-
ority, Panhel and the Faculty and
Panhel and the Administration.
In the workshop on Panhel and
the Campus the problem of rising
University enrollment was dis-
cussed in terms of affiliated hous-
ing.
There are currently 24 recog-
nized sororities on this campus, 22
of which have houses. It is esti-
mated that slightly, more than a
third of the girls presently rushing
can be accommodated in sororities
without these groups becoming too
large to function according to their
purpose of providing a close group
in which all members know and
like each other.
Reach Maximum
Some girls who live in sororities
of 60 or '70 members said that
they considered the present size of
their houses the maximum for
desirable living conditions.,
It was proposed that should the
number of undergraduate women
at the University reach 10 or 12
thousand during the next twenty-
five years, affiliated housing would
become a minority on the campus
and could easily be done away
with, should anyone make a seri-
ous attempt to do so.
Some alternatives proposed were
more varied types of living units
especially cooperative housing and
apartments. The consensus was,
however, that sorority living pro-
vides a unique atmosphere which
cannot attain to unaffiliated living.
The Panhel- and Alumni work-
shop spent the last half of its
discussion period discussing dis-
crimination and discriminatory
clauses in sorority constitutions.
Under Pressure
It was explained that although
many local chapters wish to do
away with discriminatory provi-
sions in their constitutions, their
alumni, wishing to maintain tra-
dition, and their national chapters,
wishing to appease local chapters
on campuses all over the country,
LSA. Group Plans
Open Discussion
An open meeting of the literary
college steering committee will be
held at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 1011
Angell Hall.
The discussion will concern dis-
tribution requirements. All stu-
dents who have petitioned for
steering committee positions are
encouraged to participate.

particularly in the southern states,
cannot allow the provisions to be
removed from the constitutions.
In discussing the non-discrimi-
nation regulation considered at
last night's Student Government
Council meeting, the workshop
participants expressed confusion
as to the exact nature of the un-
written criteria of selection spe 0-
fled in the motion.
No decision was reached on how
discrimination can be effectively
combatted. It was pointed out,
however, that many sororities have
withdrawn from their national or-
ganizations and "gone local" in
order to comply with their univer-
sities' non-discrimination stipula-
tions.
Lack Communication
Participants in the Panhel and
the Sorority workshop raised the
issue that there is too little com-
munication between individual
sorority women and Panhellenic
Association.
They admitted that they knew
little of Panhel's purposes and
achievements. Some expressed a
desire for a re-evaluation of the
association, and .the consensus was
that each girl should have the
opportunity to attend at least one
Panhel meeting.
Dean Deborah Bacon and Prof.
Marvin Felheim of the English
department spoke at the workshop
on Panhel and the Administration
and Panhel and the Faculty repre-
sentative.
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Reports of
Dean Bacon and Prof. Felhelm's
speeches will appear In tomorrow's
Daily.)

-is

A different
Opera every
day-

Ui L

I

Mill

IN4DA ETTOR~E GEORGES
CRISTAL *MANNI1. MARCUAL
SCltSaMASCOQk
COLOR by DE &1=1

I lr

Overture . Bellini's NORMA
FRIDAY: "PAGLIACCI'

--- --

~RNA BERGER.
,WlILL1 DOMGRAF-I
FASSBENDER-

OPENING TONIGHT
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS - Dept. of Speech

The Ypsilanti Players
present
Tennessee Williams
"TH E ROSE TATTOO"

Sean O'Cosey's wayward comedy
PURPLE

Dec. 9 and 10

8:30 P.M

at Quirk Theater
(on EMU campus)
STUDENTS 50c
Readt the Classifieds
ED MC CURDY
"The world's finest Folk Singer"
-Rawhide
Appearing Nightly (except Mon--
day) from 9:00 P.M. until Down
CAFE GALERIE
19940 Livernois, Detroit
UN 2-4455

DUST

II

8:00 P.M.

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatra

M .

I

Season subscribers:
Exchange coupons now
for tickets to
SEASON OF THE BEAST
JAN. 10-14

Box office open
10 -8 Daily
Thursday-$1.50, $1.00
Fr'. & Sat. -$1.75, $1.25
Sunday -$1.50, 1.00

Students,
1 Contest

PHOTOS

11

It

by

I GALA HANUKA PARTY! l

seniors in the business
yesterday received a trophy
inning a "Business Bowl,"
est sponsored by a leading
nics and computing firm,
v. 11 in Chicago.
competition with opponents
eight other universities, the
sity team was victorious in
siness game," where actual.
ss practices were simulated.
h team acted as a firm com-j
in the business situation,
he effects of their decisions
determined by computers-
winners were Phillip Smith,
I., James Hannah, '6lBAd.,
Upson, '61BAd., and David
p, '61BAd.
ce To Choose
icers Tonight
ieeting of Voice will be held
0 p.m. today in Rjm. D-E of
eague to elect officers.
campus political party will
ear an SGC progress report
liscuss present and future
's.1

BUD-MOR

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SUN., DEC. 11, 8 P.M
GLICK SOCIAL HALL, 1429 Hill St.
Come and have fun as guests of H illel, S. Z. O.,
and the Israels Student Club

-41

ban Openiitf.l

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Michigan Daily

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Hi-Fl, &TY CENTER

Everyone come ... because there will
\ N\ever Be
\A 4\n other
\A \ICampus
\ C\hristmas
P 4arty
4
Like the one at the LEAGUE on FRIDAY

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VT Mr

O'Brien To Run
For Local Court
Judge Francis L. O'Brien, of
Ann Arbor Municipal Court, has
announced that he will seek an-
other six-year term to the non-
partisan post in the citywide
elections this spring.
O'Brien was appointed to the
post in 1949 to fill a vacancy and
was subsequently elected in his
own right later that year.
He is a graduate of Eastern
Michigan University at Ypsilanti
and the University Law School,

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