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December 03, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-03

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~y, fECEM1ER 3,1960THNE MICHIGAN DAILY
* IN LAOS:
resid nt-eect icksBellSay Bonn __

years.
Ordinarily the man a party
nominates for President is looked
on as the party's leader even if
he loses the election.. But Rocke-
feller refuses to go along with
that, declaring instead for a col-
lective leadership.
Takes 'Tour'
Rockefeller showed up 13 min-
utes late yesterday for breakfast
with Nixon. He explained he had
been taking "the tour"-that is,
looking over the reconstruction of
the Capitol's east front and the
erection of stands for the inaugur-
ation of Democrat John F. Kenne-
dy Jan. 20.
Nixon, who ran Kennedy a
close race, commented: "I'll have
to do that myself some time."
Reporters overheard the ex-
change but detected no pa.ticu-
lar wistfulness on Nixon's part
nor any hint that Rockefeller
might be dreaming of the possi-
btlity he will someday face the
inauguration ceremony stands
himself.
He has announced for re-elec-
tioni to the New York governor-
ship in 1962, but has declined to
say whether he'll try again in
1964 for the Republican presiden-
tial nomination.
Rockefeller and Nixon were to-
gether for an hour and a half.
Reporters Question
The Governor, under question-
ing by reporters, repeated his
stand that Nixon is the party's;
titular leader but that the actual
head is the chairman of the GOP;
national committee, Sen. Thrus-
ton B. Morton. He said that is
so because the party operates
through the national committee.
Eisenhower repeated Thursday
night at a White House dinner
attended by both Rockefeller and
Nixon that the Vice-President
should be regarded as the party
chief.
Eisenhower first made the
statement to a similar dinner
Wednesday night, after Rockefel-
ler had taken his stand on Nixon
being only the titular leader.
On both occasions Eisenhower,
phrased his salute to Nixon in the
form of a toast.
Breakfast Meeting
The breakfast meeting was the
first time Nixon and Rockefeller
had gotten together since the
election campaig'n, in which the
governor worked for Nixon in New
York and other states. New York,
however, went Democratic.
Rockefeller told newsmen they
will continue to work together,
through Chairman Morton and
otaer means. He said they realize
the problems facing the country
are great, and that their party
must take a positive rather than
negative position.

11

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BUDGET APPOINTMENT - President-elect John F. Kennedy
stands with his newly appointed Budget Director, Harvard execu-
tive David E. Bell. Kennedy has promised a new appointment
today, possibly North Carolina's Gov, Luther Hodges, as secre-
tary of commerce.
Samuelson Cites Nation's
UnemploymentProblem
By JEROME WEINSTEIN that he would take any kind of
The najor task of the new ad- position with the new administra-
ministration will be to reduce un- tion if it meant leaving his teach-
employment according to Prof. ing position; any position he
Paul A. Samuelson of the Massa- would take would be a "technical"
chusetts Institute of Technology, one, not a political one.
Prof. Samuelson, a member of Prof. Stolper commented on how
President-elect John F. Ken- the new administration would re-
nedy's "brain trust," speculated on act to the economic problems be-
some of the economic problems fore it, and suggested that it
facing the new administration in would not be in any way radical.
an article abstracted in this week's The present administration, Prof.
issue of "U.S. News and World Stolper said, has just "looked
Report." away" from problems; the next,
He believes the best way to re- he feels confident, will attempt to
duce unemployment would be to sincerely grapple with the prob-
increase spending for defense, lems confronting it.
education, rehabilitation of de- Part of the dilemma facing the
pressed areas and highway con- new administration, Stolper be-
struction. lieves, is quite simply a choice
Relax Policy between a price rise and less un-
He pointed out that a more re- employment on the one hand and
laxed fiscal policy and more public a decline in prices and a rise in
Sding would not necessarily I unemployment on the other.

WASHINGTON (A)-President-
elect John F Kennedy yesterday
tapped David E. Bell, an experi-
enced Harvard executive, to man-
age the government's vast budget.
He said he hopes to have his
cabinet nearly complete by the
end of next week.
Kennedy ranged through a se-
ries of conferences, visited his
wife and week-old son at George-
town Hospital and took off for
a weekend at Palm Beach, Fla.
The man who will take over the
White House Jan. 20 has prom-
ised to announce another major
appointment in Palm Beach to-
day. It could very well be that of
Gov. Luther Hodges of North
Carolina to be secretary of com-
merce.
Three Spots Filled
Nobody else has been frequently
mentioned for the commerce post.
Kennedy now has filled three top
positions outside his own staff,
and two of them went to gover-
nors.
The President-elect announced
Thursday that Gov. G. Mennen
Williams of Michigan will be as-
sistant secretary of state for Af-
rican affairs. He followed up by
selecting Gov. Abraham Ribicoff
of Connecticut as secretary of
health, education and welfare,
The third major appointment
went to Bell-a man Kennedy
never had met until Wednesday
night. In a job paying $22,500 a
year, Bell will draw up for the
President's approval plans for
spending some $80 billion a year.
To Begin Work
Bell will go to work next w4ek,
The outgoing Budget Director,
Maurice E. Stans, will be coach-
ing him until Jan. 20 as part of
a cooperative arrangement be-
tween the present administration
and the new regime that will re-
place It. They met for lunch yes-
terday.
Kennedy will return to Wash-
ington Monday and call on Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower the
next day in another step toward
assuring a smooth governmental
changeover.
He conferred today with Clark
Clifford, his liaison man with the
Eisenhower administration, on
what Clifford called an accumula-
tion of routine matters related to
the transition.
He comes to the Kennedy ad-
ministration with good creden-
tials from that of former Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman. Bell was
on the staff of the budget bureau
as a top economist and on Tru-
man's staff as an administrative
assistant. He also served on a
Harvard mission that helped Pak-
istan with its economic organiza-
tion.
Kennedy took note of this back-
ground and Bell's qualifications
in what he said were three vital
areas-White House affairs, fed-
eral finances, and American spend-
ing abroad.

create inflation. Even with a rise
in the cost of living, there would
be compensation because of im-
proved goods and services.
Prof. Samuelson also stated that
the present shrinkage in United
States balance of payments is
mainly in private accouzis. For-
eign industry has increased pro-
fductivity tremendously at the same
time they have been cutting prices:
something American firms com-
peting abroad cannot easily do.
Prof. Samuelson felt though that
through research and better edu-
cation, American industry would
be able to increase productivity
and be more competitive.
'Best Economist'
Wolfgang F. Stolper, professor of
economic at the University said
that Prof. Samuelson is the "best
economist of my generation," one
who is "modern and up-to-date
... within the classical tradition."
Prof. Stolper, who has known
Samuelson since 1934, doubted

Researchers
Make ACTH
PITTSBURGH U1')-The Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh announced
Thursday a team of researchers
headed by Dr. Klaus Hofmann has
achieved the first successful syn-
thesis of the cortisone-producing
hormone ACTH.
The new synthetic hormone,
has the full biological molecule
yet reproduced synthetically by
man, the university said.
ACTH is an abbreviation for the
adrenocorticotropic hormone. It is
a hormone produced by the pitui-
tary gland, the body's so-called
master gland. It causes the cor-
tex, or outer shell, of the adrenal
gland to release cortisone and
other steriods into the system.

FIGHT CONTINUES:
Boycott of New Orleans Schools Easing

,.

NEW ORLEANS () - A white
boycott of New Orleans' integrated
schools losened still more yesterday
but Gov. Jimmie H. Davis pledged
a continuing fight for segregation.
And, the Louisiana legislature
moved quickly along the road to-
ward state aid to those parents
who want to send their children to
private segregated schools.
Ten white and one Negro pupils
attended classes at William Frantz
School and three Negro girls at-
tended McDonogh No. 19.
Six Attend
Only six white children attended
school at'William Frantz Wednes-
day.
Feelings among the women
picketing both schools still ran
high, however.
The day's principal develop-
ments came far from the two
schools. '
In Baton Rouge, the state house
of representatives passed a key
bill to provide grant in aid funds
for parents who wish to send their
children to private schools.

The bill, passed without debate,
went to the Senate on an 84-0
vote.
One s t a t e representative -
Arthur Crais of New Orleans -
explained the measure to the
House and said there was nothing
in the bill to tamper with the
public school system.
Just where such money would
come from was the question.
Continue Fight
Gov. Jimmie H. Davis said the
state would continue to fight for
school integration. If another
special session is needed, he told
a Baton Rouge press conference,
he would call one.
On. the question of funds to
finance another special sesion or
private schools, Davis told re-
porters:
"We'll sell some butter and eggs
-or something."
"I don't believe in intergrated
schools," the Governor said. "We'll
do all we can. It's a little difficult
to know what you'll do and
where .,..."

*1

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