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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 13, 1960 - Image 111

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iSILS, ANIMALS, ART:
Museums House Variety of Exhibitions

WOLVERINE CLUB

By ROBYN McMILLIN
Natural Science Museum
Have you ever seen a dinosaur?
Or a Mastadon? Or a saber-
toothed cat?
All these creatures, and many
more, are lurking around the cor-
ners in the University's Natural
Science Museum. The building can
be easily recognized by the lions
guarding the heavy double doors
at the entrance.
The display part of the museum
occupies the second, third and
fourth floors of the building. In
the "Hall of Life," on the second
floor, are ancient skeletons - of
equally ancient animals-starting'
with the tiniest forms of life for
which skeletons are available, and
going all the way up to one of
the largest . . . Anatosaurus, or
"duck-billed" dinosaur. The skull
of this creature alone weighs
about 250 pounds.
Petrodactyl Perches
The best preserved and most
complete mastadon ever found in
Michigan resides here, too. About
ot take flight from his perch on
one wall is a Pterodactyl, one of a,
group of flying reptiles that died
thousands of years ago. This little
fellow has a wing span of almost
fourteen feet.
On the third floor are more re-
cent animals: stuffed examples of'
common birds and small animals
of Michigan.
On the fourth floor is a review
of man's life from its very begin-
nines. Here, too, is the planetar-
ium, where a refuge is provided
for those who, like dark corners
... as well as those who are in-
terested in learning about the
heavens.
Howse Research Units
The parts of the museum that
fewer people are familiar with are
the research and teaching units.
In these four sections, Anthro-
pology, Paleontology, Zoology and
the Herbarium, collections appro-
priate to each group are acquired,
cared for and studied. Other func-
tions include teaching on both
graduate and undergrad levels,
maintenance of specialized librar-
ies, the publication of results of
studies of the collections and ex-
ploration and field work.

presents

YOUNG MEETS OLD
... fossils can be fun
Kelsey Museum . . .
Polished wooden floors and
'gleaming glass cases provide the
atmosphere in a small stone house
which is another of the Univer-
sity's museums, the Kelsey Mu-
seum of Archaeology.
Here one finds relics of man's
past, many of them from Egypt
and dating from about the time of
the Roman Empire. Many of these
relics come from excavations made
by the University.
Glass Jewelry and marbles made
thousands of years ago have a
startlingly modern appearance,
but ancient documents and tools
seem to have an aura of ancient
mystery about them. Statuary and
other items such as stone tablets
and gravestones are found here,
too.
Art Museum . . «

The museum's permanent coy-
lection contains Oriental, Medieval
and Renaissance art; some modern
paintings and sculpture; and
prints and drawings of all periods.
The permanent collection is sup-
plemented by objects borrowed
from the Detroit, Toledo and
Cranbrook Museums.
Over the past 15 years or so, a
considerable collection of 19th and
20th century work in various
media-paintings, drawings, sculp-
ture and prints-has been added.
These are displayed in various
groupings from time to time in the
smaller galleries.
Plan Special Exhibits
Besides the permanent collec-
tion, there are one or two travel-
ing exhibits each month, which
are rented from national sources.
Also, two or three major exhibits
each years are borrowed especially
for the museum.
For example, last spring a dis-
play of paintings from the Gug-
genheim Museum was brought to
Alumni Memorial Hall. A similar
exhibit is being planned for this
spring, the pictures to be bor-
rowed from other important mu-
seums.
The most important painting in
the museum is a fairly recent ac-
quisition, a 16th century oil by
Joos van Cleve, "St. John on Pat-
nos." Considered the most im-
portant contemporary work is a
large German expressionist paint-
ing by Max Beckmann r
Permanent Collection Grows
The permament collection is
constantly being built up. Last
spring, Prof. Charles H. Sawyer,.
director of the museum, was in
Europe investigaitng new sources
for acquisition. This trip was in
addition to several made during
the year to New York and other
places.

Diag . ..Wed., Sept. 14... 9:00 P.M.

i

LIVING EXHIBITS-Are contained in the Exhibit Museum Zoo.
Included in the miniature zoo are bear cubs, otters and foxes.

ALL CAMPUS SING

I

NOTICE TO FRESHMEN:
Upon entering the University of Michigan you will
be faced with the chore of finding the proper place
which will take care of your clothes, dry-cleaned
or laundered. to save you a lot of trouble trying
to find the right place by-trial or error-we invite
you cordially to stop in and get acquainted with us
-the right place for you, for service as you like it
when you like it.
Everything brought in thoroughly cleaned and ex-
pertly pressed; cuffs brushed and taced, missing
buttons replaced, rips mended - all these extras
included at our regular, moderate prices.
GOLD BOND CLEANERS

If ancient bones and relics don't
appeal much to you, you may find
the subject matter more inter-
esting in the Museum of Art, in
the Alumni Memorial Hall. This
is where 'the University's art col-
lection is housed. Here one can
find all, types of art, from Medi-
eval to modern.

The Museum in its present form
of organization dates from 1946.
In 1957 the building itself was re-
modeled: lighting in the becond
floor galleries was brought up to
date and a unistrut area and new
stairs to the second floor were
added to provide increased exhibi-
tion space.

515 East William
7-6 Monday-Friday -7-5 Saturday

HoURS:

KELSEY MUSEUM-The stone edifice on
archaeological exhibits.

State Street houses

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at

312 South State Street

and

1203 South University Ave

Desk and Floor
LAMPS
from 2.39

Large Assortment
THROW

Desk Book Racks

1.00 each

."

RuGs
ALL COLORS

.. .
.

FOAM FILLED

DECORATOR

PILLOWS

with zip-off corduroy case
MANY COLORS AVAILABLE

BED SPREADS

Featuring

Large Floor Model
BOOK RACK

Cannon and Fieldcrest

:<
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> >
',
:

X295 each

from 5.95

from 1.29

Large Record Racks
from 7.95

2.95

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