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September 13, 1960 - Image 110

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RANGES CONCERTS:
society Organizes Musical Productions

By BEATRICE TEODORO
ae University Musical Society
organized in 1879 for the pur-
of associating the music of
University with that of the
munity
ade up of prominent members
oth groups, it was not a per-
ing body, but rather a group
nized to manage, direct and
sor musical activities.
me of the groups that came
r the sponsorship of the Mu-
Society and which was or-
zed about the same time is the
'al Union. This began when
r members of four Ann Arbor,
ches had the revolutionary
of uniting to perform choruses
i Handel's "Messiah." The
erts were presented in the
us churches, and often the
rmembers outnumbered the
ence.
Choristers Expanded
e group decided to expand
repertoire by the addition of

Y

other choral members. They voted
to extend the membership outside
of the four churches, and the or-
ganization became known as the
Choral Union.
It has increased its membership
to more than three hundred, and
has performed operas in concert
form practically all of the great
oratorios, and smaller choral
works.
More students should be aware
of the University's unique musical
history, Gail Rector, executive
director of the Musical Society
said. ,
"Since the concerts are not re-
quired programs, it falls upon the
individual to be receptive to pre-
sentations by the world's greatest
artists," he added.
Concert Season Varied
The University Musical Society
will give 28 concerts during the
1960-61 season.
Ten concerts sponsored by the
Choral Union Series, five of the

Extra Concert Series, two "Mes-
siah" performances, three con-
certs in the Chamber Music Fes-
tival, two special concerts and six
performances during the May Fes-
tival will make up the season,
The Choral Union Series will
open Oct. 6 with the Viennese
soprano, Hilde Gueden, prima don-
na of the Metropolitan Opera and
star of the 1956 May Festival.
She will be followed Saturday,
Oct. 29, by the Boston Symphony,
under the direction of Charles
Munch. On Wednesday, Nov. 2,
the Series will present Van Cli-
burn the young American pianist.
Chorus To Come
Sunday, Nov. 6, the Branko
Krsmanovich Chorus from Yugo-
slavia will be featured. Bogdan
Babich will conduct the eighty-
voice chorus in its first American
tour.
Arthur Rubenstein, world fam-
ous pianist, will return for his
tenth Ann Arbor appearance on
Monday, Nov. 14. Following him
will be the Warsaw Philharmonic
on Wednesday, Jan. 18, under the
direction of Witold Rowicki.
Tuesday, Feb. 14, Henryk Szer-
yng, violinist, will present a con-
cert. The Swedish tenor, Jussi
Bjoerling; will perform Tuesday,
Feb. 28.
Under the direction of Paul
Kletzki, the Dallas Symphony Or-
chestra will present a concert Fri-
day, Mar. 1Q.
In the final concert of the
Choral Union Series, the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra will play,

with Walter Susskind, Music Di-
rector.
Five concerts will be presented
in the Extra Concert Series. Jer-
ome Hines, basso of the Metro-
politan and La Scala Opera Com-
panies, will appear Monday, Oct.
17.
Van Cliburn will make his Ann
Arbor debut on Monday, Oct. 31.
January 12, the Robert Shaw
Chorale and Orchestra will return.
Violinist Zino Francescatti will
make his sixth appearance here,
Mar. 21. The Series will end with
a concert by the Concertgebouw
Orchestra of Amsterdam, con-
ducted by Eugen Jochum, Apr. 23.
"Messiah" concerts Dec. 3 and
4 will feature guest soloists Phyllis
Curtin, soprano; Evelyn Beal, con-
tralto; "Walter +Carringer, tenor;
and Donald Bell, bass, accom-
panied by the University's Choral
Union and Musical Society Or-
chestra.
Slate Special Concerts
Two other special concerts are
scheduled for Rackham Aud. The
Budapest Quartet will give a spe-
cial program Mar. 26.I Soloisti Di
Zagreb, a 13-piece chamber group
directed by Antonio Janigro will
perform Nov. 7.
A chamber music festival will
be held Feb. 17, 18 and 19, featur-
ing the Vienna Octet.
Climaxing the concert season
activities for the 68th year, the
May Festival will be presented
May 4, 5, 6 and 7, and will feature
the Philadelphia Orchestra, di-
rected by Eugene Ormandy.

DRAMATIC MOMENT-From Tennessee Williams' drama, "Streetca rNamed Desire;" is pictured above in its performance by the
Arbor Civic Theatre.
Civic Theatre Provides Dramatic Variet

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September 17... 8:00-12:00 P.M.
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8:00-9:00 Jazz Concert, front steps

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