100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

TUI~'CHITEAN DAITY

RI

A U

ierican, British
cools Compared,

1 ishop Cites
Risk As Key
To Liberties

DRAMA, MUSIC:
New York, Chicago, Detroit Feature
Vacation Entertainment for Students

Rites Honor
Retired 'U' _

Professor

By JUDITH SATTLER

I

NTHIA NEU

V'

rally speaking, American
y authorities have a,
control of student activi-
a authorities at the Uni-
College London," Terry
32BAd, said in an inter-
terday. ,
who graduated last year
e University of London
)o1, is attending the Uni-
,s an exchange student.
,his undergraduate career,
rved as president of the
f the University College
the student government
of the largest college of'
versity of London.
More Independent
said the Union was more
dent than Student Govern-
uncil, having no adminis-
group controlling it, such
Board in Review of SGC.
noted that both student
tents were working in the
discrimination. "In Eng-
he said, "we don't have
>em of your South, so our
doesn't center around
sues as sit ins." Instead,
students are concerned
te issue of apartheid in
Africa, especially in higher
in.
al formerly integrated uni-
in South Africa are in!
cess of changing to all
The Union is working to
funds and text books and
up scholarships to aid non-

"In England the universities are
trying to produce specialists and
in America they are trying to
produce a generally educated
citizen," he said.
Specialized Program
For this reason, English stu-
dents take a highly spec4alized
program from the time they enter
a university. -1
"Students at the University do
not have as much responsibility for
their own work," Davis said. He
explained that at London students
take examinations toward degrees
only at the end of the last semes-
ter in the tri-semester system, and
there were not so many blue books
or daily assignments.

Board Views
Residence Hall
Agre ements
The Residence Halls Board of
Governors this week discussed
problems of students on special
University programs who live in
the residence halls only one semes-
ter.
The problem arose with naval
architecture students, who are on
a work study program, and would
lose their $50 room deposit when
they left for the work phase of
their program.
This group often includes fresh-
man who leave the residence halls
after their first semester to work
in the ship yards.'
Ordinarily residence hall con-
tracts may be broken only by
appeal to a committee represent-
ing the dean of men, the dean of
women and the business office.
Except for married students, the
committee allows few contract
cancellations.
The board also passed, subject
to the approval of details by the
Dean of Men's office, a program
to study the effect of "safe" tran-
quilizers on volunteers from Gom-
berg house who are over twenty
one.

BY BEATRICE TEODORO
Throughout history, freedom
has been obtained at the risk of
conflict, L. K. Bishop, vice-presi-i
dent of the central committee of
the National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews, said yesterday.
He told a luncheon meeting of,
the fifth annual Institute in Hu-
man Relations many early Amer-
ican colonists wanted freedom
from England, but the feeling was
not unanimous.
Declaration of Dependence
At the time the Declaration of
Independence was signed, a Dec-
laration of Dependence was issued
with the backing of at least one
third of the colonial population.
International dissension was then
added to the revolutionary strug-
gle.
In the early 20th century, the
drive for freedom was concerned
with overcoming poverty, depres-
sion and unemployment. This
again resulted in a social revolu-
tion over the controversial wel-
fare legislation of the thirties.
We are now faced with another
interpretation of freedom, Bish-
op added. The concept must be
extended to "freedom to live
where you have money to buy,
to play on public beaches, and to
eat where you have money to buy
a hamburger or a filet mignon."
Resist Change
"Society will resist change," he
said, "but it will be constantly rye-
formed. He quoted from Toynbee,
"All triumphs are brought about
by endless suffering."
The United States is wrong
when it 6elieves the American
concept of freedom is the univer-
sal standard, Bishop said. "When
people go to bedhungry every
night, have no roof over their
heads and have only one garment
to wear, they are not concerned
with voting rights or right to
work laws."
He cited incidents during the
declaration of African indepen-
dence when "natives came with
baskets asking for their share of
independence."
The definition of freedom de-
pends on the sets of values of the
people, Bishop concluded. In many
places, "the claims of the Ameri-
can type of life are meaningless."
Vinall To Speak
On 'Project Hope'
WJR newscaster Jim Vinall will
discuss "Project Hope" in a lec-
ture sponsored by the women's
honoraries at 8 p.m., Monday in
Rackham Auditorium.
"Project Hope" was formed 18
months ago under the direction of
Dr. William B. Walsh of Washing-
ton. Its purpose is to carry the
latest medical knowledge and sur-
gical techniques to underdevelop-
ed countries on the renovated
United States Navy ship, S.S. Hope.
Complimentary tickets for the
lecture are available in the League
Undergraduate office.

For school-weary vacationers,
the cities of Detroit, Chicago, and,
New York will offer many diver-
sions over the Thanksgiving re-
cess.
DETROIT-"Holiday in Japan,"
a musical with a cast of 75', open-
ed Tuesday for a two week en-
gagement at the Cass Theatre.
Jessica Tandy and Roland Cul-
ver are appearing in Detroit in
"Five Finger Exercise," a suspense
drama which won the Drama
Critics' Prize for 1960 on Broad-
way. It is playing at the Shubert
Theatre..
On Thursday and Saturday
nights, the Detroit Symphony
Orchestra will perform at Ford
Auditorium, with Leopold Ludwig
conducting and violinist Mischa
Mischakoff soloing.
Soviet pianist Sviatoslav Richter
will perform Friday evening at the
Masonic Temple. Richter's concert
is part of his first American tour.
Nat King Cole is appearing at
the Riviera Theatre in a new
musical, entitled "I'm With You."
The show is playing in Detroit
before its New York opening.
CHICAGO-Gertrude Berg and
Cedric Hardwicke will be repeat-
ing their New York success, "A
Maority of One," during the vaca-
tion at Chicago's Erlanger Theatre.
"Flower Drum Song," the
Rogers and Hammerstein musical
comedy, is being presented at the
Shubert Theatre. The New York
company is appearing.
The American Shakespeare Fes-
tival Acting Company is giving
"Midsummer Night's Dream" at
the Blackstone Theatre. Bert Lahr
is special guest star for the pro-
duction.
Tickets On Sale
Today for Musket

The International Horse Show
is opening Friday, featuring a
"world's championship rodeo." The
horse show is in conjunction with
the International Livestock Ex-
position, and is being held at the
International Amphitheatre.
NEW YORK-The theatre capi-
tol of the nation will offer many
entertainment opportunities, as
usual. New plays include "Whisper
to Me" at the Players Theatre, and
"Marcus in the High Grass," at
the Greenwich Mews Theatre,
w h i c h opened Monday, and
"Dream Play," by August Strind-
berg, which bowed Tuesday.
The last chance to see "She
Stoops to Conquer" is this vaca-
tion, as the play at the Phoenix
Theatre closes Sunday. The Gate

Theatre's production of Shaw 's'
"Man and Superman" alsoends
Sunday.
Established theatre successes
can also be seen: "My Fair Lady,"
"West Side Story," "The Music
Man," "La Plume de Ma Tante,"
"Bye, Bye, Birdie," "Fiorello,"
"The Miracle Worker," "A Thur-
ber Carnival" and others have
tickets available.
The New York City Ballet is
appearing in the world premiere of
Brahm's "Liebeslieder Walzer" at
the City Center.
The Metropolitan Opera will
present "Le Nozze Di Figaro," on
Thursday, "L'Elisir D'Amore" on
Friday, "Aida" on Saturday after-
noon, and "Carmen," Saturday
evening.

Funeral services were held yes-
terday in Boulder, Colo. for Prof.
Ivan C. Crawford, dean of the
University engineering school from
1940 to 1951.
Prof. Crawford, who died Sat-
urday, was known for his work
After retirement from the Uni-
versity in 1951, he worked as di-
rector, of. the Colorado 'Water Con-
servation Board and was elected
to the Colorado state legislature
in 1958.
Prof. Crawford served as a
part-time civil engineering pro-
fessor at the University of Den-
ver after 1951. -

I

F

V11uup pInU
Racial Action
Workshops
A workshop on non-violent di-
rect. action in race relations will
be held Friday and Saturday at
Lane Hall.
The workshops will feature ac-
tion projects as well as discus-
sions of philosophy and method.
Registration will take place at 1:30
Friday, immediately followed by a
panel discussion at .2:30. Follow-
ing the panel presentation, the
group will break up into small
discussion groups.
A keynote speech by Gerald
Bullock of the Congress of Racial
Equality at 8 p.m. will highlight
the workshop.

ENDING TONIGHT
One Show Only
at 7:30 P.M.
- t.Y s Y~ Yi YY Y I i i

DIAL
NO 8-6416

THREE EXCITING HOURS
OF BRILLIANT FILM ART
Shown together for the first time
SERGEI EISENSTEIN'S
-M *. RI1RiIMUI' .

'I

STARTING
THURSDAY

Than ucfStrauss.4

Spectacular in
Eastmancolor

I

U

'

'3

No Traditions
ollege has a long tradition
having traditions," Davis
ien the University College
was, originated, the two
al universities, Cambridge
ford, were Angelican. Uni-
College London, later in-
ed into the University of
was set up with no reli-
filiation, and to the pre-
e gives no consideration to
i's race or religion.
saw a general difference
the goals of higher edu-
n the United States and

Filters for

flavor

""" """""

I

Tickets for the 1960 Musket pro-
duction of Kismet will be sold be-
tween one and five p.m. today at
the Michigan Union. These tickets
will not be sold between nine and
twelve a.m.
CAFE
PROMETH EAN
508 E. William
FRI. & SAT.
FRENCH FOLK SONGS
--- 9 PM.on Sunday-
JAZZ
featuring the New Musi of the
Omar Clay-Bob James Trio

-finest flavor by far!

'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
(Jointly with Beth Israel Center)
presents
PROFESSOR FRANK CROSS
Authority of the Dead Sea Scrolls
speaking on,
"ESSENE MESSIAHS and HILLEL"
Mon., Nov. 28-8:15 P.M. 1429 Hill
ANNUAL ZWERDLING LECTURE SERIES

speaking

Mon. and Tues., Nov. 28, 29 ... 4:15
Aud. A, Angell Hall

PPPMM P

1.

... . conveniently located . .
economy minded ... home-like
comfort4. .. that's why the Aller-
ton Hotel is Chicago headquar-
ters for many school groups,
business and professional stu-
dent affairs, field trips, athletic
teams, debate teams, speech
clinics, tours, etc.
For your own Chicago visit or
week-end stay choose the hotel

ring
y I C'm

It's a
MntIs

ENDING TONIGHT
A maiden voyage of laughs
"THE CAPTAIN'S

w

ay

Dial NO 5-6290- TABLE"
DilN -20 Comedy ., , IN COLOR
all the way from Seattle to Nome-
FOR FUN-FILLED ADVENTURE-WIDE OPEN AND RAW!

To stay alive
in this place
FIGHT for
what you want...
and take what
you can get!,

JOHN
STEWART

Tareyton has the tst -r
Dual Filter
does t!

Here's how the DUAL FilTER DOES IT:
1. It combines a unique inner filter of ACTIVATED CHARCOAL
... definitely proved to make the taste of a cigarette mild and
smooth..
2 with a pure white outer filter. Together they select and balance
the flavor elements in the smoke. Tareyton's flavor-balance gives
you the-best taste of the best tobaccos.

A

NEW DULFILTER aeyo
fj ~ LAI roudofJ.~meic .~wf -/da eo i or idl nme*dwto -

- - - 1 1 d a0 # j

Pradct o ,uaa~ar u ur mddl nar c~r.

r

Big Sam
and Angel
': the pleasure
'palace doll! He
was big enough'
to conquer the
land...she knew
how to conquer
,im!

AS HIS PARNER
BnIE
[US

\ n\AOM \DIAL
ELIS\
11 n111,\ut\\;1 \

f

.";FUN LOVING
GIANTS...
1W LAUGHING AND
BRAWLING
ALL OVER
ALASKAI
I

ES l

1I 5 1 1I0 1 "

I

,I

CO-STARR ING
JULIET
PRO WSE

S

CINRI'VIASccOFE
COLOR by DE LUXE
h 9.

0 Wo SIMIFNUB 'N-7'AE, M £T om~mo

r}.^' .....: :k '::<% "r :f 7 : t' . . '' , r b:+5;.,; r:{ .:y:: ri'"i:#,r r . { i+:.n .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan