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November 22, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_THE MICHIGAN DAILY

soviets Oust U.S. Official
or Alleged Es-pionage.

I

Say Attache ENDS ASTRONAUT
Musteave U.S Fail

HOPES:
To, Launch Space Capsule

Immediately
McDonald Fourth,
Diplomat Ejected
MOSCOW P)- Maj. Irving T.
McDonald, assistant United States
air attache, yesterday was ordered
to leave the Soviet Union.
Accused of illegal intelligence
activities, he is the fourth United
States embassy official to be ex-
pelled in 13 months on some form
of espionage charge.
Minister Counsellor Edward L.
Freers was called to the Soviet
Foreign Office yesterday after-
noon and told that McDonald's
presence in the Soviet Union was'
no longer desirable and he must
leave as soon as possible,
Charge Posing
Freers was told by the chief of
the foreign office's American sec-
tion that "competent authorities
established that McDonald was
continuing intelligence activities
incompatible with the status of an
accredited diplomatic worker."
The Soviet official charged that
McDonald -posed as a tourist near
the city of Kharkov Oct. 18 in an
area around military installations.
He was given a warning then, the
official said.
Connected with Kirton
The Russians previously had
connected McDonald with the case
of Col. Edwin M. Kirton of Palo
Alto, Calif., United States Air
Attache expelled Aug. 10.
McDonald was given a warning
at the time of Kirton's expulson,
and Soviet authorities said steps
would be taken against him "if
he does not cease impermissible
activities." The embassy denied
the charges against both men.
In Washington, State Depart-
ment officials were not surprised.
They said that after McDonald
received his warning in August
his expulsion was regarded as a
virtual certainty.
It was supposed here that Mc-
Donald's expulsion was a retalia--
tion for the arrest of Igor Y.
Melekh, chief of the Russianl
translation section of the United
Nations.

CAPE CANAVERAL (W)-Amer-
ica's hopes of rocketing a man into
space early next year were dealt a
crushing blow yesterday by the
third straight failure of an un-
manned space capsule launching.
One official said yesterday's fiz-
zle may have forfeited this nation's
last chance to beat Russia in the
race to send the first man aloft.
Soviet scientists are believed
putting every effort into sending a
man into orbit within a few
months. They showed they appar-
ently.. have the capability when
they hurled a five-ton animal-lad-
en spacecraft into orbit and
brought it back to earth unharmed
last August.
A Redstone rocket was to carry
the one-ton project Mercury cap-
sule 130 miles up and 220 miles
down the Atlantic missile range
yesterday. The shot-most impor-
tant so far in the Mercury pro.-
gram-was to be a vital forerun-
ner of a plan to boost a United
States astronaut on an identical
16-ninute ballistic flight next
February or March. A manned or-
bit flight is scheduled for late
1961.
The Redstone ignited when the
countdown reached zero. But an
automatic sequence system detect-
ed last-second trouble and ordered
engine cutoff.
Almost simultaneously, a rock-
et escape tower broke loose from
the capsule and shot several thou-
sand feet into the air, spiralingj
back to the cape and landing
about 2,000 feet from the launch!
pad. The tower is 151/ feet tall'
and propelled by three small solid-
fuel rockets. It jerks the capsule
free and gets it safely back to
earth in case of a malfunction in
the booster.
The 83-foot Redstone and the
bell-shaped capsule remained on
the pad, apparently undamaged.
All seven astronauts were here
for the test. The National Aero-
nautics and Space Administration
(NASA) refused to let newsmen
talk to them about the abortive
attempt.
Asked if the flop would delay
the program, which already is
crawling at a snail's pace, Gilruth
replied: "It certainly doesn't help."

WHITE HOUSE:
Kennedy
To Make
Staff Cut
PALM BEACH, Fla. toP)-Presi-
dent-elect John F. Kennedy ex-
pects to wipe out the powerful post
of Assistant to the President and
to slash the White House staff
sharply.
Kennedy's chief liaison man with
the Eisenhower administration,
Clark M. Clifford, outlined the
prospects to newsmen after all-
day sessions with the man who
will be the next chief executive.
Clifford said there has been no
discussion of a heavy cut or big
overturn on down the line through
the various government depart-
ments and agencies.
To Perform Duties
Theodore Sorensen, Clifford said,
will come closest to performing
the duties now handled by the
about to be abolished position of
"the" assistant to the president.
Clifford said, however, he would
rather not comment on whether
Sorensen will become the ranking
member of the White House staff.
The title Kennedy has listed for
Sorensen is that of special coun-
sel. He could very well wind up
with some sort of vague unofficial
designation as assistant president,
corresponding to the role of Harry
L. Hopkins in the Roosevelt Ad-
ministration.
Close to Kennedy
Through the years, Sorensen
probably has been closer to Ken-
nedy than any other person, in
launching and helping direct the
carefully conceived campaign that
will put Kennedy in the White
House Jan. 20.
Wilton B.2Persons now is the
assistant to President Dwight D.
Eisenhower. Before him it was
Sherman Adams, who resigned un-'
der congressional attacks that he
accepted favors in return for
favors.
The White House staff now has
51 persons in top roles-not count-
ing the clerks and secretaries. In
the Truman Administration, Clif-
ford said the total was about 15.
He wouldn't speculate on how
many such positions Kennedy will
have-positions such as press and
appointment secretaries, and ad-
ministrative assistants.

FOR GIFTED WOMEN:
Radcliffe Sets New Program
4'

--APWirephoto
REDSTONE FAILURE-Cape Canaveral scientists were dealt
their third setback In as many tries when the Redstone missile,
carrying a unmanned space capsule failed, at the last moment, to
take off successfully. The adjoining tower structure did blast off,
however.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Rad-
cliffe College has announced a
dramatic new program to harness
the talents of "intellectually dis-
placed women" whose high educa-
tional attainments now. remain
unused.
The experimental program, to
be known as the Radcliffe Insti-
tute for Independent Study, aims
at opening new opportunities for
highly educated women, especially
those who have doctorates but
lack a professional outlet for their
talents.
The program, set to start in
September, 1961, is seen as a
historic advance in the higher
education of women, breaking
sharply with what the proposal
calls traditional "orthodoxy." Its
originators consider it a vital
step to end a major loss of tal-
ent, which at present is intoler-
able to the nation and "disas-
trous" for many women in their
own lives and careers.
Harvard Support
These originators have the sup-
port of Harvard University's top
officials, including Dr. Nathan M.
Pusey, president.
The institute, which was orig-
inated by Mrs. Mary I. Bunting,
Radcliffe's new president, is ex-
pected to be a pilot enterprise that
will be adopted across the coun-
try. It is also expected to be an
important key in the general re-
form and up-dating of women's
undergraduate education.
The nucleus of the institute
will be a group of gifted but not
necessarily w i d e l y recognized
women, appointed annually, who
will be known as associate schol-
ars. Generally, though not neces-
sarily, they will hold doctorates
or the equivalent in "achievement
and status"'
'Gifted Women'
They may be artists, writers,
historians, scientists, social scien-
tists or "women concerned with
any reach of scholarship or crea-
tive art," according to the pros-
pectus. The key to their selection
will be "evidence of past accom-
plishment and the promise of. pur-
poseful activity in a specific plan
of work."
There are to be twenty appoint-
ments in the first year.
Associate scholars, who need not
be Radcliffe alumnae, will receive1
an annual stipend of $3,000 for
their part-time appointments.
Mrs. Bunting believes that among
them may be "a female Toynbee"
who otherwise might have been
merely an educated woman "inter-
ested" in philosophy and history.
Make this Christmas
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Since most of the scholars will.
be "talented women whose career
has been interrupted by marriage
or some other circumstance and
who finds it difficult, if not im-
possible, without incentive to re-
turn to'sustained intellectual cre-
ativity," the experimental pro-
gram will at first draw the non-
resident associates from the Bos-
ton area. Eventually, as other in-
stitutions are persuaded to join,
it is hoped that the program will
become nation-wide.
The institute will offer the
scholar "time that is free of per-

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE; SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIE
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADlMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 23 to February 2, 1961
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "ti
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. P
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or t
special periods may use any examination period provided there
no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflici
resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedi
Each student should receive notification from his instruc
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time of Class* Time of Examination
(at 8 Thursday, January 26 9
(at 9 Monday, January 30 9
(at 10 Wednesday, February 1 9
(at 11 Tuesday, January 24 9
MONDAY (at 12 'Tuesday, January 24 2
(at 1 Tuesday, January 24 2
(at 2 Monday, January 23 9
(at 3 Saturday, January 28 2
(at 4 Monday, January 23 2-

sonal pressures and obliga
a place to work; all the fa
of a great university from
ies to laboratories, from mu
to computers; the companie
and guidance of renowned a
ities in hundreds of fields
the financial means for the
fied woman to take advant
all this without abandonir
domestic responsibilities."
The aim is to offer sucha
"a way to renew her comm
to her area of specialized k
edge" to make her again "
professionally."
(Copyright New York Times, Inc

FOR U.S. GOVERNMENT:
Senators Reject 'Prime Minister' Plan

(at 8 Saturday, January 28
(at 9 Tuesday, January 31
(at 10 Thursday, February 2
(at 11 Wednesday, January 25
TUESDAY (at-12 Thursday, February 2
(at 1 Thursday, February 2
(at 2 Friday, January 27
(at 3 Wednesday, February 1
(at 4 Wednesday, January 25
* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at
preceding hour.

9-

Broken lenses duplicated
* Frames replaced
- Contact lens fluid sold
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
240 Nickels Arcade NO 2-9116,

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20

WASHINGTON (A) -- The pro-
posal for a "First Secretary" of
the government, to act in the role
of an American prime minister,
was rejected yesterday by a Sen-
ate group.
The turndown came from Sen.
Henry M. Jackson (D-Wash), and
the staff of his Senate subcom-
mittee on national policy-making
machinery.
The effect was to pour cold
water on a plan which President'
Dwight D. Eisenhower has been
expected to recommend.
Advances Idea
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of
New York, who headed Eisen-
hower's advisory committee on
government organization, ad-
vanced the idea of a super-secre-
tary to exercise delegated Presi-
dential authority on all national
security affairs "at the prime min-
isterial level."
Secretary of State Christian A.,
Herter and other witnesses before
Jackson's comnittee endorsed the
general idea earlier this year. Her-
ter, however, said the Secretary of
Untonists Seek,
Cabi net Post
WASHINGTON (M-)-Labor un-
ion leaders are pressing Presi-
dent-elect John F. Kennedy to put1
a union man in the cabinet.
They feel the time has comel
for unions again to have represen-
tation at the top government lev-
el. This, they suggest, could bel
accomplished by putting one of
their number in as secretary oft
labor or in some other cabinet
post.
President-elect Kennedy is to
confer here tomorrow with Georget
Meany, AFL-CIO president, and
possibly other federation leaders.t

not ease the problems now faced
by a President in setting and
maintaining our national course.
"In fact, such additions to the
policy process would make his bur-
dens heavier."
Jackson in no way suggested
that he spoke for anyone but him-
self. However, his position in the
middle of Democratic policy coun-
cils makes it probable that his
view coincides with that of Presi-
dent-elect John F. Kennedy. Sen.
Kennedy sat in on some of the
Jackson committee's hearings.
In criticizing the first secretary
idea, the Jackson Committee staff
said the plan at first glance would
appear to lighten the load on the
President.
View Shortcomings
But closer analysis reveals "seri-
ous shortcomings and limitations"
in the idea, the group said. The
secretaries of state and defense,
for instance, would continue to re-
port directly to the President, it
pointed out, and the placement of
a First Secretary between them
and the President "would inevit-
ably generate friction And resent-
men t."
The report continued:
"A First Secretary could gain
the power he needed only if the
President consistently accepted the
First Secretary's Judgment over
that of his department heads.
"But if the President were con-
sistently so deferential to his First
Secretary, who then would be
President?
"And who would then be willing
to be cabinet officers?"

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Business Administration 150
Business Administration 180
Finance 101
Finance 110
Finance 201
Ind. Relations 100, 200
Id. Relations 150
Insurance 170
Insurance 172
Management 110
Management 111
Marketing 100, 101, 200,
201, 210
Marketing 211
Marketing 212
Statistics 100, 150, 200

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OFBUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Wednesday, February 1
Monday, January 23
Thursday, February 2
Friday, January 27
Monday, January 30
Monday, January 23
Friday, January 27
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 31
Saturday, January 28
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 24
Monday, January 30
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23

2-

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Look like your
Very best coat
You'd never believe it is
water-repellent, made of
wool jersey with curon
lining.
Of wide wale velvet-
look corduroy and vel-
veteen. Wonderful top-'
ping for your dress-up
dresses, at $35.00.
Illustrated at right is just one
of an unusual collection of
0-So-Wearable Coats

NELSON ROCKEFELLER
. . . advances plan
State should be the official who
should have "clear: primacy" in
policy decisions affecting security.
Issues Report
Sen. Jackson issued a report of
the committee staff. It analyzed
the first-secretary plan and said:
"Our governmental machinery
his no place for a First Secretary.
"... the President of the United
States . . . cannot be relieved of
his burdens by supplying him with
a 'deputy' to do what only he can
do."
Jackson. now serving as chair-
man of the Democratic National
Committee, issued a statement
concurring. The Senator added:
"Super-cabinet officers or above-
the-department superstaffs would

C.E. 53
Eng. Graphics 1(A)
Eng. Graphics 1(B)
Eng. Graphics 2, 4
E.E. 5
E.M. 2
English 11
LITERATURE, SC
Botany 1, 2
Chemistry 3, 5E, 15, 182, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Economics 71, 72
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 3, 11, 12,
21, 22, 31, 32
French 61, 62
Geology 11
Geography 1
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Latin 21, 22
Physics 53
Pol. Science 11
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 3, 21, 22, 31, 32

Friday, January 27
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 31
Monday; January 30
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 30
Wednesday, January 25
IENCE, AND THE ARTS
Monday, January 23
Wednesday, February 1
Friday, January 27
Wednesday, February 1
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Wednesday, January 25
Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 31
Friday, January 27
Thursday, January 26
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 30
Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27

2-
2-

2-5
2-5

2
2

2-
2-
2-
2-

It's Thanksgiving .

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

. . . ,

I, I

,... *"'"

KHAYYAM
IMPORTED GIFTS and JEWELRY
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS

and Chester Roberts
has a complete selection
of
Hallmark and Contemporary
Thanksgiving Cards

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the conser
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts betwee
assigned examination ptriods must be reported for adjustmeni
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W.E. between Decen
ber 5 and 16.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the conser
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
/ SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied mus
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit c
the University. For time and place of examination see bulleti
board of the School of Music.

at

BEAUTIFUL

IMPORTED

PANITA

JUST A REMINDER,..

That Chester Roberts Gifts

I 'AJ'*Pi% FtCT"I~kAcICESAC1I I

c

I

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