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November 13, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


conciliation Commission
o Speak with Kasavubu

Police Hold
Stanleyville
At Gunpoint.
STANLEYVILLE, The Congo ()
-, Mutinous military policemen
hold this capital city of the
Congo's Oriental Province at gun-
point yesterday in the name of
ex-Premier Patrice Lumumba.
The military regime of Col.
Joseph Mobutu in Leopoldville,
800 miles to the southwest, does
not exist for this city within a
jungle.
, Jittery officials of the p'rovin-
cial government are arrested daily.
Officers of the disorganized gar-
rison are beaten and thrown into
jail. The slightest suspicion of
pro-Mobutu sympathies can cause
this.
No one knows from day to day
who commands the troops or who
is in charge of the 11 local govern-
ment ministeries.
Alphonse Songolo, once Lumum-
ba's communications. minister but
later his detractor, is in the city
hospital going blind. He was
beaten for two hours by military
police, then left unattended for
four days.
"They are cruel and dangerous
children," says Slavomir Brzak of
Czechoslovakia, United Nations
civilian affairs officer he r e,
spreading his arms in dismay as
he talks of the Congolese.
"We cannot do anything without
being accused of interfering in
their internal affairs.
"We have no instructions to
deal with this situation," says Col.
/ Wolde Yohannes Shita, comman-
der of the Ethiopian Tekil Brigade.
Those troops, in theory, police
this city of 130,000 and all of vast
Oriental Province.

PLOTTING PERSISTS:
Anti-De Gaulle Riots
Dissolve in Algiers

ALGIERS (M--The violent anti-
de. Gaulle temper of right-wing
European settlers dissolved yes-
terday behind a facade of normal-
cy, but talk persisted of plotting
against the Paris regime.
Street sweepers and repairmen
removed most of the traces of the

Clearance

,To Pentagon,
WASHINGTON (JP) - Liaison
representatives of the incoming
Kennedy administration will be
cleared by the Pentagon for access
to the top secret information they
will need in preparing for transi-
tion of defense department con-
trol.
. Preparations for consultations
with and brieflings of the Kennedy
representatives by Secretary of
Defense Thomas S. Gates and his
aides were finished yesterday. Still
lacking was the name of the man
or men who would be sent by
Clark Clifford, chief liaison repre-
sentative for President-electJohn
F. Kennedy.
The sessions could be merely
broad administrative and budget
discussions with Gates and his
civilian aides or military opera-
tional officers such as the Joint
Chiefs of Staff could be called in.

Armistice Day rioting and the city
went back to work as usual.
The only traces of Friday's vi-
cious rock fights-which left an
estimated 100 injured - were a
score of boarded-up shop windows
and yellow stains oh the pave-
ments where tear gas grenades
had been thrown. Streets were
filled with shoppers and market
places had a new supply of to-
matoes, after losing most of them
to the rioters.
Speculation in some quarters
that the riots were the forerunner
of a serious test of strength
against President de Gaulle's gov-
ernment proved to be wrong-at
least for the moment.-,
General belief was that the riots
-mainly by teen-age students-
were an effort to sample the atti-
tude of law enforcement authori-
ties, perhaps as a prelude to a
more serious effort to reverse de
Gaulle's controversial Algerian
policy.
Many Europeans here profess to
feel de Gaulle is preparing a sell-
out to the nationalist rebels, who
have been fighting the French for
six years. s
Riot police, gendarmes and sol-
diers Friday made more of an
effort at containing the rioting
students than in putting them out
of action through charges and
mass arrests.
Study Road
Budget PVlais
WASHINGTON W-Democrats
at the Capital already are doing
spade work on one of the first
domestic problems the Kennedy
Administration will face-financ-
ing the national superhighway sys-
tem.
The problem comes to a head
with submission.to Congress early
in January, before the new Presi-
dent takes office, or two major
commerce department reports on
the 41,000-mile interstate roads
system.
Another key factor is the sched-
uled expiration next June 30 of a
one-cent a gallon gasoline tax in-
crease voted last year to keep
construction of the superhighway;
network from falling too far be-,
hind schedule.-
Staff members of the congres-
sional committees which handle,
road construction and financing
legislation will be prepared to help
the committee members go into
the problem early in the 1961 ses-
sion.
Democrats who put through the1
1956 act setting up 90 per centi
federal financing for the inter-1
state system are hopeful that the1
1961 review will come up with
permanent solutions for the trou-
bles plaguing the big road pro-
gram.
They would like to revive pros-,
pects for completion of the entire
41,000 miles by 1972 or as soon
thereafter as possible. This was
the goal of the 1956 law but it
is not now in sight.1

UN 18-Nation
Committee
Gives Report
Officials Make Plans
To Leave for Congo
UNITED NATIONS (A') -Dipol-
mats said yesterday some mem-
bers of the United Nations con-
ciliation commission for the Con-
go probably will talk with Con-
golese President Joseph Kasavubu
before going to -his turbulent
country.
They reported this after a pri-
vate meeting of Secretary General
Dag Hammarskjold's 18 - nation
Congo Advisory Committee.
The committee will meet again,
probably Monday night, to decide
when the commission will leave.
The diplomats said they expected
the commissioners will depart to-
ward the end of next week, per-
haps Friday.
One delegate said that before-
hand, three to five members of
the commission were likely to
meet on their own with Kasavubu,
now in New York seeking a U.N.
seat. Another stressed that this
would be outside the scope of the
commission's work.
In any case, the contact would
put commission members in touch
with one of the two leaders the
commission seeks to get together.
Another is Patrice Lumumba, the
man Kasavubu fired from the
premiership Sept. 5. Lumumba is
now a virtual prisoner in Leopold-
ville.
Some on the commission favor
Kasavubu, others Lumumba. But
all voted in the General Assembly
Wednesday to postpone debate on
seating a Congolese delegation
until the commission has visited
the Congo and reported back.
Ghana, a sponsor or a resolu-
tion to seat a delegation sent here
by Lumumba, won the postpone-
ment on a 48-30 vote.
A U.S. delegate said after the
committee voted that the United
States wanted the assembly to
take up the recommendation
quickly, perhaps early next week.
AF Launches
New Satellite
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE
BASE, Calif. (I')-Discoverer
XVII-first of a series of new
military spy satellites capable of
changing course if threatened--
rocketed into orbit yesterday.
After hours of confusion blamed
on insufficient radio data, the Air
Force announced the satellite was
whizzing around the earth once
every 96 minutes.
A spokesman said the eggshaped
orbit was nearly perfect, taking
the 2,100-pound satellite as far
as 615 miles from the earth and
bringing it back to 118 miles at
the closest point.
Late this afternoon it is to
drop a 300-pound capsule for re-
covery by air and-sea forces near
Hawaii. Contents of the satellite
and its capsule were not disclosed.
It is known, however, that future
satellites of this type called Agena
B have been designed to carry TV
cameras and send surveillance
films back to American territory.

Thanksgiving
CARDS and GIFTS
o Brundlage Gifts.
307 S. State NO 5-7921 j
*~ o o ~ t o c r c. ".-

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