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November 10, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-10

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THE WICHIGAN DAILY

engan

Chooses Dem
iial, Statewide

)crats

COALITION STRONG:
IGOP Gains Strength In Congress

In

Natio

NEW YORK:
Marchers'
Ask Action,
NEW YORK--Two hundred and
fifty persons demonstrated Tues-
day at both the Nixon and Ken-
nedy headquarters in Manhattan
to demand civil rights action in the
South.
The marchers chanted such
slogans as "Jim Crow Must Go!"

ELECTION DRAMA:
Nixon Concession Ends

Nightm-Lonp
NEW YORK (A - Forty-four
years ago, in 1916, Republican
Charles Evans Hughes went to
bed, apparently assured of elec-
tion as President of the United
States.
But while he' slept, Democrat

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SSuspense
Woodrow Wilson overcame his
electoral vote advantage by car-
rying the pivotal state of Cali-
fornia by only 4,000 votes.
An Associated- Press reporter,
who telephoned Hughes' hotel, was
told, "the President-Elect 'has re-
tired for the night and cannot be
disturbed."
Hughes Story
"Well," said the AP man, "when
the President-elect wakes up in
the morning, . tell him he isn't
President-Elect any more."
President-Elect John F. Ken-
nedy is a keen student of Ameri-
can history. He could hardly be
blamed if that bit of history
haunted him Tuesday and yes-
terday during the longest, closest
and most dramatic presidential
election in nearly half a century.
Yesterday, he and his wife re-
tired to their summer home at
Hyannis Port on Cape Cod to
await the election returns. A
continent away, Republican can-
didate Richard M. Nixon settled
down in a hotel suite in Los An-
geles for the same purpose.
First State
The first state to complete its
vote was Connecticut, which gave
its eight electoral votes to the
Democratic Senator from Massa-
chusetts. In Hyannis Port, rela-
tives reported Kennedy "jumped
with joy."
Massachusetts and South Caro-
lina joined Connecticut in the
Kennedy electoral column, and
Nixon carried his first state, Ver-
mont.
An hour later, Kennedy's pop-
ular vote topped 7 million and
his margin over Nixon reached
800,000. The Democratic candidate
seemed on his way.
But Florida fell to Nixon and so
did Virginia. And in Los Angeles,
the Vice-President was reported
"quietly confident."
Nixon--Speak

G T OP Takes,
Second Loss
In 24 Years
Eleven Republicans
Hold Congress Seats
DETROIT MA - Michigan has
decided for only the second time
in 24 years that it prefers a Demo-
crat in the White House.
And it also has named another
Democrat to take the over when
Gov. G. Mennen Williams steps
down from the statehouse office
he has accupied for six consecu-
tive two-year terms.
With returns virtually complete
from the state's 5,074 precincts,
Michigan gave Democrats a clean
sweep of all top state offices and
sent Sen. Patrick V. McNamara
back to Washington for another
six years.
Better Showing
McNamara made a better show-
ing than either Sen. John F. Ken-
nedy, the president-eect, or John
B. Swainson, the governor-elect.
Complete returns in the sen-
atorial race gave McNamara a
118,356-vote plurality over hig
Republican opponent, Rep. Alvin

Levels
MARGINAL:
Republicans
Hold State
Legislature
DETROIT (W) -- Republicans
surged back into control of both
houses of the Michigan Legisla-
ture today.
By thenarrowest margin pos-
sible, they regained House ma-
jority, 56-54, after battling
Democrats for two years in an
unprecedented 55-55 standoff.
Held Majority
They held to their top-heavy
22-12 majority in the Senate.
The GOP resurgence in the
House helped offset another Dem-
ocratic sweep of state offices.
The results may very well have
set the stage for more of the bit-
ter, inter-party wrangling that
has wracked state government for
years.
Got Seats
Republicans grabbed Demo-
crats House seats in Oakland and
Muskegon counties while Demo-
crats picked up one held by Rep.
Robert S. Gilbert (R) Saginaw,
who is retiring:
"This is certainly good news,"
said House Speaker Don R. Pears,
Buchanan Republican; who pre-
sided for two years over frequent-
ly stalemated sessions that pro-
duced legislation only with big-
partisan support.
Thus, the State of Michigan
finds itself in essentially the same
position as before the campaign.
The Legislature is still controlled
by the Republicans-this time by
a definite majofity. The state
House is still in the hands of the
Democrats, only this time their
popular-mandate was not quite so
decisive.

WASHINGTON C(m'} -President-v
Elect John F. Kennedy will have
a Congress of reduced Democrat-
ic majorities in which coalitions
of Republicans and Southern
Democrats may be a dominant
force on many issues.
The Republicans scored gains
in both the Senate and House in
Tuesday's congressional elections.
With the last Senate race set,-
tled in late returns, Democrats
were assured a 64-38 Senate ma-
jority in the 87th Congress which
convenes Jan. 3. This is down two
from the 66-34 margin they now
hold.
Score Gain
In races for House seats, how-
ever, Republicans already have
scored a net gain of 19, winning
167 while the Democrats won 256.
In still undecided contests Re-
publicans led Democratic" rivals
for 10 more seats, while Demo-
crats were ahead in four others.
The House lineup had been a
283-154 Democratic majority in
this now expiring 86th Congress.
Republican - Dixie Democratic
coalitions have been potent fac-
tors in deciding many an Issue of
the past, or at least forcing a
compromise to suite, their views.
These are loosely knit groups
teaming together when they feel
like it, going their own ways when
they don't, and sometimes not
unanimous in either choice.
Count Support
House Republicans figure that
on many issues they can count on
support of 80 or more Southern
members, to swing a .majority
vote. In the Senate, the Republi-
cans often have been able to
team up with 18 to 18 Southern
senators, and also swing; a ma-
jority.

As few as 140 House Republicans
teaming with 80 Southern Demo-
crats could command one more
than the 219-vote majority. In the
Senate 16 Southerners and 35 Re-
publicans could produce the 51-
vote majority needed in that 100-
member branch.
These teamups often involve
economic and civil ,rights legisla-
tion, and both/ are expected to
be issues in the 'coming Congress
session.
Returns from the elections set
Hoffa Attempt
Fails To oust
House Rivals
WASHINGTON ()-James R.
Hoffa, the Teamsters Union chief,
scored a spectacular flop in try-
ing to purge from Congress a
group of House members who ran
counter to his wishes on 1959 la-
bor legislation.
Out/ of 40 such House members
actively opposed by the leadership
of the vast Teamsters organiza-
tion only one has been defeated.
Thirty-nine were elected again
in Tuesday's balloting despite
Hoffa's opposition.
This was not Hoffa's greatest
blow in the Tuesday election, how-
ever. The election of Sen. John
F. Kennedy to the White House
apparently was a much bigger
cause of worry for him.
The Teamsters union chief ac-
tively campaigned against Ken-
nedy. He never, however, quite
urged Teamsters to vote for Vice-
President Richard M. Nixon.

some strange patterns, and pa
ticularly weakened the hands
the House Democratic forces wl
fly the liberal banner.
Twenty-five Democrats, me
of them in this category, we
denied re-election in the votir
while the Republicans in the rac
decided so far have lost three i
cumbenits.'
In the broad view, the pictu
looks much like the one t
President Dwight D. Eisenho
has, faced in the last two yeas
and mainly with the same k,
figures in Congress.
Big Three;
The big three of the Hou
Speaker. Sam Rayburn, D-Te:
the majority leader, Rep. Jol
W. McCormack, D-Mass., and t
Republican leader, Rep. Char
A. Halleck of Indiana, all we
re-elemcted.r
Seni. Lyndon B. Johnson,I
Tex., advances from the post
majority leader to the Vice Pret
deny, and thus will remain
the Capitol to preside at Sea
sessions. Sen. Mike Mansfield,:
Mont., assistant leader, is likely
inherit the leadership, and Se
Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois
retain the Republican ladershi
Both are holdovers whose sea
were not up in this year's votir
The major election upset, asi
from the big overturn of Hou
liberals, many of whom had wi
their ,seats in 1958 from usual
Republican areas, was the defe
of Sen. Allen J. Frear, Jr.,:
Del., in his campaign for a thi
term.
The Republicans picked up the
second Senate seat by electii
Rep. Keith Thomson to suc'cei
Sen. Joseph C. O'Mahoney,3
Wyo..

GOOD TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

t

GOOD T ICK E TS ST IL L AV AIL ABLE
for'
the brothers fou

CORRECTION
NOTICE

at

.. "
+o..

HERE'S A DUSTER in petal soft acetate tricot with a full sweep,
quilted back to back with quick drying acetate wadding, made in
eight gorgeous colors and looks extravagantly luxurious. The price
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In 38-44, colors are Melon, Electric Blue. $7.95.

The silence of the Nixon camp
was broken at 3:23 a.m. when the
GOP candidate conceded defeat-
but only if the current trend con-
tinued.
Kennedy went to bed without
any victory statement.
As Kennedy slept, Nixon cut in-
to his popular vote until the Dem-
ocratic margin slipped below one
million.
Kennedy arose in mid-morning
to find that his actual electoral
vote stood at 281, eight short of
the needed 269. Victory had elud-
ed him as he slept.
Then, at 12:33 p.m. EST, while
attention was focused on the
drama in Illinois and California,
Minnesota, almost forgotten, gave
its 11 electoral votes to the Dem-
ocrats. They boosted Sen. John
F. Kennedy's total to 272 and made
him President of the United
-States.

ON FOREST
off corner of
S.,University opposite
Campus Theatre
Parking at rear of store.

PATRICK V. McNAMARA
... second Senate termn
Bentley, Owosso multi-million-
are who has been described as the
richest man in Congress. Mc-
Namara polled 1,662,255 votes,
Bentley 1,543,899.
With three precincts unreported,
Kennedy held a 64,878-vote mar-
gin over Vice-President. Richard
M. Nixon, the Republican nominee,
for the state's 20 electorial votes.
Swainson topped Paul D. Bagwell,
former Michigan State University
speech professor, by 40,953.
Complete Sweep
To complete the Democratic
sweep of state offices, Michigan
elected T. John Lesinski Lieuten-
ant governor, and re-elected the
following: Secretary of State
James M. Hare, Attorney General
Paul L. Adams, State Treasurer
Sanford A. Brown and Auditor
General Otis M. Smith.
In the supposedly non-partisan
race for a spot on the supreme
court rbench, Justice Theodore
Sours beat Circuit Court Judge
James R. Breakley. Souris was
nominated by Democrats and
Breakey was the GOP choice.
Cong o Rebels
Waylay Patrol
ELISABETHVILLE (A'9 ---The
United Nations said yesterday a
patrol of 11 Irish soldiers was
ambushed and cut down by re-
bellious tribesmen in the Jungles
of northeastern Katanga prov-
ince Tuesday. A wounded man
and four bodies were found, while
the six missing men are believed
also to have been slaughtered.
The one known survivor, a ser-
iously hurt private, saved himself
by feigning death.
The patrol, including °a lieuten-
ant, was attacked near Niemba,
west of Albertville on Lake Tan-
ganyika.

The telephone number of
Irwin Dinn appeared in-
correctly in the Wolver-
ine Club Ohio State trip
ad. It should have read
NO 5-8367.

I[an

YOU MAY RECEIVE A LIFE-SIZED,
AUTOGRAPHED PORTRAIT OF
DleF.0oDUNLESS YOU ACT NOW!
Hurry! Rush out now and buy a pack of Luckies! Smoke
them quickly! Send the empty pack to Dr. Frood. If you
do it now-Frood guarantees not to send you this photo.

Hill Auditorium

ON, STAGE TONIGHT

SWIFT & COMPANY
ENGINEERING RESEARCH DEPARTMENT
and
RESEARCH LABORATORIES
Chicago, Illinois
will interview
ENGINEERS-Chemical, Electrical, Mechanical--B.S., M.S.
interested in a research career in such fields as
Process Planning, Instrumentation, Equipment Development
ORGANIC, BIO, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS (all degrees)
MATHEMATICIANS (Operations Research) M.S., Ph.D.
FOOD TECHNOLOGISTS-M.S., Ph.D.
who seek real opportunities to advance in their field.
A Swift representative will be on campus November 17 and 18
Arrange with your Placement Office to see
MR. NORMAN SWIFT

11

M'

s.a.c. Ciettea quild
*
Tonight and Friday at 7 and 9:25 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
A documentary program: HITCHCOCK'S
THE HUNTERS THE THIRTY-NINE STEPS

I

in

---~~U,;

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