100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1960 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TALE ALSO WINS:
elsey Romps in Playoffs, 20-0

Skating Rink Prepared
For Varsity, I- Use

The Michigan Union presents
football movies

By JOHN McREYNOLDS
Cleats' great value were shown
in yesterday's I-M residence hall
playoff games on the rain-soaked
Ferry and Wines Fields.
The Kelsey steamroller contin-
ued to flatten its opponents, this
time shutting out Hayden 20-0 to
remain unscored upon. Kelsey's
quarterback Bruce Baldwin passed
to Jim Ailer for the first score,
but the game was still in doubt
until Ailer intercepted a pass and
ran 25-yards for the touchdown.

Howard Schunaman capped Kel-
sey's scoring, snagging another
Baldwin toss in the end zone. -
Even Winchell's cheerleaders
and cheerers from Betsy Barbour
couldn't stop a Hinsdale attack
which left the "Big, Winch" on
the short end of a 14-0 shutout.
Quarterback Bob Schlecte's pass-
es connected with Gene Hanlan
and Ralph Plott for scores to put
Hinsdale against Kelsey in the
"A" residence hall championship
game.

MAN At I*$
by MIKE .GILLMAN

AN EVENT that was shaping up two months ago as a mighty blast
will come to pass Saturday, but as of today, it looks as if only a
gentle pop will be heard in the confines of huge Michigan Stadium.
The first meeting of the brothers Elliott received early billing as
one of the top football clashes of the 1960 season, but with only
mediocre seasons behind both coaches, only the fraternal interest
and the settling of a long-time Conference rivalry are at stake.
As the season opened, with brother Peter Elliott taking over the
reins of Illinois from long-time coach Ray Eliot, Illini faithful were
smacking their lips while Big Ten prognosticators were picking them
for the Conference crown.i
Michigan, with brother Bump Elliott in his second season at the
helm, was a Big Ten darkhorse. The easy opening win over the Oregon
Ducks marked the Wolverines as a team to be reckoned with in
Conference circles.
It didn't take long for the rosy picture to disappear. In the weeks
between, rugged Big Ten schedules had changed this Saturday's
meeting from a key battle in the Conference to a clash of also-rans.
Bump's boys dropped a hard-fought game to Michigan State,
25-17, but came back strong to whip the pride of the Atlantic Coast
Conference, Duke, 31-6. But since then, life hasn't been a bed of roses
for the Wolverines.
Now in the depths of a two-game losing streak, the cry of
Wolverine fans has changed from "wait till next weekend" to "wait
till next year." In the last three outings, Michigan edged punchless
Northwestern, 14-7, on a freak pass late in the game and dropped
hard-fought 10-0 and 16-13 decisions to Minnesota and Wisconsin.
Sure, all three losses on the Michigan record have been close
games, but there's an old saying-something about horseshoes, as I
recall.
THE ILLINI, after being favored for the title, have also fallen on
rugged days. Pete's charges have picked up a pair of wins and a
tie against outside rivals, but they've also picked up a few bumps and
bruises when they returned to their own league.
Against the only team both Michigan and Illinois have faced-
Minnesota-the Illini fell 21-10. The Wolverines lost, 10-0, to the
same team, indicating a toss-up Saturday-if that's any conso-,
lation to a pair of coaches whose hopes (and in Pete's situation,,
expectations) have been somewhat tempered.
At least Illinois got a boost in morale last weekend as it slipped
a 14-12 decision past the up-and-down Purdue Boilermakers. In
fact, in Illinois land, there was still talk about "mathematical
chances" for the title.
Hope springs eternal .. . I guess.
And so, with Michigan resting in seventh place in the Western
conference and Illinois a lofty fifth, local grid fans will be seeing one
of the best attended "nothing" games in the nation. Attendance
could touch 70,000, weather permitting.
The brothers have probably been worrying about each other's
teams all year, but it will all stop this week.
Early in the season when Bump was surrounded by happy players
in the locker room after the easy Duke win, he was told what the
Ohio State Buckeyes had done that day to brother Pete's Illini (34-7).
He winced.
This week he just might not mind a score like that, with nothing
at stake but the family rivalry. .'

In the second place "A" play-
offs, Strauss knocked Lloyd out of
the running 22-6, on the strength
of two touchdown passes from
Rudy Stomp to Larry Marawa
and a 60-yard kickoff return for
a third touchdown by Mike Sha-
bazian,
Scott Wins
Meanwhile Scott was routing'
cleatless Van Tyne 38-0. The Scott
point-making machine started im-
mediately at the start of the game
as Roger Schmidt let the kickoff
roll to a stop, then picked it up
to run 75 yards for a touchdown.
The machine hardly slowed down
during the whole game as quar-
terback Bill O'Reilly ran for two
scores and passed for the other
two.,
In the third-place playoffs,
Michigan stopped Huber 14-6 as
Morry Schectman passed to Bill
Isaacson for both scores, and
Cooley's powerful running game,
which' was stopped three times
within ten yards of the goal, be-
fore it scored, topped Wenley 8-6.
Oh, Those Interceptions
Michigan seemed a sure bet to
win a spot in the first-place "B',
playoffs as it Passed up -to Tay-
lor's one-yard line, but Taylor's
Jeff Ferries Intercepted a pass
two yards deep in his own end
zone and made a brilliant 82-
yard run for the touchdown to
win 6-0. Taylor will meet Kelsey,
which shut out Cooley 14-0, next;
week for the "B" championship
title.
Inother I-M "B" action yes-
terday, Adams shut out Chicago
28-0, and Alen-Rumsey overpow-
ered Hayden 14-0, to meet Adams
for the second-place "B" cham-
pionship. Gomberg topped Scott
In the last minute 8-6, Hinsdale
shutout Lloyd 20-0, Winchell beat
Wenley 12-0. and Williams inter-
cepted Strauss to death 30-0.

The "A" games scheduled for'
5:05 p.m. were postponed because
of rain until Thursday at 4:20.
These games will decide the
teams for the fourth and fifth
place playoffs in the "A" divi-.
sion and the fifth-place playoff
"B" teams.
Delta Sigma Phi 6, Phi Delta Phi 0
(torteit)
Law Club 5, Phi Chi 1
Phi Rho Sigma 6, Phi Delta Theta 0
(forfeit)
Alpha Chi Sigma 5, Phi Delta Epsi-
loft1
Delta Sigma Delta 4, Delta Theta
Phi 2
Nu Sigma Nu 6, Alpha Omega
G;iants Nm
Alvin Dark
SAN FRANCISCO M) -- Alvin
Dark, former field captain of the
Giants, yesterday was named the
new San Francisco baseball man-
ager and given a two-year con-
tract.
The 37-year-old National League
veteran, with no previous man-
agerial experience, succeeds Tom
Sheehan who took over from fired
Bill Rigney last June 18.
To get Dark, who finished the
1960 season with Milwaukee, the
Giants traded utility infielder An-
dre Rodgers to the Braves.
Dark played for the Giants from
1950 to 1955, and was the spark-
plug shortstop of the champion-
ship clubs of 1951 and 1954.
To the ex-captain goes the job
of rejuvenating a club that fin-
ished fifth this past season after
many tabbed it the pennant win-
ner in the pre-season forecasts.
The Giants were second When Rig-
ney was fired but wound up 16
games off the Pittsburgh Pirates'
pace.

It's coming to the time of year
again when the football season is
in its waning weeks and the win-
ter sports begin.
Last week the first ice was laid
on the Coliseum floor in prepara-
tion for the upcoming hockey sea-
son.
Besides the Michigan hockey
team, which will use the rink,
there is an I-M hockey league on
Need Managers.
Any sophomores Interested in
being hockey managers this
year are asked to call senior
manager Chuck Wreford at NO
3-2960, or contact him at the
Coliseum any afternoon this
week after 3:30 p.m.
campus composed of 10 student-
formed teams. This league is
unique among I-M sports in that
it is not announced by the I-M
department except in the official
I-M pamphlet.
The teams included this year
are Sigma Phi Epsilon, Delta Sgi-

ma Phi, Sigma Alpha Mu, Beta
Theta Pi, Cooley, Strauss, Allen
Rumsey, Zoology Faculty, Evans
Scholars, and Law Quad.
I Last year's champions and run-
ners-up,- Evans Scholars and the
Law Quad respectively, will each
head a division of five teams with
each team playing four games in
its division.
Any individuals interested in
playing can contact the ,manager
of any team.
The rink will also be open for
public skating during the follow-
ing hours: 3-5 p.m. Sunday; 8-10
p.m. Monday through Friday; and
10:30-12 on non-football Satur-
days.
"TOPS in COLLEGIATE
HAIR STYLING"
0 10 Hoircutters
* No Waiting
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre ,

WISCONSIN-MICHIGAN

game

3 R-S Union
Wednesday, Nov.

7:30 P.M.

U4
Engineers and scientists who have or
will achieve M.., Prof essional or Doctor's
degrees b January or June of 1961 are
invited to ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
with Mr. C. C. raVene, Staff Assistant
to Vice-President Engineering of the
DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY on

r

The

N

CALLIN

GKI D SELECTIONS{
Last week's Grid Picks were sprinkled with just enough upsets to
make a good score close to impossible. That is the usual story. Never-
theless, Bruce Berg picked 15 winners and came closest to the actual
score of the Michigan game and is this week's winner. This is the
second time in the last month that he won the two free tickets to
the Michigan Theatre.
Why don't you enter the Grid Picks contest this week? If you're
undecided about a particular game, call Bruce Berg-he'll probably
know.
C Entry blanks may be picked up at The Daily in the main office,
on the second floor and must be in by Friday midnight to be eligible.
They may be returned by hand or mailed to Grid Picks, The Michigan

SENIO
Like to get in on the ground floor and stay there?.
Sorry, we can't help you. But we do have lots of
room for first-rate seniors who want to get places
fast in the communications industry. Seniors with
a flair for science, engineering, business, account-
ing, management and personnel work.
You can find out how you fit into this business
in just one interview. See your Placement Coun-
selor now and arrange a visit with the Bell System
Recruiting Tearn. They'll be on campus to talk
with you on MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY
AMERICAN TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY
BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY
SANDIA CORPORATION

America's most exciting space and defense proj-
ects, including SATURN, SKYBOLT and
MISSILEER--and others of like importance-
have created outstanding long range opportuni-
ties at Douglas in the following fields:'

Electrical
Electronics
Mechanical
Chemical
Aeronaeitical
Metallurgical

Welding
Engineering Mechanics
Physics
Mathematics
Astronomy
Astro-Physics

Oct. 31, Nov. 1

Openings exist at Douglas locations in Santa
Monica and El Segundo, California and Char-
lotte, North Carolina.
If you are a U.S. citizen who will earn a
qualifying degree, please contact your place-
ment office for an appointment. If unable to do
so, write to Mr. C. C.:LaVene,
DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY, INC.
3000 Ocean Park Blvd., Santa Monica, Califomia

Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Here are this week's Grid Picks:
1. Illinois at MICHIGAN (score) 11.
2. Iowa at Minnesota 12.
3. Northwestern at Wisconsin 13.
4. Michigan State at Purdue 14.
5. Indiana at Ohio State 15.
6. Colorado at Missouri 16.
7. Nebraska at Kansas 17.
8. Syracuse vs Army 18,
9. Navy at Duke 19.
10. Harvard at Princeton 20.

Rice at Arkansas
Texas at Baylor
North Carolina at Clemson
Georgia at Florida
Oklahoma at Iowa State
Washington at Southern Cal
Tennessee at Georgia Tech
Pittsburgh at Notre Dame
N. Carolina St. at Wake Forest
Oregon St. at Washington St.

mite-have a CAMEL

THE DIVERSITY
F ELECTR IC.Command Control and
nformation Procasne

ACTIVITY AT HUGHES PRO-
VIDES AN IDEAL ENVIRON-
MENT FOR THE GRADUATING
ENGINEER OR PHYSICIST.
THESE ACTIVITIES INCLUDE:

" Polaris Guidance Development
" Army/Navy Computer Systems
i Space Ferry
" Fixed Array Antennas
" Fire Control Radar Systems
" Pulsed Doppler Radar and
Anti-Submarine Warfare
" Naval Tactical Display Systems
* 3-Dimensional Radar
" Air-to-Air Missiles
" Space Propulsion Systems
" Tunnel Diodes
" Infrared Devices
" Satellite Active Repeater
Development
" Wide Band Scanning Antenna
Feed Systems
" Microwave Antennas and
Radomes
" Guidance and Navigation
Computers
" Satellite Communication
Systems
a Satellite Reconnaissance Drone.
World-Wide Communications
Networks

ioriaonrrcesarng
Micro-Electronics
" Linear Accelerators
* Gamma Rays
i Nuclear Fission
. Remote Handling Devices
Photoconductive Materials
t Electroluminescence
s Solid State Display Devices
a Terminal Communications
Line-of-Sight UHF and
VHF Relay Systems
a Air Traffic Regulation and
Landing System
t Pincushion Radar
a Logi-Scale General Purpos.
Computer
a Radar Closed Loop Tester
* Missile-Range Ship
Instrumentation
" Precision Trajectory
Measurement System
Space Vehicle Subsystems
Telemetering Systems
" Radiation Sources, Detection,
Handling Equipment and
Effects Analysis
" Inertial Missile Guidance
Systems
Machine Tool Controls
i Microwave Tubes
Transistors and Diodes
Rectifiers
Thermal and Magnetic Relays
Crystal Filters
Digital Components and Device.
" Plasma Physics Research

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND PHYSICISTS
B.S., M.S. or Ph.D. (Mid-Year and June Graduates)
Members of our staff will conduct
CAMPUS INTERIVIEWS
Novermber 7 and 8
Find out more about the wide range of programs, unique

.d' N +.fir ..1 Y' " e -}r5":

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan