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October 29, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E

Appoint Heady, Zarafonetis

also ap-

medicine. Prof. Barker retired
from the Medical School faculty
in August after serving on it since
1925.

Other Appointments
Other appointments included
those of Professors Louis Land-
weber of the University of Iowa,
Ming L. Pei of the City College of
New York and George D. May of
the Georgia Institute of Tech-
nology to visiting professorships
in the engineering college.
Prof. Landweber will serve in
the marine engineering and nav-
al architecture department for
the year 1961-62 and Professors
May and Pei in the civil engineer-
ing department for this semes-
ter.
Prof. Eleanor M, King, dean of
the nursing college at the Univer-
sity of New Mexico, was named
assistant professor and an assist-
ant to the dean of the nursing
college.
Prof. King has served on the
PROF. FERREL HEADY faculties at both Wayne State
.to direct institute University and New Mexico.
SHERMAN SPEAKS:
Declares 'Perceptual Unity'
Basic Artistic Organization

I

I

fied in the psychological tendency
of the mind to "see" things as a
unity and to "group" objects when
seeing them, and the figure ground
relationship must be understood
to achieve dynamic asthetic or-
der, he said.
"We assume the whole, in as-
suming unity the eye seeks unity,
and we have to shift from the ac-
tual objective order to the asthet-
iC order. In great art, the ap-
parent position is congruent with
the actual position, he said.
Artist Makes Relationships
The artist is concerned with
making relationships. Vision pre-
sents a field of stress, a field of
complex lines. The artist must
make these lines relevant to each
other.
In a good design, a ground al-
ways yields to a figure. A good
example of this is symmetry. The
sides, or ground of a symmetri-
cal structure yield to the center.
"The mind has a tendency to
unify what it sees into groups.
Thus, unity of artistry may be ob-
tained by presenting an interre-
lated set of units. Different styles
of architecture have stressed' the
absense, implication, or presence
of the unifying lines." Baroque
and modern styles feature the
disrupted closure, allowing the
mind to close up the lines.
Whether any style is dynamic
or not, depends on the total unity
of the visual field. The dynamics
of color, however, are dependent
on the contrast rather than the
unity, he concluded.
I . }
Pass Resolution
On Potter's Death

SGC Seeks
Legislation
Information
By CYNTHIA NEU
Student Government Council
passed a motion Wednesday di-
recting the Education Committee
to communicate with various state
and national legislators to secure
information on proposed legisla-
tion concerning education..
The committee was directed to
contact committees on education,
the state Department -of Public
Instruction and the Office of Ed-
ucation of the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
Kay Warman, '61BAd., chair-
man of the SGC Education Com-
mittee, explained that at one
NSA conference, a member of the
Minnesota legislature had stated
that a bill providing funds to ed-
ucation has been defeated, be-
cause no person had written a let-
ter supporting t.
Miss Warman further stated,
"Students should be more aware
of what the legislature does con-
cerning them." -She pointed out
that not only do these issues need
support, "but any protest must be
made in advance-before it is too
late and the bill has been passed."
Since each individual student
cannot determine the details of
legislation in process, SGC can
better act as a liaison to gather
information and present it to the
student body, Miss Warman fur-
ther explained.
The motion provided for con-
tinuing communication with a
member or members of these com-
mittees, reports to be given to
the Council in reply, to the initial
letter, and also "When any new
legislation is first considered or
proposed, or there is any sugges-
tion from any of the representa-
tives that might effect the educa-
tional policies of the government."
The motion further stated that
"upon receipt of such reports,
SGC should carefully consider the
issue and whenever the Council
feels it appropriate, send a letter
of support or opposition to the
principles or proposals being con-
sidered to the appropriate mem-
bers of the government, and in-
form the student body of these
important educational issues.
Name Three
To New Posts
For Institute
The programs and functions
for the Willow Run Research
Laboratories were transferred to
the Institute of Science and
Technology and new IST officials
were named by the Regents
Thursday.
Robert L. Ohlsson, formerly an
assistant director at the Willow
Run Labs, was appointed an asso-
ciate director of IST and will be
responsible for coordinating des-
ignated research programs.
Wray Smith, who has been an
assistant director at Willow Run
Labs, was appointed an assistant
director and will have special re-
sponsibility for technical and ad-
ministrative activities in support
of IST research programs.
Prof. James T. Wilson, chair-
man of the geology department,
has been appointed an associate
director of IST on a half-time
basis and will have special re-
sponsibility for state-supported
research projects and other state-
wide programs.
Prof. Wilson will continue as
chairman of the geology depart-

ment until a successor can be
named, and then is expected to
continue his activities there on a
part-time basis.
JOSH WHITE
TONIGHT
Good Seats Available
At The Door
CIVIC
THEATRE
presents
BEVERLY EDDINS
BOB LOGAN
BARBARA SANDBERG
JOHN RAE
JERRY SHULL
in
JOHN VAN DRUTEN'S
HILARIOUS COMEDY
BELL,
BOOK,
ANDIf

-Daily-Henry Yee
COOPERATIVES-Geraldine Fowle, resident director of the Mark
VIII Cooperative, cooks In one of the eight co-ops on campus.
Students See. dvantages
In Cooperative Housing

By LORA KRAPOHL
,I joined co-ops to save mon-
ey," "I joined to get freedom from
dormitory rules and atmosphere,"
"I Joined because co-ops have so
tnany interesting international
students."
These are a few of the reasons
why over 250 students live in co-
ops on this campus today.
"Student co-ops were organized
to fulfill an economic need-now
over twenty-five years later, they
still meet this need. However, in
addition they provide places
where students can live together
in small houses and use them as
laboratories for their ideas,"
Luther Buchele, executive secre-
tary of Inter-Cooperative Council,
said.
Need to Get Away
"The need to get away from
family or supervisors and grow
up, or to put into practice class
room theories of leadership, is as
valuable to the student as shelter
and sustenance," Buchele added.
"On this campus, co-ops have
pioneered inter-racial living and
have always been active in the
civil rights movement. Members
of co-ops are in positions of lead-
ership throughout the campus,"
he added.
Among'the eight co-ops on this
campus, three are for men, four
are for women, and one is for
married couples. Although they
are listed as official University
housing, the co-ops are owned and
run by the ICC, a corporation set
up and run entirely by the stu-
dents who live or eat in the hous-
es.
Student Pays Less
"By living in a co-op the stu-
dent pays about $350 less than he
would to live in a dormitory. 've
known many to use the money they
save for a trip to Europe when
they graduate," Buchele said.
Any student beyond the fresh-
man year or over 21, can apply
for membership on the 'first come
first serve' basis. As a member he
is asked to share equal respon-
sibility for all decisions, such as
those on food, expenditures and
work.
Students can apply for both
room and board or just for meals.
Residents are supplied with fur-
nished rooms, social space and 20
meals a week,
All the work, such as cooking,
dishwashing, maintenance and
management is done by the mem-
bers, all of whom are expected
to work from four to six hours a
week.
Triangle Taps
New Members
From 'neath the heels of dusty
feet,
Within the vitals of the arch,
The great bronze seal called
loyal men
In the dead of night to march.
So came the men of Triangles.
Once more beneath the pointed
spires
New faces toiled with fears;
The seal of triangles again
shone bright;,
Cleansed with blood and fear.
So came:
Mervin:H. Roberts, Jr., '63E,
Richard R. Allen, '63E, John F.
Ulrich, '63E, Lewis T. Fenner,
'62E, James C. Tenney, '63E, and
George J. Quarderer, '62E.

"'Guffing,' the traditional be-
tween meal snacking, is available
to all members with milk, bread,
butter, jam and"leftovers free, and
other items charged at , cost,"
Buchele said."A member, know-
ing he will. be- late for a meal,
can have it saved for him until
he gets home,"
Each house sends one person
for every ten members to the ICC,
which functions as the landlord
by collecting rent, accepting mem-
bers, buying .houses, making ex-
pansion repairs, and giving finan-
cial supervision.
Co-ops at the University were
first established during the de-
pression years, when many stu-
dents had to lower the cost of
room and board in order to stay
in college.
By 1940, 15 Houses had been
organized, and the leaders of the
co-ops established the ICC as a
non-profit organization for the
purpose of buying houses suit-
able for co-op living and to co-
ordinate cooperative activity on
campus.

Board

L1

Statements
On Budgets
The Regents Thursday received
reports on budgets initiated since
Sept. 23, on construction project
progress and changed summer en-
gineering conference fees.
The funds for the total budget
allocation of $3,893,986.54 came
from the following sources: The
federal government, $3,125,895.57;
state and local governments, $83,-
929; industry and individuals,
$346,664.64; foundations, $219,-
799.81; endowment income, $88,-
122.52; service charges, $25,000,
and student fees, $4,575.
The budgets were largely made
up of research grants and con-
tracts-this group accounted for
$3,080,987.07 of the total. Instruc-
tional programs totaled $557,280.41
while student aid-fellowships,
scholarships and grants totaled
$230,719.06.
Vice-President in charge of
Business and Finance Wilbur K.
Pierpontreported on construction
projects.
He said the excavation is com-
pleted for the cyclotron labora-
tory's machine rooms and boiler,
and that work is about 38 per
cent complete on the West Medi-
cal Bldg. remodeling.
The Regents also adopted a new
schedule of fees for summer en-
gineering conferences. The revis-
ed payments range from $160 for
five-day conferences to $300 for
12-day meetings.
Lantern Night
Chooses Units
Twelve housing unit choruses
were selected to participate in
Lantern Night singing competition
at eliminations held last, night
at Hill Aud.
Adelia Cheever House; Alpha
Phi; Blagdon House, Markley;
Butler House, Markley; Jordan
Hall; Kappa Alpha Theta; Kappa
Kappa Gamma; Martha Cook
Residence; Mosher Hall; Pi Beta
Phi; Sigma Delta Tau; and Zeta
Tau Alpha will compete Nov. 7
at Hill Aud. for Lantern Night
awards.

U U

Ending Today
Continuous
From 1 P.M..

a

DIAL
NO 8-6416

.

"COMEDY SPIKED WITH FARCE.,. A MAXIMUM OF WIT::.
-N. Y. Tims
PETER SELLERS
ROBERT MORLEY
CONSTANCE CUMMINGS
k,. Thwb
"the Battle
Cost.e of the Sexes
COMING SUNDAY
"COME BACK, AFRICA"

m

equipment last Saturday. The Regents Thursday adopted
Faced with the principal's a memoir expressing their regrets
threat that scholastic football over the death of Prof. Richard
games would be prohibited if the L. Potter, of the biological chem-
guilty did not come forward, the istry department. Prof. Potter, a
team as a whole offered to send principal investigator of the bio-
a letter of apology to Minnesota logical effects of radiation for
and to attempt to recover the the Atomic Energy Commission,
stolen equipment, but did not had served on the faculty since
name the individuals guilty. 1950.
"STILL PLENTY OF CHOICE SEATS AVAILABLE-
ALL PERFORMANCES FOR TODAY AND SUNDAY.
HURRY! BUY THEM NOW."

& 8:00 P.M.

Gi em a quil
}M
Tonight and Sunday 7" and 94
The MAGNIFICENT
AMBE RSONS
with: JOSEPH COTTON
TIM HOLT
AGNES MOORHEAD
DOLORES COSTELLA BARRYMORE
SHORT: RENOIR (Color)
ARCHITECTURE AUDITOR IUM
50 Cents
p . 4

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*J o C..
~RA#4}
SNW N (LF/
b 1 CREVALIE

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