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October 26, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STATE AAUP MEETS:
Opposes Accreditation Move

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By ROBERT FARRELL
The Michigan Conference of the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors has passed a reso-
lution opposing the transfer of
high school accreditation from
the University to the state De-
partment of Public Instruction.
Prof. Sheridan W. Baker of
the English department, president
of the Conference for the past
academic year, said that an an-
nouncement of the AAUP's stand
was being sent to Lynn M. Bart-
lett, state superintendent of public
instruction.
At present all high-school ac-
creditation done by the state is
done by the Bureau of School
Services. If all goes as planned,
this duty will be transferred to the
state by next fall.
The AAUP opposition to the
plan is based on the idea that
practicing college faculty area the
best evaluators of college-prepara-
tory courses in the high schools,
Prof. Baker said.
Eliminate Evaluation
Bureau officials have said that
one of the major reasons for the
changeover was a desire to make
the bureau purely a service organ
for high schools and eliminate
any evaluation or "Judgment"
procedures which might detract
from its services.
Also mentioned as causes of the
change were the Russell Report
on higher education given the
state legislature and possible
friction among state colleges and
universities over the University's
being the one accreditation or-
ganization.
The recent AAUP meeting also
heard a report on the recently
proposed revisions in state teacher
certifications.
Prof. Baker said that the new
regulations were better than pre-
viously proposed changes in not
increasing the number of credits
high-school teachers must have
in education, in increasing the
emphasis on teacher training in
subject matter, and in alleviating
the "center of uneasiness and dis-
sension" which has surrounded
junor college instructor certifi-
cation.
Previously, Prof. Baker said,
Junior college instructors have
been certified under the same plan
and similar regulations as high-
school teachers, instead of a code
patterned after general college
faculty requirements.
Under the new plan, these re-
strictions, such as the requirement
of a certain number of hours of
education credit, would be elimin-
ated or improved upon, he noted.
Both these moves are illustra-

tive of .a new, tendency in the.
AAUP, Prof. Baker said.
From a previous concern pri-
marily with the freedoms and
rights of university faculty, Prof.
Baker saw the AAUP moving to-
ward "more active responsibility in
the total educational structure."
He said that professors had al-
ways ifluenced the educational
system to some extent, merely
through their power in the uni-
versities, the highest part of the
structure, and the AAUP was Just
making their concern more known.
Select Officers
The Conference also elected new
officers at its meeting.
The president this year will be
Prof. Ralph N. Miller of the Wes-
tern Michigan University English
department; the vice-president,
Prof. Ralph Lewis of the Michigan
State University biology depart-
ment; and the secretary-treasurer,
Prof. Wesley Dykstra of the Alma
College philosophy department.
University faculty members at-

1""

MASONIC AU D.-Detroit

Thurs., Oct. 27-8:20 P.M.

tending the meeting at Alma other
than Prof. Baker included literary
college Dean Roger W. Heyns,
who gave an address on "The Pro-
fessor and Higher Education,"
Prof. Ralph A. Loomis of the
engineering English department
and Prof. Albert H. Marckwardt
of the English department, direc-
tor of the English Language In-
stitute, Prof. Baker said.
Author To Talk
On Jew in Art
Maurice Samuel, American nov-
elist, will lecture on "The Image
of the Jew in Modern Literature"
at 4:15 p.m., today in Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
At 6:15 p.m., Samuel will give
an informal talk on "The Jew in
American Arts" in the Zwerdling-
Cohn chapel at the Hillel Foun-
dation.

r

in
to
res

Keep in Contact With Your Friends By Sending

I

S.

'. TORMENT AND
TEMPTATION
IN A SMALL
SOUTHERN
TOWN!

I

Prof. GeralrJ EFF
classical studies department and members wnwh was
professor of Greek and Latin, will the request of the students. Whn
discuss Sophicles' "Electra" today the proposal oas presented to the
at 7:30 p.m. in the Honors Lounge Residence Hall Board of Gover-
of the Undergraduate Library in nors it was turned down.
connection with the SGC reading Reform Report
and discussion program. The committee, however, re-
The meeting is open to the pub- formed -and made a new report
lic. to the board which was accepted
in the spring of 1959.
DIAL NO 2-6264 "There are a number of areas
.2on the campus, whether it be as
stated in the "Michigan House
Plan," or commonly assumed, falls
short of the theory," the commit-
tee report states.
The committee thought that
ENDS THURSDAY there was a lack of continuity of
programs within individual houses
over the years, that the houses
Brigitte Bardot were not truly four-year houses
but populated by freshman and
is a comediCennenow!sophomores and that the fresh-
man were not receiving the type
of peer counseling envisioned by
the "House Plan." They therefore
proposed separate houses for
freshmen.
Lists Problems
"Theoretically," Hale said, "hav-
ing freshman living together will
enable them to solve their mutual
problems which they do not share
j JACQUES CHARRIER 1
Eat.-COLOR
FRIDAY-"CAN-CAN"
Open Daily 11 A.M.-1 P.M.
On U.S 23 South Of Packard Rd.
DIAL
NO 8-6416 ยข - --
ARCE... A MAXIMUM OF.WI'. W e dar
-N..Tiu ; We areyot
PETER SELLERS at HYD
ROBERT MORLEY
CONSTANCE CUMMINGS
THURSDAY,
the Battle 3:00-5:00 P.M.
of the Sexes the Diog

The nobles atrs TT'fln
speeches by the century's most
popular presidents are avail-
able in the group's unique Tri-'
Fi process (which calls for two
loudspeakers to listen to, and
a third to be slung over one's
shoulder). Less noble quiet
spells are also included, in the
hope of appealing to popular
taste.
January 1 to 7 has been
named Silent Record Week; the
group is planning to pause
briefly in their creative labors,
and then grind out further
discs for the new year.
The pause, doubtless, will be]
a pregnant one.

Sit-In .Leader
St. John Dixon, expelled Ala-
bama sit-in leader, has been as-
sured that he will be able to en-
ter San Jose State College next
semester, announced the chairman
of the San Jose chapter of the
Congress of Racial Equality re-
cently.
Dixon has already been admit-
ted to the college as an extension
student and is taking courses in
sociology and economics.
Meanwhile aneinvestigation by
California Attorney General Stan-
ley Mosk Into the alleged "Gentle-
men's Agreement" that delayed
the admission of Dixon is contin-
uing. The investigation is based
on a charge made by Dr. John
Wahlquist, San Jose State Presi-
dent.

s"
s
14
t
t

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