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October 18, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICiIGAN DAILY

dar Lab Starts Moon Work

versity's radiation lab-
,hich does the largest
theoretical work on
i-sections in the coun-
engaged in many oth-
of maJor scientifici-
tigation of the mater-
sing the moon and its
is the laboratory's
at major project. The
V of this investigation
cover for the first time
imagnetic constant, or

speed of propagation of electro-
magnetic waves in the lunar sur-
face, of the moon's internal mat-
ter.
The laboratory also discovered
that the tectite particles were not
the basic matter in the moon.
The moon's internal matter was
tlso discovered to have a higher
electromagnetic constant than me-
teorites, which are the main
atmospheric matter.
The laboratory, under the di-
rection of Prof. Keeve M. Siegal of

.r

the engineering college, is one of
several research laboratories of
the electrical engineering depart-
ment.
"It actually began its -work in
1949 but wasn't called the radia-
tion laboratory until 1957," Prof.
Siegal said.
There are about 95 people work-
ing in the laboratory, 34 of whom
are students working for gradu-
ate degrees. The laboratory's four
locations are the main laboratory
at 201 Catherine, a laboratory at
912 North Main, the big experi-
mental laboratory in hanger 2 at
the Willow Run Airport and a
smaller experimental laboratory
on the first floor of the East
Engineering Building.
A major part of the laboratory's
work is research for the govern-
ment on radar cross-sections. A
radar cross-section is the ability
of a target to scatter electromag-
netic waves and depends on the
target's geometry and materials.
The laboratory also operates a'
physical-organic chemistry lab-
oratory which is designed to 'do
experimental work on radar-ab-
sorbing materials.,

THE BRA FT.T
COMEDYT HE
YEAR!"'.
EIR SRI
"HiLAR

IS .-IAN CARMICHAEL
I OUS!",-.IFE E

THE MICHIGAN MEN-The University Men's Glee Club will
sing again this year. Seventy-seven strong, they will answer Prof.
Dewey's baton in arrangements ranging from the "Fight Song"
to the classics Their season opens Nov. 4.
Glee Club Men Rehearse
for. Fall Season, Opener

v-aw,

NOW AT THE MICHIGAN

Read the

Classifieds

)PENING TOMORROW EVENING 8:00
:hristopher Fry's freedom award drama

HE

conce rt

reading

I.RSTBOR

The Michigan Men's glee club,'
with 33 new members, is in full
rehearsal for its first concert of
the season, Nov. 4 and 5.
This group, which won the inter-
national title in Wales the summer
of 1959, has international over-
tones in its own composition.
Members from Korea, England,
Germany and British Columbia
sing with the group.
Eleven states are represented in
the Club. They range from Con-
necticutt to Washington and from
New Hampshire to Tennessee. The
NROTCest
Deadline Set;
Any men interestedtin taking
the Navy College Aptitude Test
- the qualifying examination for
the regular Naval Reserve Officers,
Training Corps must submit ap-
plications by Nov. 18, the Navy
recruiting branch has announced..
Applications for the test, which
will be given Dec. 10, may be
obtained from theNavy recruiting
station. The NROTC program pays
all tuition, fees, books, in addition
to an annual retainer of $600, for
not more than four years.
Applir nts must pass a physlcal
examination, be at least 17 years
old, and rnot have reached the
age of 21 by July 1, 1961.

majority of the singers come from
the Michigan area, however.
In Rm. 3G in the Union, 77
members practice under the direc-
torship of Prof. Philip A. Duey,
of the Music School, each Thurs-
day night' and Sunday afternoon.
The Arbors, the quartet, and
the Friars, the octet, are prac-
ticing more than the required 3 '2
hours a week. The Arbors, com-
posed of former Friars Fred '61E
and Ed Farran '61Ed., Hal Rgnsom
'63 and Scott Herrick "61E, also
president of the Club, are polish-
ing their techniques.
The Friars, with five new mem-
bers, are busy working up new
routines. New Friars include
Steven Jones '64, Leonard Ficcinto
'63M, Roger Sergeant '62E, Webb
Comfort, Grad., and Ralph Helzer-
man '64. Brook Stanford '63, Vic-
tor Calcaterra '61 and David Ran-
dolph '62 make up the veteran
side of the group.
This spring the entire group
will tour the West Coast, but right
now they are just practicing for
their coming concert.
"It is noteworthy that out of a
Glee Club of this size, only five,
of our members are in Music
School, the bulk of the club being
comprised of students in the
literature'and engineering colleges.
"We represent the whole Univer-
sity," Terry Davidson '61, said.
Assembly To Hold
Party for Panhel

Editor Quits
As Protest
To Charges
In the face of charges that the
"Observation Post," a City Col
lege of New York undergraduate
news weekly, "is controlled by
Communist' - oriented students"
Warren Greenberg, a staff mem-
ber, resigned because he feared
what the implication of the state-
ment would mean to his career,
The charges were made by CCNY
Chancellor Buell Gallagher. He
further charged that news cover-
age was biased and in some cases
distorted.
The feud between the newspaper
and the president broke out when
the paper ran an editorial saying
Gallagher had called for "a re-
vival of the class struggle between
students andadministration along
classic Marxist lines." Gallagher
retorted, stating that the paper
was controlled by "students orien-
ted to the left,, towards the
American Communist Party,"
The editor of the paper, Peter
Steinberg, charged in an interview
that reports of himself or his
staff being Communist were "false
rumors and out-and-out lies."
NEBRASKA:
Fraternity
Disciplined
The University of 'Nebraska
Board of Regents recently sus-
pended the charter of Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternity until Sept. 1,
1961.
Dean of Students J. Phillip Col-
bert of Nebraska explained the
action which the Regents took.
Sigma Phi Epsilon along with
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Sigma
Nu fraternities were placed on
probation last May for holding an
unauthorized party in the nearby
town of Crete. Drinking at the
party (illegal in Nebraska until 21
years of age) led to various acts
of vandalism by several of the
fraternity members.
Consequently, the three frater-
nities had all rushing, pledging
and initiation privileges taken
away for this school year.
Colbert said that, on the first
day of the semester, Sigma Phi
Epsilon held a drinking party on
the third floor of its house, caused
a disturbance which led to the
party's detection.
The Board of Regents subse-
quently approved the suspension
of the charter.
Thieves Loot CarS
At Football Game
While two out-of-town specta-
tors attended the football game
Saturday, thieves looted their cars.
Both cars were parked In a lot
near the football stadium. The
thieves forced entry into them, and
absconded with $90 from one car.
Thirteen dollars and several packs
of cigarettes were taken from the
other. Local police are investigat-
ing.

lalf-time

MORT ON NIXON: "His chances look good, but what obdut ouys?"'
______________________

i------

MORT ON N IXON: "H is chances look good, but what about ours?"
An Evening With
MORT SAHL
and The Limelighters
Ann Arbor High School - October 26, 1960
TWO PERFORMANCES: 7:15 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
$1.75 $2.20 $3.00 $3.75 $4.40
SEND MAIL ORDERS TO: BETH ISRAEL CENTER
1429 Hill Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tickets also on sale at: FOLLETT'S
Indicate performance preference.
Please include self-addressed stomped envelope.

EXQUISITE EXHIBIT ON
Coonal ud~icca
Photostats of PICTURES and DOCUMENTS
showing the role of the Jew in Colonial Times.
BRASLEY LOUNGE-1429 Hill Street
October 14-November 12
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

"E

IU

/,

ATOMIC-AGE BANDSMAN-"Herkimer," a radio
robot and a recent addition to the Michigan Marc
made his debut at Saturday's game.

].00 - performances thrOugh

Saturday'

Lydia Mendelssohn theatre box office open
10-5 today, 10-8 Weonesday-Satu rdoy. Playbill season
tickets available: 8 productions - $6.00 or $4.00.

NOW

I

DIAL
8-6416

I

S'ALFRED HITCHCOCK'
NEWCRN
ISMiTMENT:

r,

DUNIVERSIT PLAYERS
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

WITH ANTHONY PERKINS - VERA MILES - JOHN GAVIN

wmowmw

Assembly Association will give
a tea from 3:15 to 5 p.m. this
afternoon in the Kalamazoo Rm.
of the Women's League.
The tea is sponsored by'mem-
bers of the Assembly executive
board for officers and committee
chairmen from Panhellenic Asso-
ciation.

Tomorrow at 8:30 P.M.'
Popular Actress: and Author
ILKA CHASE

I

HIE
IT H IT;S L

DIAL NO 2-6264
NDING WEDNESDAY

in a delightfully witty evening
of romantic lore
"The Dear Emotion"

I

will interview on campus

Tickets: $2.50, 2.00, 1.50
(30% Reduction on
all seats to students)

I1

Oct. 24 and 25

SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
Box Office Open Daily 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

B.S. and M.S. candidates
in Electrical Engineering,
Mechanical Engineering
and Physics for
Design and Development
Specialized. Training Program,
Direct Assignment,
Graduate Study Program

Thursday-"The Apartment" and "Separate Tables"

NO 3-1511, ext. 479'

Hill Auditorium

I C - III

9

ROMAN SLAVE SALE
PIPPY LUTZ JOHN ROSS
GAIL WINSKI JERRY LASKY
JADE MILLER T. FRANCIS
HEDY COHEN FRANK LEGACKI
(X ..MEREDITH EATON DICK HELZBERG
BEA NEMLAHA ARLENE ESPSTEIN

fl

$ee your placement officer now to arrange
an interview with the RCA representative.

wi~

A

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