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October 13, 1960 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

eCarus Describes Lebanese School

NEAR EAST:
Stowe Speaks on Communist Threat

String Grorm

Discussing the revolution, Prof.
McCarus said:
"Basically, the revolution was a
struggle for power among Leban-
ese. Chamoun was a strong presi-
dent, and although he never said
he wanted to succeed himself,
there were strong indications that
he did.
"He added embers to the fire
when he boldly accepted the
Eisenhower doctrine. The Leban-
ese government had declared it-
self neutral and agreed to favor
neither the east nor the west.
"They are dedicated to improv-
ing their country. Work on roads
has been nothing less than spec-
tacular, and there have been de-
cided advances made in agricul-
ture, industry and public works as
well."
Prof. MCCarus also found Beirut
"a truly cosmopolitan city where
you see all kinds of people and
dress."

He said that the educational
institutions, recreational facilities
and hospitals and drugs were
"first rate," noting that the city
seemed so Westernized to Arabs
that some did not consider it
truly Arab, although Westerners
thought it Oriental.
YR's Take Stand
On State Issues
The Young Republican Club re-
cently took a policy stand on var-
ious political issues in the state-
wide campaign.
The club's platform lent support
to a state-wide right-to-work law,
voting and drinking rights for
18-year-olds, the proposed one
percent increase on state sales
tax; but they opposed the use of
point systems in real estate trans-
actions.

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
"A showdown is fermenting in
Iraq; the current lull in Commu-
nist activity is deceptive and om-
inous, and an event could happen
there any day which would pro-
voke a world crisis," Prof. Leland
Stowe of the Journalism depart-
ment said yesterday.
In a talk on "The Communist
Threat in Iraq and Iran," the last
in a series of four lectures based
on recent research in the Near
East and Africa, Prof. Stowe
warned that the enormous stake
of the free world in Iraq and Iran
is jeopardized by the growing
Communist threat to the inde-
pendence of these countries.
The Iraqi government is cur-
rently headed by Col. Abdul Kas-
sim who overthrew the existing
regime in 1958 and has been in
power ever since.
Released Reds
As soon as his coup was ef-
fected, Kassim began releasing
known Communists from Jails in
Iraq and welcoming back into the
country expelled Communists who
had been trained in Russia and
the satellite nations and were'

ready to begin organizing Com-
munist uprisings within Iraq.
The Kremlin's goals in Iraq
are: To control the 255 million
barrels of oil produced there year-
ly, which Europe needs for its deh
they would like to establish a
Communist regime; and to set up
an infiltration center for all the
Middle.East.
Kassim, realizing that the acti-
vities of the Communists in his
country have gotten out of hand,
has taken some actions to check
them. By April 1960. he had ar-
rested some 400 Reds. He is en-
couraging a split in Iraqi Commu-,
nist groups, and he claims to
have dissolved the "Peace Parti-
sans," a Red incited group.-
But the Communists are still
strong in some ministries and
mass organizations. There have
been no real purges of. the Reds
and meanwhile, Prof. Stowe says,
"Kassim's eventual assassination
seems assured."
Alternative Control
Once Kassim is out of power,
the alternatives for control of Iraq

seem to be the Communists or
an Arab Nationalist army regime.
There is no dedicated, social-
minded leader in sight. "Iraq is
currently the most tempting place
for the Kremlin to, defy both theI
United Nations and the Western'
Powers. It is possible that the
Communists may be planning to
confront us with a 'fait accompli'
in Iraq as they did in Czecho-
slovakia in 1948," Prof: Stowe said
The Communists have ,been
massing p o t s and pressures.
against Iran ever since 1941. Int
1949, a Red attempt to assassi-
nate the Shah very nearly suc-
ceeded, and the Kremlin is cur-
rently engaged in what Prof.,
Stowe termed "scurrilous attacks
in radio broadcasts" against the
Shah, his regime, his member-
ship in the CENTO peace pact,,
and his alliance with the United
States which binds us to protect
Iran against any foreign aggres-
sion. '
Shah Stabilizing
The Shah is currently trying to
stabilize his nation's independence.
He is working for tax reforms,7
modern labor laws, and graft and;
narcotics controls.
Nevertheless, he must fight a
constant battle against corruption,
the extreme cynicism and lack of
patriotism of Iran's citizens, and
the extreme impatience of the new
and growing middle class in his
country.
"The Shah's life," Prof. Stowe
pointed out, "is always at stake.
He tends to underestimate the
strength and explosiveness of his
middle-class opposition and the
effect of Moscow radio propagan-
da. But there is always the pos-
sibility of an army coup.
"We must remember therefore,
that weface a constant threat
in both Iran and Iraq and it is of
the utmost importance that we
follow the developments there,
Mclosely and consistently," he said.

At Rackham
The Walden Quartet of the Uni-
versity of Illinois will present a
public concert at 8:30 p.m. tonight
in Rackham. Auditorium.
The program includes "Quartet
in B flat major, Op. 64, No. 3" by
Joseph Haydn, "First String Quar-
tet" (1951) by Elliott Carter and
"Quartet in G minor, Op. 10" by
Claude Debussy. Homer Schmitt
and Bernard Goodman will play
violins, John Garvey the viola, and
Robert Swenson the cello.
Sidney F. Giles, assistant Uni-
versity carillonneur, will give a
recital at 7:15 p.m. today.
The first half of the program
will be carillon compositions by
Den Gheyn,, Edward Loos, Kamiel
Lefervere and Staf Nees, the sec-
ond half will feature carillon ar-
rangements by Mozart, Schubert
and Beethoven.

'.

Music by the
RUEL KENYON ORCHESTRA

r"'

.wi
---

GRAND RIVER CORNER JOY
n EVU eA

SATURDAY * OCT. 22

I

U
I

Fri., Oct. 14

9-12 P.M.

VFW CLUB ... 314 E. Liberty
Admission $1 Per Person
Presented by Grad Student Council

lm N IC S 2 ShowsOnly s
PHONE: TExas 4-1810 8:00 P.M. * 10:15 P.M.
AN&RAY CONNIFF'S
"Concert in Stereo"
SEATS NOW ON SALE!
Grinnell's nd Riviera Box Office
Downtown Open Daily 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.
PRICES: Main Floor $4.30; Balc. $3.75, $3.20, $2.20 (Tax Encl.)

1

O.K.
So you have a date, and
you don't have much bread.
Look, for-only0c you can
hear Mike Seeger in a folk
music concert and for only
the same price as a movie
you can have a lot, better
time. Which is true.
UNION BALLROOM
Fri., Oct. 14-8:30
Tickets at Union
and Disc Shop

lodum ow

6m

11

r .,
Dumas' CAMILLE ,An American in Paris
(color)
Greta Garbo Robert Taylor GENE KELLY LESLIE CARON
Lionel Barrymore Henry Daniell OSCAR LEVANT
Lora Hope Crews Winner of 6 Academy Awards
Short: MYRA HESS also CARTOON
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM'
50 c ents

Union Lawyer
To Give Talk
On Civil Rights
Labor Union Counsel Arthur J.
Goldberg will speak at Challenge
at 3:15 p.m. today in Rackham
Aud. on the civil-rights of labor
union members.
Goldberg serves as SpecialCoun-
sel to the AFL-CIO; General
Counsel to the Industrial Union
Department, AFL-CIO; General
Counsel to the United Steelwork-
ers of America; and special coun-
sel to various other labor organi-
zations.
He is a member of the Ameri-
can, Illinois, and Chicago Bar As-
sociations; Director of the Na-
tional Legal Aid Association;
executive committee member of
the American Arbitration Asso-
ciation; and a member of the

DIAL NO S-6290
ENDS TONIGHT
NICOLOR O..WARNER BROS.
* Coming Friday *
"THE BRIGHTEST,
LIVElST COMFOY

I

I

THIS YEAR''vno
"IT'S A COMIC
MASTER-
SPIECE"
'M ALL RIGHT
PETER SRS

I'

11

I

DIAL NO 8-6416

ENDING SATURDAY
2 ALL-TIME GREATS

WINNER
0F
8 ACADEMY
AWARDS 1'

m iN/iv

AN ELlIAZAPRODUC MN
c-starring
KARL MALDEN " LEE I COOB
.a Rd SteIige a~t .1 nnie

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