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October 09, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY ____________________

Khrushchev

Hold s
Next

'For

Summit

Hope
Year

CONSTRUCTION, TEACHER PAY:
Nixon Backs Educational Aid

By G. K. HODENFIELD
Associated Press Education Reporter
WASHINGTON - Vice-Presi-
dent Richard M. Nixon has pro-
posed a program of federal aid to
education that goes beyond any-
thing that President Dwight D.
Eisenhower has advocated in re-
cent years.
On the thorny issue of using
federal funds to build classrooms
anad pay teachers' salaries, how-
ever, Nixon took a stand con-
siderable short of that of Sen.
John F. Kennedy ,his Democratic
opponent in the presidential cam-
paign.
In the third of a series of "posi-
tion papers," outlining his views

on various national issues, Nixon
said federal funds should be used
to help build new public schools,
and to help local school districts
pay off bonded debt already in-
curred for school construction. The
money thus freed, he said, could
be used to raise teachers' salaries.
States Proposals
The Vice-President called for:
A national scholarship program,
base on need and competitive exa-
minations. The program would be'
administered by the states, and
the states would share in the costs
'on the basis of "relative ability to
pay." The scholarships "can be
as large as $1,000 a year," Nixon
said.

Extension and expansion of the
college student loan program,
which is scheduled to expire next
June 30. Also, a change in this
program so that up to 50 per
cent of the loans may be "for-
given" to students who later teach
in colleges an universities. The
forgiveness clause now applies
only to those who go into teaching
in public elementary and second-
ary schools.
Dormitory Aid
A continued federal program of
low-cost loans to colleges and
universities for dormitory con-
struction, "greatly expanded into
a program of both loans and
matching grants for classrooms
and laboratories and libraries as
'well."
A "substantial increase" in the
number of graduate fellowships
that can be granted annually un-
der the National Defense Edu-
cation Act.
Federal grants for research and
development of such teaching aids
as closed circuit television, for the
purchase of technical equipment,
for setting up guidance and coun-
seling services, and "for teaching
more students, and teaching them
better."
A distinct Nixon break with the
Eisenhower position was the pro-
posal that the college loan pro-
gram for dormitory construction
be continued and expanded.
The President has urged that
the program be abolished, and
replaced with direct grants to the
colleges. These grants would be
used to cover the difference in
interest costs between government
and private loans.
Loan Program
The loan program has averaged
about $50 million a year, all of it
repayable. The Eisenhower pro-
posal would cost -the government
about $25 million a year.
Without going into detail, Nixon
also proposed to ease the burden
on parents with children in col-
lege.
"I believe," he said, that the
next time Congress acts on tax
reform legislation it should con-
sider extending tax credits or de-
ductions to cover tuition and other
Costs for higher education."

Limitations
By Aspirants
Says Soviet Position
Not Formed by UN
GLEN COVE, N.Y. VP)-Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev last
night held forth the prospect of a
summit meeting with the next
American President despite pre-
conditions already set during the
current campaign by both presi-
dential aspirants.
Khrushchev likened the cam-
paign speeches by both Vice-Presi-
dent Richard M. Nixon and Sen.
John F. Kennedy to mere words
to be tossed into a garbage pail
once the election is over.
Khrushchev also said, in com-
menting on the United Nations
refusal yesterday to discuss the
issue of membership for the Red
China regime, that Russia's world
position is determined not by UN
votes but "by the economy of the
Soviet Union."
U.S. Refusals
President Dwight D. Eisenhower,
whom Khrushchev has refused to
meet with except under conditions
unacceptable to White House, and
Nixon and Kennedy have declared
they will not confer with the
Soviet chief unless advance nego-
tiations at the diplomatic level
show prospects of a fruitful meet-
ing.
In indicating that he expects to
be able to meet with the next
American president regardless of
campaign preconditions being set
by both Nixon and Kennedy,
Khrushchev saidhe was accepting
an unidentified American's advice
that campaign talk by American
politicians is something to be
dsregarded.
Not Interested
The Russian Premier said he did
not tune in on Friday night's
Nixon-Kennedy television debate
because "I am interested in better
spectaculars than that.
Khrushchev tossed out his de-
fiance of UN votes when newsmen
asked him about yesterday's Gen-
eral Assembly vote of 42-34 to
shelve for the 10th straight year
the question of admitting Red
China to the world organization.

WANTED: All egg-heads, round heads, square
beatniks, neatniks, folkniks, frat-feeders, Greek
mothers. Everyone for

heads, block heads,
gals, G D I's, Zen

An Evening With
MORT SAHL
and The Limelighters
Ann Arbor High School -October 26, 1960
TWO PERFORMANCES: .7:15 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
$1.75 $2.20 $3.00 $3.75 $4.40
SEND MAIL ORDERS TO: BETH ISRAEL CENTER
1429 Hill Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tickets also on sale at: FOLLETT'S
Indicate performance preference.
Please include self-addressed stamped envelope.
S.G.C.
TONIGHT at 7 and 9
THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC
directed by CARL DREYER
with MARIA CAVALCANTI
"No. 4 of the Best 12 Films of All Time"-Brussels,
1958 poll of the 117 film historians from 26 nations
Also:
THE LADY FROM PHILADELPHIA
with MARIAN ANDERSON
ARCH ITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 Cents

Chiang's
Opponent
Sentenced
TAIPEI, Formosa (P)-Lei Chen,
organizer of the first major politi-
cal opposition to Chiang Ka-
Shek'slong rule of Nationalist
China, was convicted of sedition
yesterday and sentenced to a total
of 10 years in prison.
A five-man military court found
Lei-64-year-old leader of the em-
bryonic China Democratic Party-
guilty of charges of attempting
to incide riots and rebellion on
Formosa and of harboring an al-
leged Communist spy.
Two associates on a fortnighty
magazine published by Lei, "Free
China," also were convicted of
sedition.
The alleged spy, Liu Tzu-Ying,'
an accountant for the magazine,
was sentenced to 12 years' im-
prisonment and a loss of civil
rights for eight years. Business
Manager Ma Chih-Su received a
five-year prison term and was
ordered deprived of his civil rights
for four years.
Official Nationalist Chinese
quarters had no immediate com-
ment on the verdicts, but general
opinion outside official quarters
was that the sentences were much
more severe than had been ex-
pected. Many felt that Lei, whose
arrest touched off criticism here
and abroad, would get off with a
suspended sentence.
The outcome served to empha-
size statements by Nationalist Chi-
nese leaders that there would be
no interference with what they
called legitimate political activi-
ties, but that no mercy would be
shown anyone found guilty of
sedition.
South Africa
Awaits Election
Of President
JOHANNESBURG () - South
Africans turned yesterday to the
question of who will be their first
president after final returns
showed the country had voted to
become a republic.
The South African Press Associ-
ation said the complete vote in
Wednesday's all-white referendum
gave a 73,680 majority-849,598
votes to 775,978-to the pro-re-
public forces of nationalist Prime
Minister Hendrick Verwoerd.
The republic is expected to be
procliamed early next year after
Verwoerd presents to the nation-
alist-dominated Parliament legis-
lation making a president the
chief of state instead of Britain's
Queen Elizabeth II.
Verwoerd has declared he would
lead a delegation to the annual
conference of British Common-
wealth prime ministers to try to
keep South Africa in the British
family of nations.
Set Polaris Tests
At Canaveral Soon
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (P) -
The nuclear submarine Patrick
Henry, a hard-luck loser its first
trip here, returned yesterday for
a crucial series of launchings aim-
ed at making the Polaris missile
operational within a few weeks.
The 380-foot undersea dread-
naught cruised into nearby Port
Canaveral and began preparations
for the vital shots. Success will
mean that by sometime in No-

vember the United States will
have one of the most powerful
and mobile war deterrent systems
ever devised.
The exact number of launchings
from the Patrick Henry will de-
pend on the degree of success.

IN PERSON

4

AFRICAN PROBLEM:
Unrest Strikes Four Nations

By The Associated Press
Unrest spread thrtugh four Af-
rican nations yesterday, forcing
whites to take refuge and killing
Negroes.
In the Katanga, white residents
took refuge in the two UN-pro-
tected hotels ofthecotton grow-
ing center of Kabalo as Baluba
tribesmen intensified their rebel-
lion against the government.
Tribal rebels have been moving
in and around. Kabalo-some 400
miles north of Elisabethville-and
at one stage they occupied the
airfield and a big cotton mill
outside of town, a government
spokesman said.
(The Baluba upsurge against
Premier Moise Tshombe's govern-
ment in north and central Ka-
tanga was reported by Brussels
Radio Friday in a report which
said 40 tribesmen had been kill-
ed in a single clash.)
In Southern Rhodesia, police
opened fire on African rioters in
the non-white township of Ha-
rare outside Salisbury. They re-
ported six Negroes were killed and
dozens injured.
Riots broke out after a white

3 Days Until

SHELLEY
BERMAN
with the
CUMBERLAND THREE
WED., OCT. 12
8:30 P.M.
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Tickets $4.50-3.50-
2.75-2.25-1.75
(tax inci. )
On Sale At
THE DISC SHOP &
THE MUSIC CENTER

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