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October 04, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

J.S. Revokes California Students' Visas

Plan Reception at Union
For Kennedy's Sister

Poet Questions Modern Trends

after the demonstrations and sub-
sequently had their visas in this
country revoked; this was done
in spite of the fact that charges
against them, and other students
who had been arrested at the
time, were dismissed by judicial
authorities.
Cecil Fullilove, deputy director
of the San Francisco Immigration
Office, said that under the Immi-
gration and Naturalization Act of
1952, the Immigration office can
determine whether a foreign stu-

I

dent "engages in any activity in-
consistent with his role as a non-
immigrant."
* * *
Baton Rouge, La.-Students en-
gaged in active political campaign-
ing on the campus of Louisiana
State University for their favor-
ite presidential candidates were
told to discontinue their activities.
President of the University Troy
H. Middleton and Dean of Men
Arden O. French pointed out that
the interest of the student body
was "commendable" but that poli-
tical campaigning had not been
permitted on the LSU campus for
some time.
The authorities made it clear
that they were not discouraging
student interest in politics since
"forums, debates, etc., as spon-
sored by recognized student or-
ganizations," were in order. But
it was explained that campaigning
and politicking for state and na-
tional elections could get out of
control, and thus take away from
the prime purpose of the univer-
sity, which is to educate students.

Senator John F. Kennedy's
campaign for the Presidency will
be brought to the University to-
day at a 4 p.m. reception for Mrs.'
Peter Lawford, sister of the Dem-
ocratic candidate, in the Michi-
gan Union Ballroom.
The reception, hosted by Gov-
ernor and Mrs. G. Mennen Wil-
liams, will be attended by local
Democratic candidates, and prob-
ably Senators Patrick M. McNa-
mara and Philip A. Hart. Students
and local residents are invited to
attend.
Williams will also speak to res-
idents of Winchell House in West
Quadrangle at 5:35 p.m. concern-
ing the campaign.
The National Chairman of Citi-
zens for Kennedy, Byron "Whiz-
zer" White, will speak at the Uni-
versity after meetings with Demo-
crats today in Grand Rapids, Bat-
tle Creek, and Ann Arbor. White
is slated to talk at Gomberg
House, South Qaud, at 8. White
is a former "All-American" from
Colorado University and Detroit
Lions football player.

By RUTH EVENHUIS
Prof. John Heath-Stubbs of the
English department termed him-
self "puzzled" by this decade's
trend away from the difficult and
obscure poetry particularly char-
acteristic of the 1920's and 1930's.
Leading a discussion on con-
temporary poetry at the Student
Government Council sponsored
reading and discussion seminar
Sunday night, Heath-Stubbs bas-
ed his talk on the Anthology
"Young Poets of England and
America." The book, edited by
Donald Hall, Robert Pack . and
Louis Simpson, contains a selec-
tion by Heath-Stubbs himself.
"That era's poetry," he said,
"can be defended on the grounds
that if it is to be expressive of
a highly complex historical and
cultural situation, it must be dif-
ficult and obscure.
"Accepting this defense," he
explained, " one must conclude
that the contributors to this an-
thology are shirking their job, and
taking the easy way out."
"Intellectual Perversity"
A second point of view might
terminate the more difficult poetry
of those decades a "red herring"
or "sheer intellectual perversity."
He offered as a third, and
kinder, alternative the conjecture
that the "modern" poets are find-
ing the complexities of the post
atomic age impossible to cope with,
and for this reason, are limiting
themselves to the still meaningful

realm of personal experience, hop-
ing "to keep alive a little hearth
of feeling about the commonplace,
everyday life which they ,have to
live".
He called attention to the pre-
ponderance of domestic poems in-
cluded in the anthology.
Absorb Restraint
These poets have absorbed emo-
tional restraint and intellectual
honesty from a background of
intellectual and experimental po-
etry. Poetry today, according to
him, is regular in form and reliant
on ordinary, intelligent speech.
He explained that he is "sym-
pathetic" to the "beat" poetry of
men like Ginsburg and Ferling-
hetti. But although he praised the
vitality and "dynamism" of that
verse, he criticized its exponents

as men who haven't learned their
craft well.
He explained that they are using
the language irresponsibly, and
hence, dishonestly. A welcome
synthesis of the "beat" verse and
the more carefully constructed
poetry represented in the an-
thology might occur "in the emer-
gence of a genius", he said.
Although he doesn't think the
"beat" poets of this generation
are willing to synthesize dyna-
mism with technical control, he
looks for better work from their
successors.
In defense of poetic complexity,
he observed that "when such verse
finally communicates to the
reader, it does so forcibly, and
expresses in poetry things beyond
the scope of a "nice little essay".

4

r

Tickets available
Tomorrow at
Follett's & Ulrich's

I

I

MORT ON HOLODAYS: "The new holiday s Beat Wednesday, in
which all the people in coffee houses go to work for one day."
An Evening With
MO.RT SAHL'
and The Limelighters
Ann Arbor High School -October 26, 1960

I

MRS. PETER LAWFORD
...Visits University

I'

ENDING DIAL
TONIGHT NO 8-6416
Not since"LIIABOLIQUE"and"WAGES OFFEAR"
bas there been such NERVE-SHATTERING
SUSPENSE!
CURT
JUR GENS
....Diabolical SUSPENSEI

Wednesday:

HELMUT KAUTNER'S I
yIZt-WtINNING trs

I

Are YOU confused about Political Questions?
To clear up the confusion
Hear ERIC HASS
Presidential candidate of the
Socialist Labor Party
Public Lecture to be followed by question period.
8:00 P.M. Tomorrow evening, October 5
AUDITORIUM, ANGELL SCHOOL
1608 S. University Avenue

I

14r_-_
Even though modern electronic computers work at al- pause midway in the problem and tackle a more im*
most unbelievable speeds, the scientist is way ahead portant one.
of them Creating-such tools and putting them to work for sci-
Put quite simply, scientists have been thinking up com- ence-or for business, industry, or government-is ex-
plex problems faster than even the fastest computers citing, important work. It calls for talents and skills of
could handle them. To close this gap, IBM created every kind, from liberal arts to Boolean algebra to astro-
STRETCH, the world's fastest, most powerful computer. physics.
The first STRETCH system will go to the AEC at Los So whatever your particular talents and skills, there
Alamos to aid in nuclear reactor design. This goliath can may be just the kind of job at IBM you've always wanted.
do a million additions or subtractions a second. It can The IBM representative will be visiting your campus this
"read" the equivalent of four million characters per year. Why not ask him about it? Your placement office
minute from magnetic tape. It can print the equivalent can make an appointment. For further information about
of three good-sized novels every hour. It can perform opportunities at IBM, write, outlining your background
all these operations simultaneously, and if necessary and interests, to:
Manager of Technical Employment
IBM will interview on IBM Corporation, Dept. 887
Nov. 16 and 17. 590 Madison Avenue
New York 22, New York.

Form Group
For Bursley
A "Students for Bursley" Com-
mittee has been organized on cam-
pus to boost the candidacy of
Gilbert Bursley, a member of the
University Development Council,
for election as Republican repre-
sentative to the State Legislature,
first district Washtenaw County.
The organizational meeting held
last Sunday elected the following
officers: Marshall Keltz, '61, chair-
man; Herbert Friedman, '64, vice-
chairman; Margaret Agren, '62,
secretary; William Ellis, '64, treas-
urer; Thomas Connellan, 64, pub-
licity chairman; Lewis Sequin, '64,
Issues Chairman: Bruce Hankins,
,64, campaign manager.
.A spokesman said the group will
discuss and investigate voters'-re-
actions to state issues and to cam-
paign actively for Bursley.
The next meeting will be held
at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16, at
Bursley's residence, 2065 Geddes
Street.
Stowe To Present
African Lectures
Prof. Leland Stowe of the jour-
nalism department will present a
two-part lecture at 4:15 p.m. to-
day and tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Stowe will talk on the research
he has done recently in the Middle
East and North Africa for "Read-
er's Digest."
CARLOS
MONTOYA
Ann Arbor High
Fri. Oct. 7
830P.M.
L NO 5-6290
Note Time
Schedule sE
EWR WIR
wm
EAN~iou!
JAUbSIMONS
to SInclAiR Uwin
[ELMERGRN!YJ
Shows at 1:00-3:30-6:15-8:50
Features at 1:08-3:40-6:25-9:00

TWO PERFORMANCES:
$1.75 $2.20

SEND MAIL ORDERS TO: BETH ISRAEL CENTER
1429 Hill Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tickets also on sale at: FOLLETT'S
Indicate performance preference.
Please include self-addressed stamped envelope.

ISA Students
Tour Village,
Relive History
Saris, cameras, and smiles high-
lighted the group of 68 students
from the international Center
last Saturday, as three buses sped
them toward Greenfield Village.
Walking into the village, toward
a printing shop dating from the
1860's, conversations ranged from
politics to classes, from religion
to a man trying to make a date
with the girl behind him.
Thevisitors from over 30 na-
tions saw the old Ford home, the
Wright brothers' shop,civil war
slave huts, a gaily painted steam-
boat, and the remodeled workshop
where Ford built his first car.
The background was replete
with the chugging of model-T
cars, the whoo-whoo of the steam-
boat, and the banging of a shoot-
ing contest.
As *the group drifted over to-
ward all the commotion, they saw
what appeared to be Union sol-
diers, pioneer', frontierswomen, a
British Redcoat and colonial gen-
tlemen in a muzzle-loading rifle
contest. During intermission the
illusion was shattered, when the
costumes were judged.
In other pauses between the
rounds of shooting, an Indian!
group in full feather performed
tribal dances and chants.
"I have the feeling that this w"as
set up by a man who was only;
trying to prove America has a his-
tory. It reminds me of a house
in Ireland." These and many more!
comments filled the-air as the
students boarded the buses for
Ann Arbor.
MSU Students
Fined by City
Two Michigan State University
students, William Kestly and
Charles Rinkevich, were fined
$15.00 each and released today at
Ann Arbor Municipal Court after
pleading guilty to a charge of dis-
orderly conduct.
The students were originally
picked up in connection with the
defacing of University property,
while attempting to hitchhike
back to East Lansing.
Group to Discuss
A merican Liberties
The Student Government Coun-
cil's reading and discussion semi-
nar on "American Civil Liberties"
will be held at 4:15 today in the
Honors Lounge of the Under-
graduate Library.
Prof. Joseph Kallenbach of the
political science department will
act as discussion leader for the
group, whose topic was chosen to
tie in with the Challenge program.

Mondays
6 P.M.

Wednesdays'
6 P.M.

COMMENCING WED., OCT. 5,
RESERVATIONS MUST BE MADE AND
PAID IN ADVANCE FOR 4 WEEKS
Rates for affiliated HILLEL members for 4 wks.: $20
Rates for others ......................... $24
Full details available at Hillel office weekdays
and Sundays and evenings after 7.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
. Announces
MIDWEEK DINNERS

DIAL NO 2-6264

*1

I * ENDING TODAY

* i

Fridays
5:30 P.M.

°

.7:15 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
$3.00 $3.75 $4.40

STARTS WEDNESDAY
THE AOON IS CAPTURED! THE EARTH IS NEXT!.
COLUMBIA PICTURESpressn s
vtRYOIKEBE"KYOKOANZAI
tODNARD STANSRO
tAROWDcONWAY GEORGEWHYMAt
EsE RICHTER

4

TI

1r

I

HOW TO SQUEEZE
A MILLION CALCULATIONS
INTO ONE SECOND

SPONSORSHIP
Petitions for all registered stu-
dent organizations are avail-
able in SAB. They must be re-
turned by 5:00 p.m., Friday,

October 7.

I

L

MICHIGAN-MICHIGAN STATE
MOVIES of Saturday's Game
Watch Fitzgerald's 99-yard
p; vskick-off return

l. '
.r,
, "/ ..

I

.

Ir'. f f . 3Y/Z"AT4 "9l

N °'w N_

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