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October 01, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-01

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THE MICHiGAN DAILY

Neutral Natio

ns Demand
Coriference

New

Summit

-AP Wirephoto
VIP LUNCHEON-Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev says goodbye to his luncheon guests,
Yugoslavian President Tito (right) and President Gamal Nasser of the United Arab Republic
(center). The luncheon for Communist and neutralist heads of state in New York for the United
Nations meeting was held at the Soviet UN mission's headquarters on Park Avenue,
'MISSTATEMENTS' CHARGED:
Nixon, Kennedy, Trade Blows

Nehru
UN Support
Of Meeting
Sukarno Leading
Call for Conference
UNITED NATIONS (-) - Five
neutralist nations demanded yes-
terday that President Dwight D.
Eisenhower and Soviet Premier
Nikita S. Khrushchev meet in a
new summit as a "first urgent
step" toward world peace.
The proposal quickly went on
the United Nations General As-
sembly agenda without objection.
The development, in the wake
of a concerted Khrushchev drive
for Asian-African support, aroused
Western concern that the United
States has been pushed into a
tight spot.
Sukarno Proposal
The neutralist proposal was pre-
sented by President Sukarno of
Indonesia at the conclusion of a
policy speech to the Assembly.
Dramatically lending his great
prestige to the undertaking, Prime
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru of In-
dia quickly asked the Assembly to
place it on the 15th session's
agenda. Without discussion, the
proposal automatically was added
to the weighty matters to be dis-
cussed by the assembled repre-
sentatives of the 98 nations.
It was considered likely that
debate on the demand for a new
Eisenhower - Khrushchev meeting
would take place early next week.
First Appearance
It was the first appearance on
the rostrum for this session for
Nehru, who has been occupying a
leading role among the so-called
neutrals in attempting to force a
new summit in the face of for-
midable obstacles.
Just before the neutralist Indo-
nesian offered the draft resolution
for Assembly action, Khrushchev
surrounded himself with an array
of African and Asian leaders at a
glittering Soviet UN headquarters
luncheon. The whole Communist
bloc, including a parade of Soviet

WASHINGTON:
Macmil1lan,
President
To Confer
WASHINGTON (A') - British
Prime Minister Harold Macmillan
is scheduled to fly here from New
York today to talk with President
Dwight D. Eisenhower about the
East-West crisis in the United
Nations.
One of the principal problems
before the two Western leaders
when they meet at the White
House tomorrow morning undoubt-
edly will be the heavy neutralist
pressure developing in the UN
General Assembly for a face-to-
face meeting between Eisenhower
and Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev.
White House Press Secretary
James C. Hagerty announced the
meeting between Eisenhower and
Macmillan, together with Prime
Minister Robert G. Menzies of
Australia. Hagerty said Eisenhower
has wanted to have a talk with
Menzies, and it was decided this
could be combined with the session
with Macmillan.
Hagerty's announcement was
made at Denver, where Eisenhower
yesterday attended funeral services
for Mrs. Eisenhower's mother.

Farewell Given to Twinin

WASHINGTON (RP) - The na-
tion's military forces bade an
affectionate ceremonial farewell
yesterday to Gen. Nathan F. Twin-
ing.
The 62-year-old Twining, one of
the last of the World War II
combat generals to retire from
active service, turned over chair-
manship of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff to Gen. Lyman L. Lemnitzer,
61.
Gen. George H. Decker, 58,
moved up to succeed Lemnitzer as
Army Chief of Staff.
Twining retired to the thunder
of a 19-gun salute after three
years as the nation's top military
officer.
Ceremonial color guards from
all four services marched by in
review at Bolling Air Force Base
as the silver-haired Air Force
general received his retirement
farewell from Secretary of Defense
Thomas S. Gates.
"We' will miss the active and
firm hand of Twining," Gates said,
in brief remarks winding up the
25-minute ceremony.
The farewell parade, accompan-
ied by the roar of six waves of
low-flying Jet planes, came barely
an hour after Twining turned
over the JCS chairmanship to
Lemnitzer in Gates' Pentagon of-
fice.

r

By The Associated Press
Vice-President Richard M. Nix-
on accused Sen. John F. Kennedy
last night of being untruthful
when he said in their television
debate that Russia would be pro-
ducing more power than America
by 1975.
The Republican presidential
nominee said his opponent for the
White House had a responsibility
to the nation to "quit making mis-
statements about the United
States of America" for campaign
purposes.
Communist Use
Nixon said such statements

were picked up and used by the'
Communists to slander this coun-
try abroad.r
The Vice-President also said
Kennedy could find out what
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
is doing if Kennedy would "quit
talking and start reading."
Meanwhile, Kennedy took a
rainy day off in Hyannis Port,
Mass., from his presidential cam-
paign while his staff mapped
plans for a final drive to election
day and slapped back at Nixon.
Last Break
Aides said that under present
campaign plans, Kennedy's Hyan-
nis Port respite will be his last
prior to the Nov. 8 election. The
senator leaves for Chicago early
today.
Nixon, in a campaign address
at Boston Thursday night, charg-
ed Kennedy and the Democrats
with "monumental failure" in
their efforts to push through leg-
islation during the brief late-sum-
mer Congressional session.

Kennedy's press secretary, Pierre
Salinger, said "if Nixon can derive
any satisfaction out of this de-
feat of the legitimate interests of
the people, that is his preroga-
tive."
Mobutu Sees
N ew Hurdles
LEOPOLDVILLE, The Congo (A)
Col. Joseph Mobutu ran into new
obstacles yesterday in his efforts
to get the all but collapsed Congo
government functioning again.
Premier Moise Tshombe of se-
cessionist Katanga Province scut-
tled hopes for any reconciliation
with the central government by

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
-Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sun: 9:00 Worship Service and communion
10:00 a.m. Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Worship service
6:00 p.m. Supper
7.00 p.m. Program "The Moral Responsi-
bility in the Media of Communications"
Tues: 7:15 p m. Teachings of the Various,
Denominations
Fri: 7:30 p.m.Square Dancemeet at Center

i0C

h=
i'rIlE SA
1 BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor.
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 AM. Worship Service
10:45 A.M. Worship Service

8 8 A7rl

Nation Made
Independent
LAGOS, Nigeria (4) -- Nigeria,
Africa's largest nation, was ac-
claimed the continent's newest
fully independent state yesterday
to tremendous national rejoicing.
The new nation of 36 million
was born without any of the birth'
pangs which tortured former Bel-
gian Congo's independence exactly
three months ago.
From the vast desert spaces of
the federation's northern region
to this crowded capital tom tomsE
throbbed and drums beat out Ni-
geria's welcome to national free-
dom after almost 100 years of
British rule.
The symbolic act heralding in-'
dependence was a mammoth mili-
tary show at Lagos Race Track,
crammed to bursting with 40,000
sweating and cheering Nigerians.
Watching from the Royal Pa-
vilion were Queen Elizabeth's rep-
resentative, Princess Alexandra,
federal ministers in their rainbow
colored national costumes and of-
ficial guests from 58 nations.
Among them was the United,
States representative, Gov. Nelson#
A. Rockef1ller of New York, who
flew into Lagos straight from a
presidential election campaign
only a few hours before indepen-
dence was acclaimed.
Ike Promotes
Large Turnout
CHICAGO UP) - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower called yes-
terday for a chain reaction drive
to get out the vote in November
and stimulate Americans to study
the critical issues.
He made the suggestion to the
Polish American Congress after
delivering his first full-fledged
speech of the presidential cam-
paign Thursday night in support
of the Richard Nixon-Henry Cab-
ot Lodge ticket.
The President spoke before 850
delegates and 1,500 guests attend-
ing a meeting of the congress, a
group founded in 1944 with theI
primary aims of counteracting
Communist conspiracy at home
and Soviet expansion abroad.

i

: ,
- -

. 1'

announcing his refusal to deal ambassadors and experts, was on
with the "military representatives" hand.
of the Congo strongman. The day's events left the United
Red Support States delegation at the United
Nations obviously worried and un-

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 3-0589
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 Church School.
8:45. and 1 1:00 Morning Worship Services.
5:30 Student Guild.
5:45 Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 Evening Service
7:30 P.M. Wednesday-Prayer Meeting

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
Sunday:
9:45 Church School and Student Class
"Understanding the Old Testament" taught
by Dr. Edgar Willis in the Campus Center.
11 :00,a.m. World-Wide Communion Sunday
Sermon, "Member, One of Another,"
Mr. Pickett preaching.
6:45 p.m. Because of the retreat, we will
have an informal open house this Snuday.

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister.
Morning Services, 8:45 and 11:00 A.M.
.University Bible Class, 10:00 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.
SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH
216 Beakes St.
Welcomes Students
Rev. C. W. Carpenter, Minister.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
1 1:00 ACM. Morning Service
3:00 P.M. Afternoon service
7:30 P.M. Evening Service
5:30 P.M. BYPU

New Montes
Earmarked
For Defense
WASHINGTON M) - An extra
$169 million in defense funds was'
earmarked for spending by the
Defense Department yesterday,
much of it to speed work on the
Polaris submarine missile.
The aim will be both to step up
production of the 1,200-mile Po-
laris and to push development of
an improved model which it is
hoped will be effective at 2,500
miles.
The spending plans have politi-
cal overtones. Some Democrats
have accused the Administration
of freezing large portions of the
$661.6 million voted by Congress
as an addition to President Dwight
D. Eisenhower's $40.8 billion de-
fense budget for the fiscal year
which started in July.
Conversely, announcement of
plans to spend the $169 million,
plus other funds previously re-
leased, may be cited by Democrats
as an acknowledgement by the
Administration that the original
budget was not adequate.
As part of the $70.7 million ear-
marked to push development of
the longer-range Polaris missile,
the Pentagon said it will divert
to the same program $55.2 million
which had been allocated to work
on a new type nuclear attack sub-'
marine designed chiefly to hunt
down enemy subs.
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

And Mobutu charged that the
Communists are continuing secret
operations in support of former
Premier Patrice Lumumba afterl
they were ordered out of the
country.
(The Belgian radio in Brussels
quoted Mobutu as saying Red
China had promised the Lumumba
government the equivalent of $2.8
million in foreign currency. Red
Chinese Premier Chou En-Lai was
said to have made the offer in a
letter to Antoine Gizenga, a vice-
premier in Lumumba's cabinet.)
Communist Radio
Mobutu said the Reds, whom he
ordered out of the Congo two
weeks ago, have been operating a
clandestine radio station in the
closed-down Czechoslovakian em-
bassy. Mobutu also said a stock of
Czech ammunition was found In
the building.
Mobutu told newsmen that
broadcasts had been made nightly
from the shut-down embassy. He
said the Communist broadcaster
escaped.
CARLOS
MOCAN TOYA
Ann Arbor High
Fri., Oct. 7
8:30 P.M.

happy.
The five neutralist leaders, who
drew up the resolution at a con-
ference last night at UN head-
quarters of the Communist Yugo-
slavs, are Nehru and Presidents'
Tito of Yugoslavia, Kwame Nkru-
mah of Ghana, Sukarno of Indo-
nesia, Gamal Abdel Nasser of the
United Arab Republic.
NOTHING HOLDS LIK:
SPERRY TOP-SIDERS
For your personal safety afloat and ashor4

895
" for non-slip safety White or Navy
* highest flexibility Men's & Women's
* greatest comfort Juniors' 1!4-4' 1
ON ANY DECK OR COURT
At Shoe, Sports, Marine Dept. Stores. Write for
dealer name, style folder
Box 3381
Naugatuck, Conan

'l

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenow at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship Service
, 1:15 A.M. Coffee hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 350 S. 5th
Rev. Miller, Guest Minister
10:00 A.M. and 7:30 P.M. Worship Services.
Services held in new YM-YWCA bldg.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Minister to Students
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship.
World-Wide Communion Sunday. "How
Big is Your World?"
10:15-11:10 a.m. Seminar: Interfaith Discus-
sion on Buddhism, Mr. Chandra Soeng
leading the discussion.
5:30 p.m. Fepllowship Supper
7:00 p.m. Worship and Program. A Student
Panel speaking on My Faith and Campus
Life.
WED ESDAYS
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion in the Chapel
followed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11 :06 a.m. Sunday services
8:00 p.m. Wednesday services
9:30 a.m. Sunday school (adults up to 20
years old)
11:00 a.m. Sunday school (children 2 to 6
years old)
A reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberity, 10:00 to 5:00 daily except Sun-
days and holidays 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Training Union 6:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p.m.
Vespeers, Lane Hall, Tues., Fri. 5:15-5:45
p.m:
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist Con-
vention.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John Fauser, Assistant
Sunday Masses at 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30,-7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:00 P.M.
Daily Masses 6:30, 8:0A and 900 A.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:00 P.M.
Novena Devotions in honor of our Mother of
Perpetual Help. Wednesday evening 7:30.
Classes at the Gabriel Richard will begin this
week.
Monday 8:00 P.M. fundamentals of the
Catholic Faith.
Tuesday 6:45 P.M. scholastic philosophy.
Tuesday 7:00 P.M. nursing ethics.
Tuesday 8:00 P.M. foundations of Christi-
sanity.
Thursday 4:00 P.M. sacred scripture,
Thursday 8:00 P.M. medical ethics.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Sundays--
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDN ES DAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Rd., opposite V.A. Hospital
William S. Baker, Minister
Sunday morning worship 10:45
World Wide Communion
Church school and child care provided

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. in the Sanctuary.
STUDENTS ALWAYS WELCOME
"Go, Do Thou Likewise" Dr. Luchs preaching
Student Guild, 7:00 p.m. 524 Thompson St.
Church School: 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-12:00,
crib through 12th grade.
5:45 p.m. WOIA, 1290, Dr. Luchs' Vesper
Service
Bible Lecture 10:20-10:45 a.m. Dr. Preston
Slosson
GUILD HOUSE
524 Thompson
Associated with the First Congregational
Church, Memorial Christian Church and
Bethlehem Evangelical Reformed Church.
Sunday 9:30 a.m. seminar beginning Sept. 25
at Guild House
Tuesdays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion at
Guild House
Tuesdays 4:30 coffee break
Fridays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL.
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri.Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur L..Dauer, Vicar
Elizabeth Lamb, Director of Music
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
with sermon by the vicar, "Your Christian
Vocation."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program. At 7 showing
of new "sermon from science" movie,
"Windows of the Soul". Public invited.
Tuesday at 8:00: 2nd meeting of Chapel As-
sembly.

1

I

Come

in and see the

__ v __ _ ____ _ ._.. _,.

I

POPULAR
SPECIAL
BICYCLE
(a Raleigh Industries Product)
$4j95
with HANDBRAKES and
STURMEY-ARCHER 3-SPEED GEARS

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Wm. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Services: 9:00 a.m. and 11:55 a.m.
World Wide Communion
Communion Meditation"All One Body We"-
Dr. Henry Kuizenga preaching.
Campus Center Schedule
Sunday, Oct. 2
11:30 a m Coffee Hour in French Room
6:45 p.m. P.C.F. Forum
Dr. Kuizenga, speaker
"What Presbyterians Believe about the
Trinity"
Tuesday, Oct. 4
7:30 p.m. Faith and Existentialism
Teacher: Pat Picket
Lane Hall
9:00 p.m. "Coffee & Conversation"
PatPiketm at.

A N9ew Baptist Church

. . .

WHEN: Sunday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 P.M.
and every Thursday evening at 7:30
WHERE: The New Y.M. -Y.W.C.A.

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