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October 01, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

___

ISR BUILDING-One of the older buildings on campus is this structure, which houses the Insti-
tute for Social Research. Called "a firetrap," the building has in fact caught fire in the past.
Official Terms Building Fire Trap'

have conducted have accumulat-
ed over the past fifteen years.
"With them," explained Voight,
"the social scientists here at the
Institute are able to do research
based on observations over a long
period of time.
"These records are irreplacable;
yet now the only place we have
for storing them is in some large
wooden bins.
Fire Started
"One Sunday morning a few
years ago a small fire started here
in the Institute Building. Luckily
someone was here working and
found it in time.
"If it were not for him, all our
records would have been lost
then."
The appearance of the Insti-
tute building, erected as a hos-
pital building in 1881, alone indi-
cates why the Research Center
has expressed a need for new
quarters.
From the outside its red brick
walls, discolored and worn by na-
ture, contrast sharply with the
yellow brick hospital buildings
and the other modern University
structures which surround it.
Many Interior Patches
Its interior shows signs of many
past attempts to renovate. All
through the building one sees
places where the plaster has been
patched.
The space in the Institute is

inadequate for the large number
of people presently at work there.
"Within the past five years."
Voight pointed out, "the Institute
has increased over sixty per cent,
both in the amount of work being
carried on and in the number of
people employed.
Building Too Small
"This building, affectionately
known as Old West Hospital, has
not been large enough. We have
moved some of our studies into
four nearby houses and sheds.
But now," Voight added, "even
these are bulging."
"Of course, we have many ideas
for our new building. However, we
do not have any particular plan
in mind; that will be for the Uni-
versity and the architect to de-
cide.
"In this new building the plan-
ning committee at the Institute is
trying to prepare for the expan-
sion over the next eight to ten
years.
Desire Central Spot
"We hope it will be located in
the central part of the campus
somewhere near the social science
department and the Union.
"This would make it possible
for more people in the University
to work with us. Also the proxim-
ity to the Union would provide
convenient housing for the many
foreign scholars who come to vis-
it and study at the Institute for
Social Research."

View Ethics,.
Philosophy
In Seminar
By LINDA REISTMAN
"As a philosopher, I want to
show that the problems of ethics
are not insolvable," said Prof.
Charles L. Stevenson of the
philosophy department at Thurs-
day evening's discussion program
on "Language and Ethics," spon-
sored by Student Government
Council.
Prof. Stevenson used one of his
writings entitled "Ethics and Lan-
guage" as the basis of the dis-
cussion.
"My book answers no questions
of what we ought and ought not
to do. It is concerned rather with
the 'reasons' one can give in the
course of answering such ques-
tions," he continued.
Sees Three Areas
Prof. Stevenson approached the
subject from three areas: The na-
ture of the ethical problem to be
handled, what ethical judgments
mean, and the reasons supporting
them.
In discussing the problem to be
handled, Prof. Stevenson said:
"Imagine making a consequential
decision in the privacy of your
room. The essential difference
would lie in believing and approv-
ing of something. This approval
or disapproval is an attitude.
Problems arise when there is a
disagreement or conflict in atti-
tudes. Thus, approvals and dis-
approvals are what is essential to
ethics," he noted.
Dual Quality of Values
'Concerning the meaning of
terms," Prof. Stevenson explained,
"a term like 'good' is used not
only in introspectively describing
one's attitude, but in recommend-
ing a similar attitude to others.
When you say 'it is good' you are
not merely introspecting but ad-
vising others to approve of it.
This gives quasi qualities to the
word 'good."' He called this the
emotive meaning of a word.
"The reasons supporting many
of our ethical judgments become
relevent because they may change
beliefs and thus indirectly change
attitudes. We often approve or
disapprove of something in ig-
norance of its nature or conse-
quences and the reasons are eth-
ics to correct the ignorance."
"U" Scientists
To Help China
With Reactor
University officials announced
today that nuclear scientists from
the University will help the Re-
public of China set up and oper-
ate its first nuclear reactor.
The object of the assistance to
Formosa is to help underdevelop-
ed countries establish their own
atoms-for-peace projects and is
part of a world-wide program. It
will be carried out under a con-
tract between the International
Cooperation Administration and
the Michigan Memorial Phoenix
Project, the University's research
program on peaceful uses of
atomic energy.
Prof. William Kerr from the
Engineering college is director of
the ICA Phoenix program. On Oc-
tober 17 he will leave for For-
mosa where he will advise mem-
bers of the Tsing Hua Institute
of Nuclear Science on the "start
up" and operation of their new
research training reactor.
The Tsing Hua reactor, which

is a one megawatt, swimming pool
type, is similar to the University's
Ford Nuclear Reactor. It is sched-
uled to begin operation next year
"The main reason for assisting
Formosa is to show what non-
Communist nations in Southeasi
Asia can accomplish," said Prof.
Kerr. "Formosa is in an interna-
tionally sensitive spot, which has
a great influence on overseas
Chinese in Southeast Asia, a greal
many of whom come to Formosa
for their education," he added.
One of the Formosan's insti-
tute's problems has been in ob-
taining a senior operating staff,
The ICA will train several in the
United States, five at the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
The University's vice-president
for research, Dean Ralph A. Saw-
yer, visited the Tsing Hua Insti-
ute this April where he discussed
its graduate curriculum in nuclear
science.

By CYNTHIA NEU
God as an evolving phenomenon,
the problems of rational being and
concepts of theology were some of
the sub-topics considered at the

George Peek of the political sci-
ence department, gave brief sum-
maries of the main points raised
in "The Courage. to Be," by Til-
lich and "An Interpretation of
Christian Ethics" by. Niebuhr.
Similarities Noted
In comparing the two theo-
logians, Swanson noted some
basic similarities in their outlooks.
"Both books," he said, "deal
with problems of an ethical char-
acter, religious in outlook, and
Christian in purpose."
In further developing these
considerations, he explained that
Tillich conceived a God above the
God of theism. This higher deity
is not a finished product nor does
it have boundaries.

PROF. GEORGE PEEK
...political implications
Student Government Council
Reading and Discussion seminar
on "Modern Theologians" yester-
day in the Honors Lounge of the
Undergraduate Library.
As an introduction to the sub-
ject, the faculty discussion lead-
ers, Prof. Guy Swanson of the so-
ciology department and Prof.

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Sees Theistic Gap
Tillich's Christian purpose in-
cludes the concept of a gap -be-
tween God and man, a gap exist-
ing in actual life and acting as a
frustration to Mankind.
Tillich further states that man
can have reasonable relations with
this God in spite of the fact that
God is perfect and man imperfect,
and man is finite and small in
importance when compared to
God.
Peek explained the impact of
theology on political issues, espe-
cially in context of a traditional
concept of original sin.
Sin a Disharmony
Niebuhr conceives original sin
as the tendency of man to commit
evil, even though he is born with
the capacity for good. Sin is a
disharmony between man's nature
and spirit, rooted at the conjunc-
tion of these two facets of his
inner nature,
Self-love and pride, with man
trying to place himself on an equal
level with God is the deepest of
all sins.
Original sin and man's limited
rights can be applied to politics,
for example, through the concept
of property, which is the relation
between man and values.
Thus, in Marxian theory, prop-

{1

SOC SEMINAR:
Discuss Modern Theologians

PROF. GUY SWANSON
.' sociological meaning
insolvable problems," Niebuhr
states in his book.
During the discussion the par-
ticipants attempted to gain an
understanding of God in human
terms.
It was pointed out that this
was difficult, particularly with the
view of God in relation to time
and having an inner life without
moral properties.
Sees Cosmological Analogy
An analogy by one participant
dealt with cosmology. One theory
is of a completed universe in
which man can comprehend the
phenomenon present, and the
other as an open universe having
no limits or end, and God revolv-
ing within it.
It was questioned that, if there
is no God, what might a reason-
able man think. One alternative
discussed was atheistic existential-
ism.

.5,

erty is collectivized with the final-
ity of a "heaven on earth."
"Democracy is a method of find-
ing approximate conclusions for

v

TO MEET SUNDAY:
Chairman Announces Choice
Of MUSKET Cast, Choruses

WVUS Vewed'
Not everywhere in the world
can students afford their own
books and domitory rooms, with-
out aid from such organizationsj
as the World University Service,
explained Rais Khan, Grad.
A student of International af-
fairs, Khan comes from Pakistan.
Here, as associate general secre-
tary of the Pakistan WUS national
committee, he saw much of the
inside operations of the organiza-
tion.
In Pakistan dormitories are un-
heated even in winter and con-
sist of bare walls and floor and
minimal furniture. Here, as asso-
ciate general secretary of the
Pakistan WUS national commit-
tee, he saw much of the inside
operations of the organization.
WUS operates free dispensaries,
student hostels, book-lending ser-
vices and mimeographing facili-
ties. "WUS is now building an
international hostel at the Uni-
versity of Karachi," said Khan.
Gives Disaster Relief
In other areas of the world,
WUS has worked since the first
World War to resettle refugees,
give relief to flood victims, and
fight disease. Through large-scale
building and individual student-
to-student "self-help" programs,
WUS aids students in 41 countries.
In two of the eight years Khan
has worked for WUS, he served
as a member of its general as-
sembly. WUS headquarters are in
Geneva, Switzerland. However,
Khan attended a general assembly
meeting in Helsinki and two
South-EasternrAsia conferences.
The two latter, in Djakarta and
Karchi, concentrated on -techni-
ques of cooperative effort and self-
,help.
Self-Help Policy
Self-help also operates on an
individual level. "Students do not
receive money directly. They do
some kind of work for WUS and.
get in return work scholarships,"
said Khan.
Some countries get more aid
than others from the international
assembly. Pakistan, with a popu-
lation of over 75 million, has six
universities, all co-educational. In
addition, there is one medical
school exclusively for women. This
country would then get an above-
average allottment of aid.
Financial aid is not given out-
right. About 30 per cent is given
to a country by the international
assembly, and the remaining 60%
comes from national committee
funds. Even newly established
countries, such as Pakistan, have
furnished their percentages of
money.
"WUS works in very close co-
operation with UNESCO. A dele-
gate from UNESCO comes to all
of the WUS general assembly
meetings, and vice-versa," said
Khan.

11,

Stuens Meet Jackson

_4

MUSKET chairman John Fried,
'61, announced yesterday that
there will be a meeting of the
newly chosen cast at 7:30 to-
morrow in the Third Floor Con-
ference Rm. of the Union.
The cast includes: Jack O'Brien,
'61; Royce Rosenberg, '64SM; Judy
Heric, '61; Mike McArdle, Grad.;
Joe Cos, '61A&D.
Chorus sopranos are: Carole
Coleman, '61M; Linda Cook,l
'62Ed.; Nancy Drennan, '64; Sue
Haas, '61M; Meg Hyatt, '61; Pat
Kidwell, '63; Jeannie Maines,
Grad,; Barbara J. Miller, '64;
Judy Nauman, '63SN; Anna Shaw,
'64; Joan Slatkin, '64; Annafield
Walker, '63SM.
Altos include: Cynthia Beer-
bohm, '64; Linda Heric, '63; Karen
Hersh, '62A&D; Margaret Klee,
'63; Helen Katchmark, '62SM;
Amy Lass, '64SM; Judy McKinney,
'64SN; Ida Putansn, '64A&D;
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

Linda Tann, '62Ed.; Linda Zehner,
'64.
Tenors include: Victor Calcater-
ra, '61; John Hunting, Grad.; Rick
Kaudson, '63; TyMcConnell, '61;
William F. Smith, '63; Martin
Widzer, '62.
Basses are: Michael Baad, '63-
NR; John Chase, '61; Harold
Diamond, '62; Barry Hackner, '64;'
Larry Lentz, '62; aDniel Marcus,
'61; John Mussin, '61; Richard
Perry, '64SM; Gary Souter, '61-
A&D; George VandeBante, '64;
Doug Wonderlic, '61.
Chorus Alternates are: Linda
Smalley, '64; Susan Burt, '62;
Holly Fleischman, '64; Janet
Henry, '63; Diane Kornhauser, '63;
Sheila Goldman, '63; Naomi Leh-
man, '62Ed.; Cindy Ladd, '64SN.
Dance principals include: Elsa
Shaw, '64; Mimi Staelin, '64; Su-
zanne White, '63Ed.; Jill Libman,
'61Ed.; Elizabeth Ann Weldon, '63.
In the dance chorus are: Linda
Cypress, '64; Diane Finkel, '62Ed.;
Joyce Reuter, '63; Julio Martinez,
'61SM; Pete McLean, '62E. Alter-
nates are Joby Diamond, '64 and
Carolyn Fisher, '64.
The Michigan Union Show and
Ko-Eds Too, as MUSKET is more
officially known, will present
"Kismet," the smash Broadway
hit, at a future date.

YOUNG DEMOCRATS-Speaking with the Democratic National
Chairman, Senator Henry Jackson of Washington, are Mary
Ryan, '61N; Judith Bergson, '61; and Paul-Heil, '63. The stu-
dents are leaders of the University Students for Kennedy move-
ment.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
Announces
MIDWEEK DINNERS

Mondays
6 P.M.

Wednesdays
6 P.M.

Fridays
5:30 P.M.

I

Continuous
Today
From 1 P.M.

i

DIAL
NO 8-6416

Nt since "0aABOLIQUE" and"WAGES OF FEAR"
as there beentsuch HERVE-SHATTERING
SUSPENSE Y

ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
GIAN-CARLO MENOTTI'S
"THE MEDIUM"
starring
MURIEL GREENSPON as "BABA"
with KAREN KLIPEC

COMMENCING WED., OCT. 5
RESERVATIONS MUST BE MADE AND
PAID IN ADVANCE 'FOR 4 WEEKS
Rates for affiliated HILLEL members for 4 wks.: $20
Rates for others .......................... $24
Full details available at Hillel office weekdays
and Sundays and evenings after 7.
S.G.C.
TONIGHT and Sunday Night
at 7:00 and 9:15
TEA and .SYMPATHY
Color
DEBORAH KERR
110%1 1. 1 1 Ur-mr

#-

I

LI,-m Ru

w

MARLOWE TEIG
TOM CULTICE

SUZANNE ROY
DIANE FRANJAC

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