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September 28, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-28

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B, 6se

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~, 1960 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

J. S. Proposes

Test Ban,

Bomb

Detection

DISARMAMENT:
Gomulka Suggests Plebiscite

UNITED NATIONS (k)-Wlad-
yslaw Gomulka, Communist chief
of Poland, proposed yesterday
that the world's people vote on
whether they prefer nuclear wea-
pons and missile launching sites
to global disarmament.
The Polish leader's address to
the United Nations General As-
sembly evidently was intended as
a reply to a proposal by President
Dwight D. Eisenhower, although'
he did not mention the United
States President by name.
Eisenhower, in his major ad-
dress to the Assembly Thursday,'
had proposed, among other
things, a plebiscite among the
world's people on whether they
wanted the right of self-govern-
ment.
The 55-year-old Communist
leader said he wanted to comment
on a proposal "put forward from
this rostrum a few days ago." He
then proposed to vote on nuclear
weapons as opposed to disarma-
ment.

Though Gomulka, as expected,
endorsed everything what Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev has
said thus far, his speech was mod-
erate in tone. He even quoted
Eisenhower with "sincere satis-1
faltion" as saying that "men
everywhere want to disarm."
Discussing disarmament in gen-
eral Gomulka blamed what he
called the Western concept of
"balance of terror" for the failure
of disarmament talks.

-AP Wirephotos
GOMULKA SPEAKS - Communist Chief of Poland, Wladyslaw
Gomulka proposed a world plebiscite on disarmament. This
proposal evidently came in answer to President Dwight D.
Eisenhower's proposal for a world vote on the right of self-
government.

I i1

Stud y
New Offer
'Welcomed'
By Russians'
Soviet Delegate Asks
Longer Moratorium
GENEVA (A)-The Big Three
nuclear test ban conference re-
opened yesterday with a United
States offer to conduct no under-
ground nuclear explosions if the
Soviet Union joins in a coordinat-
ed 27-month research program to
improve methods for detecting the
cause of underground disturb-
ances.
The issue of how to detect hid-
den nuclear blasts has been among
the chief obstacles in efforts by
the United States, Britain and the
Soviet Union to reach agreement
to ban nuclear weapons tests.
Soviet delegate Semyon K.
Tsarapkin said he welcomed the
United States proposal and would
study it. Sir Michael Wright, the
British delegate, said Britain fully
backed the United States offer.
Acting United States Delegate
Charles C. Stelle, in a move to
get the resumed negotiations off
to a good start after a five-week
recess, said the moratorium would
run concurrently with a two-year
coordinated research program.
Tsarapkin said he hoped the
proposal does not mean that the
United States intends to resume
nuclear testing after two years.
He said he felt the moratorium
period offered was too short but
that he hoped a compromise
could be reached.
He suggested a moratorium of
four or five years or less if the
proposed coordinated research
program could be completed soon-
er than he anticipated. The Rus-
sians in the past have insisted on
a longer moratorium.
The United States delegation
interpreted Tsarapkin's statement
to imply Soviet recognition of the
Western position that the mora-
torium and the research pro-
gram would have to run concur-
rently.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel
Castro announced he is returning
to Havana today, as the first of
the visiting government leaders
to quit the United-Nations General
Assembly.
He was described as satisfied
with his mission to the UN, which
was climaxed Monday by his four
and a half hour speech to the
General Assembly.
* *
NEW YORK - Guatemala
charged before the UN Assembly
yesterday that Fidel Castro's
government is sending aid to
Jacobo Arbenz Guzman, former
leftwing president of Guatemala,
"to prepare an invasion designed
to overthrow the present govern-
ment of Guatemala."
Jesus Unda-Murillo, the Guate-
malan foreign minister, unleashed
the attack on Castro in a speech to
the 96-nation General Assembly.
HAVANA - Cuban Air Force

fighter planes are making passes
at United States naval aircraft
training over international waters
off Cuba, according to reports
reaching here yesterday.
This may be a campaign of
harassment allied with Prime
Minister Fidel Castro's threats to
push the United States out of the
historic Guantanamo Bay naval
base in eastern Cuba.

Claims West
Would Meet
Red Attacks
LONDON () - Britain warped
the Communist world yesterday
that the West would retaliate with
nuclear weapons in the event of
aggression in Europe.
The determination of the West-
ern nations to protect themselves
with all the devices in their ar-
senal was expressed in a 46-page
booklet published by the Foreign
Office.
Thebooklet was issued at a
time when the whole arms ques-
tion was approaching the center
of the stage at the United Nations
General Assembly in New York.
It also corresponded with new
efforts by Communist East Ger-
many to put the squeeze on West
Berlin.
"To promise not to be the first
to use nuclear arms, even in self-
defense," the booklet said, "would
mean presenting a free gift to a
potential aggressor ...
"In any case there could be no
guarantee that any paper renun-
ciation of the use of nuclear
weapons would in fact be observed.
The Soviet call for this renuncia-
tion contrasts oddly with the var-
ious Soviet threats to use rockets
against Western and other coun-
tries .. ..
"Therefore, so long as there is
no effective agreement on dis-
armament, it will be necessary to
retain the whole range of de-
fensive armory,"

F
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Cheered by thousands on Ohio
streets and roadsides, Sen. John
F. Kennedy said yesterday that
a democratic administration "will
never accept as a final solution"
the Soviet enslavement of Eastern
Europe.
Kennedy got a boost when Ohio's
unpredictable, ' lone-wolf senior
senator Frank Lausche showed up
to say he would support Kennedy.
Lausche, a spectacular vote-getter
even though he is usually at odds
with party regulars, had boycotted
the Sunday gathering.
Meanwhile, Vice-President Rich-
ard M. Nixon staged his sixth
political invasion of the South
yesterday, calling again for pro-
gress on civil rights.
In the wake of Monday night's
rather mild-mannered television
debate, Nixon accused Kennedy
of talking differently in different
parts of the nation. He also urged
Tennesseans not to believe "this
chatter and nonsense" about any
weakening of American strength.
"A candidate for the presidency
of the United States," he said,
"has the responsibility to talk the
same, North, East, South, or West.
I regret that my opponent, since
his nomination, has not done
that."
Kennedy didn't mention civil
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

Soviets Back Berlin Air Control

See

Prospect

You are cordially invited to our

IN OHIO:
Lausche Backs Kennedy
Nixon Asks Progress
By The Associated Press

BERLIN (P)-The Soviet Union
today gave full support to Com-
munist East Germany in its
squeeze on West Berlin and told
the United States to prevent what

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* 5

a

autumn

fashion show

i2<A

Friday, September 30th
Informal Modeling
1:00 to 4:00 P.M.

Of Settlement
Ini Laos Strife
VIENTIANE, Laos (I)-Diplo-
matic sources said last night pros-
pects have brightened for a set-
tlem-ent of Laos' 17-day-old civil
war between the neutralist gov-
ernment of Premier Souvanna'
Phouma and rightwing rebels un-
der Gen. Phoumi Nosavan.
The optimistic reports came
a f t e r government parachute
troopers took the initiative against
Phoumi forces earlier yesterday.
The government units involved
represent only a token force but
much of the area surrounding
Savannakhet is controlled by pro-
Communist Pathet Lao guerril-
las, who are violently opposed to
Phoumi.
Souvanna has pledged to seek
peace with the Pathet Lao.
Western diplomats here said a
bold government move against
Savannakhet could well turn the
tide against Phoumi. The anti-
Communist general broke with
the Souvanna government Sept.
10, declaring he would not com-
promise with the Pathet Lao.
Informed sources said Phoumi
may become more amenable now
to Laotian King Savang Vat-
thana's repeated calls for a meet-
ing of all Mrilitary commanders
to end the conflict.
COEDS:
It's Hairstyling
Galore !
No Appointment Needed
Custom-Styling
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Doily
CORRECTION
feature:
one group of
NOVELTY
CASHMERE
SWEATERS
by famous maker
1/AOFF
KESSELS
Nickels Arcade -217 So. Main

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DRY CLEANED and PRESSED
m 111

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COLLIDS SHOP
State and Liberty

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