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June 02, 1965 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1965-06-02

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NEW GRADING SYSTEM
MUST BE INSTITUTED
See Editorial Page

Y

Sir iAau

&111J4ii

CLOUDY
High-83
Low-60
Humid with
possible showers

Seventy-Four Years of Editorial Freedom
VOL. LXXV, No. 20-S ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 1965 SEVEN CENT

S FOUR PAGES

Johnson Discusses
Policy Problems
G,
WASHINGTON (P)-President Lyndon B. Johnson held his first
news conference yesterday since the end of April and announced
that 2000 Marines were being withdrawn from the Dominican
Republic, and a message was being sent to Congress asking for $89
million in economic aid to Southeast Asia.
He also announced plans to address the UN General Assembly
at a commemorative session in San Francisco the last week in
June.
After a flare-up of fighting in which Communist forces dealt
heavy losses to the South Vietnamese, in the war there, Johnson
- said, "We had anticipated we
would have some actions of this!
e V'i'W cnool type at.this season of the year."
He said South Vietnamese losses
are reported to have reached the
Ni ay Inr hundreds and those of the Viet
Cong are unknown but believed to
-~-Asociaed Pe-~-be substantial.
-Associated Press s ;
1Even as he spoke, it was an-
alks with British Defense Secre- ;roversv nounced in Seoul, Korea that 25,-
in Paris yesterday. At right is !/ 000 South Korean combat troops
s proposed a nuclear executive B JOHN MEREDITH will be sent to South Viet Nam
y Ethis month, according to the in-,
A potential political contro- fluential Seoul newspaper Chosun
versy may complicate establish- Ilbo
s ment of a new state-supported The govsrnmen so authori-
for-ea clgeinth Sgiawtative wpprgovernment otdsources as say-
four-year college in the Saginawing the planned shipment of two
" Valley area.
divisions will include some ma-
William Groening, head of a rines but will be mostly infantry-
be more concerned about friction p r i v a t e organization currently men.
over Berlin or troubles in East- raising funds to help finance the The South Korean defense m-
ern Europe which might spread to proposed new institution, said last istty declined comment.
the NATO area, night that a site for the schoolsn
French Defense Minister Pierre suggested by House Majority Korean Troops
Messmer said NATO's deterrent Leader J. Bob Traxler (D-Bay South Korea has sent 2,000 non-
force can be effective only if the City) might be unacceptable to his combat engieers and self-defense!
alliance makes plain it is willinggroup units to Viet Nam since Septem-
mksigber.
to employ nuclear power as soon Withhold Funds? In answering a question about}
am there is a clear case of Cosn This would mean, he said, that Supreme Court decisions follow-
munist aggression. the money raised conceivably ing its one-man one-vote doctrine
But British Defense Minister might not be made available to and proposals in Congress to
Denis Healey said the most prob- the state. A bill permitting the amend the Constitution to get

Conference Approves
Three-Nation Mission

Into Santo

UNITED STATES DEFENSE SECRETARY Robert S. McNamara to
tary Denis Healey, left, at the NATO defense ministers conference1
Thomas K. Finletter, U.S. representative to NATO. The U.S. ha
committee within NATO at the meetings.
U.S. Proposes An

DOmIngo
Some 2000
Marines To
Be Removed
U.S., Brazil, Salvador
To Participate in Plan
WASHINGTON (P) - A special
inter-American conference was re-
ported practically agreed last
night on sending a three-nation
mission to the Dominican Repub-
lic to help restore peace in that
country.
Delegates said there was mark-
ed progress during a closed session
of more than two hours and re-
ported that the United States,
Brazil and Salvador would be
named to undertake the mission.
homas R. Copi
"We are just about to approve
y defended the three-nation plan after the
of national rewording of a part of the pro-
speech at posal," Ambassador Guillermo Se-
villa Sacasa of Nicaragua, presi-
dent of the conference, said.

PARIS (P)-The United States,
has proposed that a committee of
four or five NATO members be
set up to study nuclear policy and
procedures for the Atlantic alli-
ance to give America's allies a
bigger voice in nuclear decisions.
Defense Secretary Robert S. Mc-
Namara advanced the proposal to
j a session of the defense ministers
of NATO. It apparently was a new
U.S. effort to meet demands of
France and other NATO partners
for a voice in the life-and-death
decisions which might face the
West in a future crisis.
Should Meet
McNamara said the committee
should meet as promptly and fre-
quently as necessary to study:
-How to expand allied partici-
pation in planning the use of both
High ourt
Hears Pleas
On Elections
WASHINGTON (/P) - The Su-
preme Court ruled yesterday on
legislative reapportionment dis-
putes in New York, Illinois, Cali-
fornia and Idaho involving widely
different aspects of its "one-man,
one-vote" decree.
The court, preparing to start its
summer recess after next Mon-
day's decision day, cleared up
without hearing arguments all of
its pending reapportionment cases
by:
-Refusing 8 to 1 to hold up a
special election in New York state
next Nov. 2. A federal district
court ordered the election over ob-
jections by the state Supreme
Court that 15 more legislators
would be elected than the 150 the
state consitution prescribes;
The dissenter, Justice John M.
Harlan, wanted to grant a quick
high court hearing on the issue,
declaring "I am wholly at a loss
to understand the court's casual
way of disposing of this matter
and I can find no considerations
of any kind which justifies it;"
-Ruling 8 to 0 that the federal
court in Illinois step aside for a
reasonable time but keep watch
to give the state agencies a chance
to redistrict the Illinois state Sen-
ate on a population basis;
-Upholding unanimously-but
three justices "reluctantly" - a
federal court order that California
must reapportion its Senate by
July 1 on a population basis even
though the state's voters three
times have rejected efforts to
change the present alignment;
and
-Unanimously refusing to in-
tervene in a suit by two Idaho cit-
izens challenging the fairness of
the state's new legislative reappor-
tionment law passed on March 25.
In the civil rights field, the
court acted on major appeals by:
-Agreeing to review at its next
term the dismissal of federal con-
spiracy indictments against six

strategic and tactical nuclear
forces.
-Methods for quick consulta-
tion among NATO members on
any decision to use nuclear forces.
This could include "hot lines" be-
tween NATO capitals.
McNamara said the U.S. wants
to join other NATO nations in
working-outemeasures to provide
greater "nuclear participation" for
members so desiring.
He said this would be in addi-
tion to anything the alliance might
do about the controversial pro-
posals for a Multilateral Nuclear
Force (MLF) or an Atlantic Nu-
clear Force (ANF). Both projects
have encountered stiff opposition
from French President Charles, de
Gaulle.

fE
I
I
I

-Daily-T
VICE-PRESIDENT HUBERT HUMPHREY yesterda
U.S. Vietnamese policies and warned against "wars
liberation"--"a new sophisticated type of war"--in a
East Lansing.

1

1171,7a n u~irn

able threat was from frontier in-I
cidents, and present NATO forces
could handle these without nu-
clear weapons.
Soviet Threatj
West German Defense MinisterI
Kai-Uwe von Hassel said the So-
viet threat to Europe has not less-

Not Specify ened and the combat effectivenessI
Under present U.S. law, con- of Soviet and East European forc-t
trol of U.S. nuclear weapons rests es has increased.
with the U.S. President. The ministers had before them
McNamara did not specify a report from a special NATO De-
whether the proposed committee fense Plans Committee of experts
would control the nuclear trig- acting under a directive adopted
ger or if it would operate by unan- in Ottawa in 1963 for a review of
imity or majority decision. the alliance's strategic position.
McNamara declared that the So- The ministers are discussing
viet attitude has changed a great this report, but it is not expected
deal since the Cuban missile cris- they will attempt to reach any
is of 1962 and there is far less decisions at this time. Instead,I
danger of a massive Soviet at- they are expected to bring in a
tack. recommendation at the next reg-
More Concerned ular NATO ministerial conference
He suggested that NATO should in Paris in December.

I establishment of the new school'
(passed by the House and await-
ing action in the Senate) requires
$4 million in private funds be-
fore the state will contribute tax
money to the venture, and Groen-
ing's organization is the onlyj
group currently raising money for
the project.
Moreover, the bill stipulates
that the site for the school must
be approved by the State Board of
Education and the Legislature.
The Groening faction has selecetei
a site which, while probably ac-
ceptable to the state board, has
been criticized by Traxler as in-
accessable to Bay City, one of the
Sthreemajor Saginaw Valley cities
(along with Saginaw and Mid-
land) which the new school sup-

around a ruling requiring reap- j- & gg E1E N N ('
portionment of many state legis-
latures, Johnson said, "I am gen-
erally sympathetic with the re- (
throughout the country in com- . Fei
apportionment that is taking place U o je itruhu h onr ncm
pliance with the Supreme Court's ByROBER
decision."
Elaborating on his view that a Co-E
Communist threat still exists in Special To

,
,,
I

Ge miniSpace Crews
Readied for Thursday
CAPE KENNEDY R)---Command pilot James McDivitt said yes-
terday he and his space partner, Edward White, and their Gemini 4.
spacecraft were ready for a Thursday launching on their marathon
space journey.
"We've got a good spacecraft," said McDivitt following a two-;
hour review of the mission, "and it looks to me like we are goingl
to have a good mission. We're ready.",
The Astronauts were given an excellent bill of health.
No Hitch ------ --- ------
If no hitch develops, McDivitt.
and White will lift away at 9 a.m.,
(EST) Thursday on a mission
that encompasses all the prime
objectives of the Gemini pro-
gram.
Most of the headline-catching
action will be packed into the
first seven hours when the two
astronauts take the spacecraft up
for ,a planned four-day spin
Thursday.
During those early hours Mc-
Divitt twice is to steer Gemini 4
to within a few feet of another
orbiting satellite. On 'one of the
approaches, White is to leave the?
spacecraft and float between the
two satellites on the end of a
lifeline.
Early Maneuvers
These feats are scheduled early
in the flight because after a few
hours the orbiting second stage
of the Titan 2 booster rocket- ..
the target for the maneuvers-
will be too far away in its separ-
ate orbit to make the maneuvers
practical.
After the initial burst of ac- I

posedly will serve. Traxler has
proposed an alternate site about
five miles away from the location.
announced by Groening.
Undesirable
However, Groening considers
this site undesirable because he
feels it will soon develop into an
industrial area not conducive to
a quiet college campus.
He indicated that "We might
feel obligated to consult with our
donors before turning the money
over to the state if the Traxler
site is finally approved."
The Groening group has raised'
approximately $2.5 million to
date. If it is able to reach $4 mil-
lion by the end of June, the fed-
eral government will add a con-
tribution of $750,000.'

the Dominican Republic, John-
son said it was greater before 21,-
000 Americans-the approximate
peak-arrived there.
"The Communists," he said, "did
not in our judgment originate this
revolution. But they joined it and
they participated in it. They were
active in it, and in a good many
places they were in charge of it."
Johnson Doctrine?
At that point he was asked
whether he had in mind enunciat-
ing "a new Johnson doctrine un-
der which American troops would
be used to prevent the establish-
ment of a Communist government
anywhere in the Western hemis-
phere."
"No," the President said. "I am
afraid that the people that have
branded the Johnson doctrine
were unfamiliar with the fact that
the nations of this hemisphere
have repeatedly made it clear that
the principles of Communism are
incompatible with the principles
of the inter-American system, just
as President Kennedy made it
abundantly clear. That is the
basis of our own attitude on the
matter. I am sorry I got some
folks excited by it."

EAST LANSING-Marshaling
lessons drawn from current an
Hubert Humphrey presented here
fense of U.S. policies in Viet Nam.
He also spent a large part o
of Communist wars of national
aggression which could rank in mil
of gunpowder."
In justifying U.S. policies in V
as students of history you may d
I decision to take up the responsi-
bilities which the French relin-
quished in 1954, this question has
little relevance for the policy-
maker today."
This is because, regardless of
whether the 'U.S. was right in en-
tering Viet Nam at first, any cur-
rent substantial change in U.S.
policy - such as the withdrawal
recommended by many adminis-
tration critics-would be a breachE
of U.S. promises and commitments
to the Vietnamese and would have
disastrous effects on the security}
of many countries, including the
U.S., Humphrey said.
A withdrawal "would only weak-j
en the position of free societies in
Asia," he asserted.
Withdrawal would in addition
mean a strategic victory for the
militant Chinese in the Sino-So-
viet ideological conflict, Humphrey
said, a victory harmful to the
Soviet-American efforts at coex-
istence.
Humphrey also repeated the ad-i
ministration offer of "uncondi-
tional discussions" to settle the
war in Viet Nam and declared
that the final aim of the U.S. is
a political solution.
If peace comes to Southeast
Asia, Humphrey said, the U.S. can:
go ahead with full support for "a
massive cooperative development!
effort-not only for Viet Nam but
for all of Southeast Asia."
Referring to the 1930's, Hum-
phrey said that the two para-
mount lessions of the era were
these:
-"You can never appease an
aggressor. Hitler taught us this.
-"Racism is a consumate evil.
The war taught us this also."
Non-Communist nations are
threatened more every year by "a
new sophisticated form of war-
fare" that is becoming a major
challenge to U.S. security, Hum-{
phrey said.

1-IJohnson Order
De Lie16 tMeanwhile, President Lyndon B.
Johnson ordered 2000 Marines out
of the Dominican Republic, yes-
terday although he said that he
does not feel the Communist
threat is over in the revolt-torn
Caribbean island.
T HIPPLER The withdrawal of 2000 more
ditor Marines will remove about half
The Daily the 4100 men on duty there but
leave about 16,000 Marines, para-
moralprecets, satistcsran troops and Air Force men on the
d past diplomacy, Vice-President island.
e yesterday a comprehensive de- The President said he had been
advised by the commander of the
f his time in a lengthy analysis inter-American force created by
liberation-"a bold new form of the Organization of American
itary importance with the discovery states that conditions permit a
further reduction of United States
Viet Nam, Humphrey said, "though forces.
At the peak of the U.S. inter-
vebate the wisdom of the original vention, there were 21,800 U.S.
military personnel in the Domini-
can Republic, officials said.
FactionsTo News Conference
Johnson made thenannounce-
ment of the new withdrawal at a
D e ~an d N eW news conference, his first since
April 27.
The President said, "The situa-
tion in the Dominican Republic
continues to be serious." But he
said the Brazilian and American
One of the two warring factions commanders on the scene had rec-
of the Livingston County Demo- ommended the force reduction,
cratic Party announced yesterday and he welcomed continued ef-
I that it plans 'to appeal a circuit forts by the Organization of Amer-
court judge's ruling that the par- ican States to strengthen the OAS
ty must hold a second convention role there.
in late July because proper con- The OAS conference explored
vention procedures were not fol- the three-nation plan-proposed
lowed last September. by Brazil-in closed meetings
Ruth Munzel, vice chairman of throughout the day yesterday.
the faction headed by Edward New Elections
Rettinger, said that since Circuit The proposal is aimed at re-
Court Judge Leonard Bebau said storing peace to the Dominican
that there was no statute to "guide Republic and pacing the way for
me at this step," and did not base new elections.
his opinion on legal precedent, the In Santo Domingo, Gen. Antonio
Rettinger group feels it worth- Imbert Barrera said the civilian-
while to appeal the ruling and military junta he heads will nev-
hope for a more favorable deci- er give up control of the presiden-
sion. tial palace to the OAS.
Bebau ruled May 28 that the He denied any agreement had
elections made during two con- I been reached to turn over the bat-
fused "rump conventions" last tered former seat of government
September 12 were not binding. -only a block from rebel lines-
He said that the faction led by to an OAS force.
Rettinger had not mailed properI i
notifications for its "rump con- A In Principler
vention," and that the other fac- OAS secretary-General Jose A.
tion, led by Brian Levan and his Mora told newsmen Sunday night
brother Martin, held its conven- an agreement h principle had
tion without a proper chairman. been made with the junta to put
Violent Convention an OAS force in the palace and
T ViosepnratConveton nto extend the international se-
The separate "rump, conven- curity zone boundary to embrace
tions" were held because the reg- it
ular convention scheduled Sep- Imbert said the only matter un-
tember 12 broke into dissension der discussion now between the
and violence. OAS and the junta was the ex-
Bebau ruled that the new con- tension of the security zone to
vention must be held under two cover the palace.
conditions:
-It must be held between 50- Yesterday the OAS planned
60 days of the trial date, May 28; more negotiations with the Do-
-It must be chaired by the last minican junta in an effort to ex-
legally elected chairman, Retting- zone arounternational plceia
er.zokaromdrentina
r block from rebel lines.

I

Georgia men accused in the shot- tivity, the two air force majors

gun slaying near Athens, G., last will settle down to their main task -Daily-honmas R. Copi,"War of natnllibt"-
July 11 of Lemuel A. Penn, Dis- -learning how well man can with-=Wr fntonllbrto"
trict of Columbia Negro educator; stan igor livn n a TYPE, TELETYPE, TYPEWRITERS, TYPOS-and the lineotype is 75 years old this year, too. The guerrilla warfare such as that in
this appeal challenges a ruling by spaceship for long periods. Em- Daily will be celebrating its anniversary this fall-75 years of chaos, commotion, crisis and, of South et Na, is m erent
U.S. District Judge W. M. Bootle phasis will be on gathering medi-;course, editorial freedom. There are many ingredients behind any newspaper. Some of them are from conventional battle, he said.
of Macon, Ga., that the Justicephsswlbeogaernmdi cus, This is "a war in which leaders
cal data. shown above. cannot be located, sources of
Department had failed to showcantb lotesues f
Dioaton tfhfdralds; But they also will practice ma-. supply cannot be easily cut off, in
violation of federal law; neuvering the Gemini 4: conduct which the enemy forces are not
thinf ae Win n aroll rom U.o numerous scientific, photographic I f1l v d ! U' n n 1 versarv sToutsiders but indigenous troops."

Part of Ruling
The appeal of the Rettinger
faction is only of that part of B
Bebau's ruling which rescheduled U Bt
the convention. The part which
retained Rettinger as county

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