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May 28, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-28

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FRIDAY, MAY 28 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T ER. .

JL t16"Ju 1 Liibi.b

DOMINICAN PLANS:

Congress Gets Briefing,

U.S., Britain Seek Treaty BOLIV IAN MINES:
To Extend 1963 Test Ban Shaky Cease Fire Still Holds

By The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (P)-The White1
House gave congressional leaders .
yesterday a Dominican progress'
report indicating much remains to
be done toward patching up the
McGeorge Bundy, President Lyn-
don B. Johnson's national security
affairs adviser, reported to a bi-
partisan group of House and Sen-
ate leaders on his just completed
11-day effort to bring rival Do- s fr'
minican factions together in an .
interim government. b:l':1
Administration sources made
these things plain:r
-They wantboth the rival Do-:
minican leaders-junta Brig. Gen.
Antonio Imbert Barrera and rebel.
Col. Francisco Caamano Deno-to .
step down from power in the pro-
posed provisional. government. But'
all-or-nothing extremists on both
Aides have prevented agreement on
a broadly based coalition regime L S LT. GEN. BRUCE PALME]
so far. forces in the Dominican Repub
-The Organization of American the commander of Brazilian troo]
States should conduct the outside In the wake of Bundy's return,
mediating effort and the inter-
American force-made up mainly administration sources said the
of U.S troops-will be needed on provisional government will have
the Caribbean island for a consid- tohbe substantiallybroadertthan
erable time. . the forces headed by Imbert and

LONDON-The U.S. and Britain are drafting a joint treaty which
would extend the 1963 American-Russian-British test ban into an
international ban against all nuclear weapon tests-including under-
ground testing, Prime Minister Harold Wilson disclosed yesterday.
Government officials expect the draft to be complete in a week
or so for discussion with other allied powers.
To achieve an extended treaty, the Wilson government has indi-
cated favor toward reducing the Western demand for seven on-site
inspections a year. This demand,
rejected by Russia, has blocked ne-
gotiation of a complete test ban.
agreement.
There seems to be a possibility
that the agreement may be pre-
sented to the United Nations Dis-}
armament Commission in New ''.. w,
York if it is swiftly endorsed by;
other allied powers.
In general the British-American<
aims are these: r<
-To bind nuclear powers to anf
Igreement never to transfer actual
H-weapons, the information on
how to make them or give control'
of the weapons to nations which
do not now possess them, and

By The Associated Press
LA PAZ, Bolivia-The govern-
ment here sought to dispel fears
of new clashes between troops and
tin miners yesterday as dynamite
explosions and gunfire injured at
least three persons.
Government sources reported
that 16 persons were arrested in
connection with the blasts.
"Troop movements do not sig-
nify a mobilization which would
affect military posts near the
mines, but are only a move by
the government to end terrorism,"
Gen. Alfredo Ovando, co-president
with Gen. Rene Barrientos of the
junta, said.
The blasts and the refusal of
one group of tin miners to release
several soldiers held as hostages
threatened the cease-fire agreed
to Tuesday by the ruling military
junta and the Central Bolivian
Workers Association.
Soldiers were moved into the
suburban sections, where the ex-
plosions occurred, to root out the
snipers and look for caches of
dynamite.
Sunday night the junta placed
all the tin mines under military
jurisdiction. At the same time it
attempted to fend off charges that
it was using the mines to support
a large army and bureaucracy by
reducing the salaries of govern-

ment employes, including the
president.
On Monday fighting broke out
over the expulsion of Juan Lechin,
tin mine union head and former
vice-president from Bolivia, for
opposing the mine seizure.
Three or more persons were
killed and 24 wounded as snipers
battled police outside La Paz and
spread disorder that had begun
with a strike by leftist tin miners

to protest the expulsion of their
chief.
By government estimates, 70
persons died during a week of
violence which followed the de-
portation of Lechin.
With Lechin's deportation, tin
miners walked out and the work-
ers association called a general
strike, which was effective only
in La Paz. The cease-fire ended
the general strike.

R, left, commander of American
lic, gets his OAS armband from
ps.
can troops with the arrival of
more Brazilian units.
The force at present consists of
250 Hondurans, 159 Nicaraguans,
21 Costa Ricans and 612 Brazil-
ians. Eventually the Brazil con-
tingent will number 1,170. U.S.
troops here are also part of the
force but will be reduced sharply.

-To bind non-nuclear powers
to an agreement never to manu-
facture, buy or otherwise acquire
control of H-weapons.
The British and Americans, in-
formants said, also may be ready
to consider arrangements that
would bring China into negotia-
tions designed to stop the spread
of nuclear weapons.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON--A House committee approved yesterday a bill
that would require health warnings on cigarette packages but would
bar the Federal Trade Commission from requiring similar warnings
in advertising,
The FTC drew a stormy reaction from the cigarette industry
when it announced last year that it would require health warnings on
labels and in advertising, beginning July 1. Congress stepped into
the breach.
WASHINGTON-Food, clothing and gasoline headed a list of
price increases that boosted living costs three-tenths of one per
cent last month, the government reported yesterday.
The consumer price index shows it took $10.93 to buy goods
that cost $10 in the 1957-59 base period-thus chipping another 3
cents from the purchasing power of a $10 bill.
LANSING-The House staged "the funeral of fiscal reform for
this year and possibly next year" Wednesday as 55 Democrats opposed
a move to remove-from the table a package of fiscal reform bills.
The new tax bill, delayed until yesterday because of technical
difficulties, would levy a tax of $1.10 per $1,000 in real estate
transfers, raising an estimated $2 million for the county in which
the transfer papers were drawn up, and $2 million for the state.
* * * *
CAIRO-The Arab government leader's conference yesterday de-
nounced Tunisian President Habib Bourguiba's statements favoring
coexistence between the Arab states and Israel.

Secretary of State Dean Rusk,
who attended the White House
session along with the President
and Secretary of Defense Robert
S. McNamara, turned to the diplo-
'matic effort afterward in a meet-
ing with Brazilian Foreign Minis-
ter Vasco LeItal Da Cunha.

f

- Across
Cami pus

Uaamano. And there is a general
feeling that a good answer cannot
be found with either leader in the
center of a new regime. Both men
are said to recognize this.
The United States meanwhile
is concerned about keeping the
country from collapsing econom-
ically before an interim govern-
ment is established. It has sup-
plied $3.24 million so far to pay
government workers who otherwise
would have gone penniless since
the revolt which started April 24.
In Santo Domingo, U.S. Marines
continued to leave the battlefront
while replacements continued to
pour in for the inter-American
force taking over policing duties.
The ,inter-American force cre-
ated by the Organization of Amer-
ican States to help restore peace
to the Dominican Republic has
now grown to 1,042 Latin Ameri-

PRIME MINISTER WILSON

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FRIDAY, MAY 28
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present "Shoulder Arms,"
starring Charlie Chaplin, in the
Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players,
Department of Speech Production,
will present Carl Oglesby's "The
Hero" in Trueblood Aud.

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
oticial publication of The Univer-
sit) of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-}
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TVPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organisation notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, MAY 28
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-Paul Pi-
gors, professor of industrial relations,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
"The Management of Employe Disci-
pline": Michigan Union, 8 a.m.
Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin in
"Shoulder 'Arms": Architecture Aud.,
7 and 9 p.m.

NDEA Title IV Fellows : Stipend ' Educ. or rel. plus 1 yr. exper.
checks for summer tenure may be substitute MA for exper.
picked up in Room 118 Rackham Bldg. *
upon presentation of evidence of regis- For further information, please
tration. 764-7460, General Div., Bureau of
pointments, 3200 SAB.
Placement SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
POSITION OPENINGS: The Summer Placement Service
Harvard Law School, Board of Student camps listed looking for staff with
Advisers, Cambridge, Mass.-Secretaries, following skills:
women grads with secretarial skflls to Men--Archery, campraft, water
direct and coordinate efforts of first rifery, nature, canoeing, arts & crf
year law students. Iurileatr, caunoeings,artsk&dcii
St. Joseph County, Centreville, Mich. unit leaders counselors, truck drl
-Equalization Director. Degree, bkgd. Uomen-Unit leaders, arts & cr
in city govt., tax work o real estate, nature, campcraft, waterfront, etc.
Some exper. pref. Evaluate & compare Keithley Instruments, Inc., Cleve
county property value. Application Ohio-Market Research Ass't.,
deadline June 21. candidate, BS Physics or EE. Ha
Washington State, Olympia-1. Parks several product & mkt. res. protects
& recreation consultant, BA plus 3 Wanted: Man, Boy Scout bkgd.
yrs. park & rec. exper. 2. Day Care troop at Bruin Lake from July 2
Repres., MA Elem. Educ. or Soc. Work July 3. $50-$75
plus 2 yrs. exper. 3. Work & Trng. * * *
Coordinator, BA Soc. Set., Bus. Ad.. Details available at Summer P

call
Ap-

ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg.
TUES., JUNE 1-
Michigan Carton Co., Battle Creek,
Mich., Atlanta, Ga.-BS:MS: IE; Pro-
duction.

May ment, 212 SAB.

It bypassed an agenda item containing a proposal by the head
of the Palestine Liberation Organization, Ahmed Shukairi, for
expulsion of Tunisia from the Arab League and Arab summit
conferences.

WA

I

SECOND ANNUAL
SALINE JAYCEE
RODEO
a Decker Bros. Production
a sanctioned professional rodeo
4D RANCH
9602 W Waters Rd.
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
May 29 8:00 P.M.
May 30 2:00 & 8:00 P.M.
May31 2:00 P.
ADULTS $2.00 CHILDREN 50c

University Players, Dept. of Speech
Production-Carl Oglesby's "The Hero":
Trueblood Aud., Frieze Bldg., 8 p.m.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: June 18. Commu-
nications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands no later than June 4.
Students, College of Engineering: The
final day for dropping courses without
record will be Wed., June 2. A course
may be dropped only with the permis-
sion of the classifier after conference
with the instructor.

ENDING SATURDAY
"Bergman, with his
first color film, proves
as masterful as with
black and white. A
mischievously a,;g-
ing free-style frolic,
pLayfull yAkrowin g
darts at critics, fame,
censors and female
admirers." ..cu.
Ingmar
M j Firs Film is Color
"I 2.LL
252
-COMING SUNDAY--
"LOVE, THE ITALIAN WAY"

I

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ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAD.,
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with
instruction, Fri., May 28, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.
Graduate Outing Club, Outing to Sil-
ver Lake, Sun., May 30, 2 p.m., Rack-
ham (on Huron).

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