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May 18, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-18

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, TTJESDAY, MAY 18, 1965

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PACE THREE

17-'

Lull in Air Strikes
Remains Unexplained
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-For the fifth consecutive day, the United States
has launched no air strikes against North Viet Nam.
U.S. government officials in Saigon refused to say why the
raids on North Viet Nam have been stopped.
The New York Times reported from Washington that the United

Senate Tries New Tactic
To Solve Poll-Tax Issue
WASHINGTON(,P)--The United field of Montana offered an
States Senate leadership tried a I amendment which would make a
new move yesterday to get around congressional declaration' that ina
the state poll-tax issue which certain states the right to vote
stands as a principal roadblock is being denied or abridged by
to enactment of a voting-rights poll-tax requirements.
law. This proposal, offered along
Democratic leader Mike Mans- with Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (R-
Ill), the Republican leader, would
supplant an earlier leadership
W orld News proposal which would merely have
-mNstructed the attorney general to
challenge state poll taxes in court,
R oundu without putting Congress on rec-
ord that they serve as bars to
voting.

Farmer Vows Continued Housing Fight

States had emporarily suspended

the air strikes as a sign of good
faith to support President Lyndon
B. Johnson's offer to negotiate.
Accidental Explosion
Also, American and South Viet-
namese air forces yesterday hit
suspected Communist emplace-
ments in South Viet Nam, but the
most serious action was accidental.
An accidental expplosives blast
that shook Bien Hoa air base Sun-
day, killing 27 and injuring 103
Americans, necessitated extensive
and hazardous work yesterday by
demolition experts to make the
field safe.
One Bomb
U.S. officials said Sunday's mul-
ti-million dollar disaster began
with the explosion of a bomb that
had been loaded aboard a B57
Canberra jet bomber. Wing to
wing, neighboring planes on the
flight line began exploding and
burning within seconds. Concus-
sion temporarily knocked out the
control tower. An ammunition
dump blew up later, without cas-
ualties.
The New York Times, besides
suggesting the suspension was a
sign of Johnson's good will to ne-
gotiate, said Secretary of State
Dean Rusk was believed to have
cited this in proposing further dis-
cussions on Viet Nam to Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko
at a Vienna conference Saturday.

DEAN RUSK
across
Campus
TUESDAY, MAY 18
4:10 p.m.-George H. Ford of
the University of Rochester will
speak on "Three Stories by D. H.
Lawrence" in Aud. A.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 19
8:45 a.m.-The School of Public
Health will sponsor a lecture, "The
Education of the Diabetic Child
and His Family" in 3042 PH Bldg.

By The Associated Press
SELMA, Ala. - Attorneys de-
fending Sheriff James G. Clark
against a contempt of court com-
plaint tried to show yesterday that
the sheriff was carrying out or-
ders of a state judge in breaking
up several Negro civil rights dem-
onstrations.
LA PAZ, Bolivia - The ruling
military junta was attacked yes-
terday in a violent street demon-
stration by factory workers pro-
testing the banishment of former
Lefist Vice President Juan Lechin.
A general strike shut down the
city.
Police used tear gas in an hour
and a half battle to disperse some
7,000 demonstrators called out by
the Bolivian Labor Federation
(COB). At least 15 persons were
reported injured, four with bullet
wounds.
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. - A
U.N. spokesman said yesterday
Secretary-General U Thant was
neither consulted nor informed
about the dispatch of four high
ranking U.S. officials on a fact-
finding mission to the Dominican
Republic.

Four states-Alabama, Missis-
sippi, Texas and Virginia - still
require payment of poll taxes as
voter qualification in state elec-
tions although the Constitution
bans them in elections for fed-
eral offices.
Sen. Philip A. Hart (D-Mich),
floor manager for the Voting
Rights Bill which has been un-
der debate since April 22, said he
would support the new approach.
The bill, among other things,
would suspend literacy tests as a
qualification for voter registration
and would provide for federal reg-
istrars in certain instances.
Mansfield said earlier yester-
day he planned to seek unanimous
agreement to limit debate on the
bill but laterbdropped that idea
for the time being. Prospects. for
an early vote on his new amend-
ment seemed dim.
Meanwhile, the Senate rejected
another in a series of Southern-
sponsored amendments.
It defeated by 60 to 19 a pro-
posal by Sen. Herman Talmadge
(D-Ga) to eliminate from the bill
a requirement that new state vot-
er-qualification laws be approved
by a federal court in the District
of Columbia.

By MARK KILLINGSWORTH
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING-James Farm-
er, head of the National Con-
rsof Racial Equality, indicat-
ed Sunday the next move in the
fight of civil rights groups here
for fair housing provisions will
come after a ruling by the city's
attorney on the legality of a city
law banning housing discrimina-
tion.
Speaking with reporters after
a luncheon meeting with members
of East Lansing City Council,
Farmer also said he "definitely"
would return here to work with
local civil rights groups to pub-
licize and picket against landlords
and realtors practicing discrimina-
tion should the city attorney rule
that the Michigan constitution
does not empower East Lansing
to write its own ban on local
housing bias.
A 1963 ruling by State Atty.-
Approre Plans
For Art Center
WASHINGTON (P) -- Trustees
approved final plans for the John
F. Kennedy Center for the Per-
forming Arts yesterday, even
though a million dollars is needed{
by June 30 to assure construction.
The envisioned $43-million cen-
ter would have a grand foyer to
rival Versailles' Hall of Mirrors,
plus four auditoriums for theatre,
opera, concert and cinema.
The center planners envision all
four theatres playing at once,
with a capacity audience of more
than 6,000 persons. They have
provided for a luxury restaurant
to seat 250, a cafeteria for 350 and
means for serving refreshments at
all theatres.

FRANK KELLEY JAMES FARMER

Gen. Frank Kelley, which has the
force of law until overturned by
the courts, says that all civil
rights laws and regulations must
come from the state level to be
valid.
Any local ordinances, under the
ruling, are unenforceable. A court
test of the ruling, involving Ann
Arbor fair housing ordinances, is
set for later this month.
The controversy over fair hous-
ing in East Lansing grew out of
long standing discontent among
residents of the city, mostly fac-
ulty and students at Michigan
State University, over the city's
"lily white" status.
Very Few
Prof. Robert Lee Green of the
education school and a Negro
member of the city's Human Re-
lations Commission, has said that
in the city of more than 30,000,
exclusive of MSU housing, only
five families are Negro.

prominentin obtaining 900 signa-
tures on petitions favoring an
open occupancy ordinance prior to
the Kelley ruling in 1963.
After opponents of the meas-
ure amassed an equal number of
signers, the City Council got "cold
feet," explained one council mem-
ber. And then, after the Kelley
ruling, "we decided to wait," he
said.
Student Assistance
"Thank God for the students,"
Green said. Observers here feel
that the four civil rights groups
at MSU have provided the major
-perhaps the only-force behind
the fair housing drive in East
Lansing.
They recently picketed the resi-

dents of an elderly lady who al-
legedly refused to rent a room
to a Negro.
City Councilman Max Struther,
talking with Green Sunday, ex-
pressed a similar view of the sig-
aificance of the student's role--
and added "It's always students
who aren't even from Michigan.
They always point the finger at
as but don't bother about what's
going on back home."
South in North
"It was the South minus the
Southern accent," said one observ-
er afterward of some of the coun-
cilmen's comments on "outside ag-
itators."
The city's Human Relations
Commission maintains a Neigh-
borhood G o d w ill Committee
working on the block level to
"ease possible strain resulting
from minority groups" entering a
neighborhood. The commission al-.
so talks with realtors and real es-
tate agencies, and keeps a list of
those who sell and rent on a non-
discriminatory basis.
Only two of the 13 real estate
agencies in East Lansing which
are members of the area Board of
Realtors are on the list, however.
Open Occupancy
The City Council has also pass-
ed a resolution favoring "open
occupancy,' 'and is placing adver-
tisements in classified housing sec-
tions of area newspapers saying
the site is an "open community"
and that all are welcome to settle
there in an attempt to offset what
council members admit is the city's
"bad image."

>;f
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Were

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GOOD BOOKS
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211 s. State St./
OPEN 7 NIGHTS EACH WEEK
'til 10P.M.

-I

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitl of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organiration notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, MAY 18
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar - Dean
Berry, University of Pennsylvania,
"Planning and Conducting Useful Per-
sonnel Research": Michigan Union, 8
a.m.
Council on Medical Television Meeting
--Registration, Rackham Lobby, 8 a.m.
General Notices
Soroptomist Foundation International
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring/Summer Term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Affairs by May 26, 1965. Forms
are available in Room 1011 Student
Activities Bldg.

Wellowships and Grants-in-Aid for
graduate study by women have been
announced by the Foundation. For
application and information write to
Soroptomist Federation of America,
Inc., 1616 Walnut St., Philadelphia,
Pa., 19103.
Applications for Fulbright Awards
for Graduate Study during the 1966-67
academic year are now available. The
grants are made for one academic year
and include round-trip transportation,
tuition, a living allowance and a small
stipend for books and equipment. All
grants are made in foreign currencies.
Interested students who are U.S. citi-
zens and hold an AB degree, or who
will receive such a degree by May,
1966 and who are presently enrolled in
the Univ. of Mich., should request ap-
plication forms for a Fulbright award
at the Graduate Fellowship Office,
Room 110 Rackham Bldg. The closing
date for receipt of applications is Oct.
18. Persons not enrolled in a college
or university should direct inquiries
and requests for applications to the
Institute of International Education,
U.S. Student Program, 809 United Na-
tions Plaza, New York, 10017. The last
date on which applications will be is-
sued by the Institute is Oct. 15.
Final Payment of Spring Half-Termr
Fees and first 50% of spring-summer
full term fees are due and payable on
or before May 20. Non-payment, pay-
ment of less than the required amount
or late payment will result in the as-
sessment of a delinquent penalty of $5.
In addition, a Hold Credit will be
placed against your graces if your ac-
count remains delinquent. Payments
may be made in person or mailed to
the Cashier's Office, 1015 Admin. Bldg..
before 4:30 p.m., Thurs., May 20. Mail
payments postmarked after due date,
Dial 8-6416
"A CINEMA MASTERPIECE!
A powerful, luminous
and violent
existential thriller!"
- Time Mcgozine

60
0§e Y911V §'1VOSIRgel 91; 7mendedDr}aleaning

May 20, are late and subject to pen-
alty. Identify mail payments as tui-
tion and show student number and
name.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Benzion Marks, departmental admin-
istrator, Department of Nuclear Physics,
Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel,
May 14-22.
G. A. Henrik Schaumann, chief li-
brarian, Library of Parliament, Finland,
May 15-18.
Mr. and Mrs. Vladimir Milanovic, pro-
fessor, Medical Center, Belgrade, Yugo-
slavia, May 16-18.
Geoffrey Hallam, university lecturer,
Univ. of Aston, England, May 16-20.
Alfred Morris, parliamentary private
secretary to the minister of agriculture,
fisheries and food, United Kingdom,
May 17-19.
Mr. and Mrs. Radoslav Radkovic, pro-
fessor head of sociological dept., School
of Political Sciences, Yugoslavia, May
16-June 5.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
U.S. Public Health Service, Detroit -
John Andrews will interview seniors &
grad students Wed., May 19 for Public
DIAL 5-6290
It's that wayut
whopper of;
funny wn'
CO---A- ROD -
PICIES HECHT
ma Poducwie
in COLUMBIA COLOR
Jane Fonda
Lee Marvinj
Nat King Cole
Coming Friday-
"JOHN GOLDFARB
PLEASE COME HOME"

Health Program Repres. Degrees in Gen.
Lib. Arts, Journ., Public Health, Speech,
etc. Positions located in most large
U.S. cities. Please call 764-7460, Bureau
of Appointments for appoitment.
POSITION OPENINGS:
The Grover Co., Detroit-Engineer,
BSME or EE with mech. des. exper.
Des. products & controls for pneumatic
tube systems.
City of Waterbury, Conn.-1. Sanitar-
ian, degree. in public health or sanitary
science, pref. MA plus 2 yrs. exper. in
environmental health. 2. Public Health
Educator, BA in biol., soc. sciences, or
educ. plus MA in Public Health. Appli-
cation deadline May 27.
Veterans Admin., Hines, Ill. -- Blind
rehabilitation specialist, degree in Gen.
Lib. Arts, Educ., Psych., Indust. Arts,
Therapy, etc. Gen. exper. in rehab.
work or teaching; spec. exper. in in-
structing, orientating or motivating
blind persons; or grad study will qualify
for higher rating.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAM.
TRAVEL INC.
AIRLINE
STEAMSHIP
HOTEL
CALL
665-3734
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