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May 14, 1965 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-14

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FRUDAY, MAY 14, 1965

muW. Mir.uTr_ & v 'na TT v

I_ i

in

: il1AxiriwT l Y A' TA 'U UT

PAGE FIVE

; I

OIUMIN IAN UK11:
U.S. Supports Elites

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
from 1:00 to 2:30 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 10:00 'til 11:30 A.M.

By STEPHEN BERKOWITZ
and JEFFREY GOODMAN
Third of three articles
"POLITICS makes strange bed-
fellows," but it seems to do
this consistently.
Thus, to no one's great surprise,
two old "friends" of the United
States in Latin America-General
Alfredo Stroessner, the military
ictator of Paraguay and General
Iumberto Castelo Branco, the
nilitary dictator of Brazil-turned
.p last week between the sheets of
' "resident Johnson's crusade for
lemocracy in the Dominican Re-
)ublic-
They, of course, 'were offering
troops to defend democracy
against the Dominicans.
Other Latin Americans were not
quite so pleased. The governments
)f Venezuela, Chile and even
Viexico registered serious doubts
.bout our actions.
THE JOHNSON crusade is, of
curse, being waged against that
.efarious enemy of us all-the
'Evil Communist Conspiracy"-
which, by dint of its superior
capacity for deviousness, had been
able in the spice of a few days
o take over "control" of a popu-
ar democratic revolution which,
In all probability, was planned
and launched from American soil
(Puerto Rico).
Further, this "Communist-
-lirected" revolution was, appar-
ently, being led by Dominican
military officers trained in the
United States.
How insidious can you get!
This sort of thing comes as no
irprise to people accustomed to
iding Communists under their
ed,, but for the rest of us, it has
bout itself the unpleasant smell
f the CIA.
Those familiar with the recent
listory of Latin America are
'amiliar with the CIA's last foray
nto the real world-the Bay of
Pigs invasion. This didn't turn out
very well, surely, but the CIA was
certain it knew the source of its
troubles: the Communists.
THE COMMUNISTS, it "rea-
soned," were involved in both
Cuba and the Dominican Republic;
ergo, they ought to be treated in
the same way. "Only this time
we're going to win by using enough
force," they said to themselves.
,Thus the world was treated to
the spectacle of seeing 30,000
orth American troops-a number
equivalent to one and a half per
eent of the population of the
country - charge ashore in the
Dominican Republic.
The rationale given by the
Johnson administration for this
seemingly absurd action-a ra-
tionale provided by the CIA no
doubt-was that "58 known Com-
munists" became involved in the
Dominican revolution just as it
seemed likely to win.
ALL THIS PROVED, however,
was that the CIA was doing its
homework: everyone knew there
was a Communist Party in the
Dominican Republic (everyone
also should know that it support-
ed Trujillo) and that it threw its
support (?) behind the revolution
when it seemed likely that Tru-
jillo's successors were about to
get, booted out.
How, precisely, the CIA dis-
"overed this secret information
tas not been disclosed. They might
ave obtained it from the rebels
temselves-who openly admitted
at the CP had changed horses
mid-stream.
t )f course, Johnson did not
that he "held in (his) hand a
Sof the names of, 58 members
the Communist Party etc."-
it the antecedents of his mode
policy making were clear none-
aeless.

ALEXANDER ORLOV, one of
te chiefs of the Soviet intelli-
ince apparatus before World War
, wrote in his "Handbook of
atelligence and .Guerrilla War-
are" about two opposing "con-
eptions" of intelligence work
(the U.S. and Soviet): one which
)perated primarily on the basis
Af "educated" guesses and pre-
ictions, the other which seeks in-
ormation directly from secret
sources.
The failure of the first method
of and by itself (Orlov outlines
some of the reasons it fails in his
book), is clearly demonstrated by
the Dominican incident. In the
absence of any direct understand-
tnbg of the functional role of these E
men in the movement-a place
which does not seem to have been
great-the "fact" of Communist
participation alone is inconclusive
and misleading. In this instance,
>ur guess was somewhat less than
ducated.
With this kind of "intelligence"
aetwork serving the purpose of
gathering the "information" which
-lets us Justify the, directions ofV
our foreign policy (rather than
the direction being taken from
;he information), the U.S. is in-v

been one of repression and re-
action.
IN SOME PLACES and at cer-
tain times in the past, the precise
composition of these "elites" has
changed somewhat.
But the relationship these elites
enjoy to the rest of the popula-
tion of the country has remained
the same.
In an atmosphere of social rev-
olution, with non-Westerners
promising to assume an increas-
ing role in the conduct of world
affairs, the U.S. risks calling down
upon itself the deserved approba-
tion of the majority of the earth's
people.
The intervention by the U.S. in
the Dominican rebellion--against
a movement attempting to re-
establish constitutional democracy
and give expression to needs and
desire for real social-economic re-
form-this intervention cannot
but place the U.S. on the side of
reaction and colonialism in the+
eyes of the peoples of all of the
underdeveloped world.;
Those governments which are
established, strong, conciliatory
toward our vast enconomic hold-
ings in Latin America and our
peculiar conceptions of democratic1
self-determination, those govern-
ments which, in a word, are part;
of the aristocratic, oligarchic
powers which depend strongly on
our economic interests in main-j
taining a general economic andf
political stranglehold and which1
therefore protect those interests-
these oppressive and economically
and politically reactionary govern-
ments we perceive "pragmatically"-
as our best stake.
Whatever threatens them there-1
fore threatens us, for we are con-f
cerned not with real democracy orc
real progress but with stability-
as long as it can keep up thec
guise of progress, making gran--
diose motions full of sound andf

fury whose insignificance is
little real consequence to us.

of

IN THIS LIGHT, it is an ad-
mirable restraint that North Viet
Nam, China and Russia have
shown regarding our bombing of
Hanoi's military and industrial in-
stallations. For we have not only
intervened unilaterally and im-
perialistically in sending- thou-
sands of troops and millions of
dollars to defeat a primarily
southern-based popular liberation
movement.
IF THE HYPOCRITICAL juxta-
position of our proclamations and
our deeds is galling, it is ironic,
that the latter inevitably subvert
the former.
The constant reminder that U.S.
power will be and has been used
to subvert liberating and nation-
alistic movements, that the U.S.
is incapable and afraid of aiding,
in a true spirit of cooperation any
of the multifarious progressive
revolutions which we stereotype
and dismiss as Communist--these
unambiguous signs cannot help
but inflame, crystallize and
strengthen the legitimate move-
ments we are illegitimately at-
tempting to stifle.
So it is a vicious circle of more
and more "holy" colonial inter-
ventions to shore up a declining
prestige in a world which, turning
revolutionary, is simultaneously
and unnecessarily turning against
us because we cannot accept it
and cooperate with it.
THE COMING YEARS, with
only the details of future VietI
Nam's, future Dominican Repub-
lics left to be filled in, is clear:
armed clashes which the peoples
of the world will increasingly see
as an unsuccessfully-veiled neo-
colonialism, nuclear confrontations
-and, unless we are lucky, the
final blows.

FOR RENT
URGENT-Wanted 2 girls to share apt.
for 4 for fall. Call either Barb at
517-224-4103 or Susan at 313-338-1391
co llect.C C0
FOR GRAD MEN -- Efficiency rooms,
low rate. Inquire at 917 Mary. C19
ROOMS FOR GIRLS for summer in new
professional sorority house. Call 662-
1017. C21
AVAILABLE AUG. 15 & FOR SUMMER
SUBLET-Large 3 or 4 person apts.
Also large furn. rooms. NO 2-2197 or.
NO 8-8601. C17
SINGLE ROOM - Mature graduate
woman, kitchen privileges, cool quiet
apt. Call 764-7465. C5
LARGE STUDIO & ROOMS FOR RENT.
$22 and $12 per week. Avail. now.
Also basement apt, avail. June 24.
Close to campus, 701 S. Forest. NO
3-2108. C18
ROOM IN large, quiet, private home
with refrig., linens furn. $11 per week.
NO 2-9806 after 5:30 p.m. 07
FOR ALL OR PART OF THE SUMMER
-Mod., air-cond., furn. apts. for
groups of 2 or 3. Also 3-man apts. for
fall. Call between 10 and 1 or 4 and 6.,
663-8866. C15

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
. 70
.85
1.00

SPECIAL
FIVE-DAY
RATE
3.00
3.75
4.35

Figure 5 average words to a line
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 2:30 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone 764-0557

NO LEASE REQUIRED
Large studio, unfurn., $70/mo.,
cludes all utilities. 663-7268.

in-

'CALLOWAYS':
Family Entertainment
Wholesome, Tiring

3 RM. FURN. APT. Close to campus and
downtown. Mod., clean, garage,
laundry facilities, TV antenna, large
sun porch, utilities except electricity.
$145 mo. NO 3-5532 after 6 p.m. 08
ATTRACTIVE, 2 bdrm., large furn.
apt. Piano, garage. Near campus.
Heat, water included. Grad women
students, married couplesrpreferred.
$150 mo. Call NO 5-4740 or see 1523
S. Univ. C5
HOUSE FOR RENT--3 bdrm., minutes
from campus. Rent $200 or best bid.
Call 662-7384. 09
CLOSE TO CAMPUS and downtown,
avail. after May 15. 2 bdrm. furn.
apt., mod. and clean, off-street park-
ing, laundry faclties, TV antenna,
utilities except electricity. $135 ma.
NO 3-5532 after 6 p.m. C10
REDUCED
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL
1 bdrm. apt, with study. Very attrac-
tive, modern furn. Avail. now and
fall. $80 mo. Cali NO 5-0925 or NO
2-7992. C3
4-MAN APARTMENT
Modern, furnished 4-man apartment
available now for either part of sum-
mer, whole summer, or full year.
Good location, off-street parking,
garbage disposal, full basement in
addition to kitchen. $31.25 per man
during summer. $37.50 during school
year. Call Ed, 662-1860, 5:30-7 p.m.
C12
ROOMS FOR MEN
$20 per month
TV Lounge, Air conditioned
Complete Snack Kitchen
Call 8-9593
Cl
FURN. 3 bdrm house, ceramic bath,
fireplace, newly decorated. Hill-,
Division area. Summer $180 mo. Fall'
$220 mo. Call NO 3-6528. C3I

USED CARS
TR 3, 1960, SHINY black, 38,000 miles.
$1095. CALL NO 2-8895. N9
TRIUMPH TR-4, 1964 roadster. Clean.
14,500 miles. Never raced. Four on
the floor, wire wheels, radio, heater,
windshield washer. Green, black
top. Racing stripes, seatrbelts. One
owner. $2500. Can be seen at 523
Neff Road, Grosse Point. Call TU
2-8535 for appointment. N3
ALPHA-1963 Sprint Speciale. One own-
er. Mint condition. Best offer. 3150
Morgan Road. N1
MGB 1964
AM-FM radio. NO 5-4620. N7
MGB '63. Blue Roadster, wire wheels,
luggage rack, radio. 665-5620. N8
'59 OLDS, 4 door station wagon. Call
NO 3-3547. N2
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI'S Galore!
LEVI'S -SLIM-FITS-$4.25
"White," and 5 Colors
For "Guys and Gals"
Cord. SLIM-FITS-$5.98
LEVI'S STA-PREST PANTS
Never Needs Ironing
Asst'd. Colors-$6.98
S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI'S
For Gals and Guys
"White" and Colors-$5.98

SUMMER SUBLET
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted NOW -
Cheap, air-cond., mod. apt., 815 S.
State, Apt. 8. Call 663-7406. U18
4 RM. FURN. APT., main floor, avail,
now 'til Aug. 20, washing facilities.
Also 3 rm. furn. apt. avail. Aug. 15.
NO 3-4325. U16
SWIMMING POOL, lounge, mod., air-
condi., 1 or more girls to share. Bar-
gain! 2 blks. from campus. 663-1062.
FURN. APT., convenient, 1 man, June
1-Aug. 24. Sacrifice. Call Dick, 764-
4285 days; 665-7637, 5-7 p.m. U17
MALE ROOMMATE for air cond. apt.
Call 2-1477 eves., 6-7. U2
STUDENTS-Choose your own hours!
Scholarship offered! Call 761-2779
8-11 a.m. H7
GIRL WANTED to share apartment.
Call 2-9785 after 5:00. U12
SUMMER SUBLET-2 blks. from cam-
pus. Furn. for 2, until Aug. 19. Call
665-5582 after 5:00. U8
ON CAMPUS-Mod. 3-rm. fully furn.
air-cond., garbage disposal, sun ter-
race, avail, now or June 1. Call 665-
4289 after 5:00. U13
5 RM. DOWNSTAIRS furn. apt. 1207
Willard. Avail. now. 665-3446. U14
MOD. FURN. apt. for 4-Air-cond. Heat-
ed swimming pool. Call 761-2283. U9
SUMMER ONLY-Near campus, 5 room,
furn. for 3 or 4. 453-6006. U15
REDUCED FOR THE SUMMER
Furnished and unfurnished for 1-4
people. Call 663-7268. U7
2ND SESSION, for 2, 3 or 4, new air
cond. apt. Bargain summer rates.
Call 668-8723, 665-8330 or 665-2689. U3
4 PEOPLE to sublease apt. May 5 to
Sept. 1. Furn and air cond. Call
HU 3-6100, ext. 3960. US
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS, AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
MISCELLANEOUS
WORRIED about Viet Nam? The Do-
minican Republic got you down?
Your bridge game gone sour? Forget
your problems with goodies from
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
open every night 'til 12

HELP WANTED
TWO STUDENTS-Room in exchane
or 7 hours work per week. Call NO
3-4740 and ask for Peggy. H12
ANIMAL CARETAKER need. MINIMUM
$1.50 hr. 20-25 hrs./week. 764-0438. H9
TEACHER-Beth Israel Nursery, Half
days, starting Sept., experience de-!
sirable, mail resume to Mrs. Linde-
nauer, 1414 Argyle. H10
PART TIME-Young woman to work at
Univ. Hospital about 1 hr. daily.
Ideal for someone living in Univ.
Terrace or vicinity. Do not phone
Hasp. Please write time of day avail.
and describe any previous work ex-
perience to Box No. 7, 420 Maynard,
Ann Arbor. H5
GRAD. RN Wanted to work in mod.,
air-cond. office beginning in July,
located on Greenfield Rd. betwn. 6
and 7 MIle Road in Detroit. Practice
limited to allergy. Must live in Detroit
area. Dr. Leonard Schreier, NO 2-8232.
H11
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive; $7 and $10 for Rh
negative. Hours: Mon., 9-4; Tues.,
9-4; Fri., 1-7, 18-21 yrs. old need
parent's permission. Detroit Blood
Service, new location, 404 W. Mich-
igan, Ypsilanti, Mich. H29
POLICE PATROLMEN
Starting Salary-$505 per month
Top pay for patrolmen-$644 per mo.
If you are a U.S. citizen, 21-35 years
old, at least 5'9" and 150 pounds, have
good vision (at least 20-30 in each eye
without glasses), have no police rec-
ord, and are willing to submit to a
polygraph examination, you may be
interested in joining our top notch
police department. Merit system, com-
petitive examinations for promotion,
excellent training available.
Applications may be obtained by
writing to the
Skokie Police Department
8333 Lincoln Avenue
Skokie, Illinois
H8
ROOM AND BOARD
CO-OPS are a good place to eat this
summer. Board $11 per wk. Room
& board $17 per week. Join for 1 or
both terms. Contact Intter-Cooper-
ative Council, 2546 SAB. Call 668--
6872. El
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to BOSTON, May 14-16.
Chris Cohen, 764-9087 or 665-4537. G
FOR SALE
SELLING OUT
All unfinished furniture. Dastic reduc-
tions. Save money while stock lasts.
A few of our specials: Desk and chair,
$14.95; 3-drawer chests, $9.95, 4-draw-
er chest, $11.95, Record cabinets,
bookcases, corner, china cabinets,
bookcase headboards. Come in and be
convinced. Michigan Woodcraft, 113
S. 4th Ave. B4
21-INCH Console TV. Admiral. Good
condition. Call 665-7056. B3
BUY AND SELL THROUGH
The Clearing House
A listing service for privately
owned articles.
Autos, motorcycles, bikes, T.V.,
Hi-Fi's, furniture, cameras, etc.
PHONE 662-6574, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING DONE in my home. Mrs. Carol
Fox, 476-5184. J18

Meet the Right Person
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of personality
appraisal and an IBM system, is to
introduce unmarried persons to others
with compatible backgrounds, inter-
ests and ideals. Interviews by ap.
pointment. Phone 662-4867.
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
RELIABLE PARTY FOR
ADDED INCOME
FOR PART OR FULL TIME WORK
WE SECURE LOCATIONS
FOR TESTERS
Male or female, wanted for this area
to service route for Sylvania & R.C.A.
television and radio tubes sold
through our latest modem method
free self-service tube testing and
merchandising units. Will not inter-
fere with your present employment.
To qualify you must have $1,476.60
to $2,953.20 cash available immed-
iately for inventory and equipment,
investment secured. Car, 5 spare hours
weekly, could net up to $6,000.00 per
year in your spare time, should be
able to start at once. This company
will extend financial assistance to
full time if desired. Do not answer
unless fully qualified for time and
investment. Income should start im-
mediately. Business is set up for you.
Selling, soliciting, or experience is
not necessary. For personal inter-
view in your city - please include
your Phone Number and WRITE
U. S. ELECTRONICS CORP.
6267 Natural Bridge, Pine Lawn 20, Mo.
PERSONAL
2 GUYS need cook for dinner-not
lunch. Call Fred, 665-2341 between
3 and 5 p.m. Fl
LOVABLE LABRADOR free to the right
home. Have moved to the city, dog
prefers room to run. Has shots. Call
662-4177. F10
RENT YOUR TV from NEJAO
GE and Zenith portables for only $10
per month. FREE service and de-
livery. Phone 662-5671 NOW. F
JUDY'S LONELY! She needs lots and
lots of people to help her on the
Michigan Daily Business Staff. Come
in and see her any day. F14
WAKE UP SERVICE -- Have your
phone ringEat any designated time-
day or night-LOW RATES, DON'T
BE LATE FOR CLASS OR WORK-
AGAIN. TELEPHONE ANSWERING
SERVICE, 665-8871 (24 hours). F42
AUSTIN DIAMOND-"The best buy on
an Engagement ring in Ain.Arbor."
1209 S. University, 663-7151.

At the State Theatre

BIKES AND SCOOTERS

WITH THE typical Disney menagerie of wild animals and the
typical wholesome-but-troubled teenager, "Those Calaways" rep-
resents all that it good and bad about the typical Disney film.
Situated in the scenic Vermont countryside, the story revolves
round the familiar themes of a boy and his dog, a boy and his "Paw,"
a boy and his girl, in that order. If that were the extent of it, the
picture could be considered appealing, if not enthralling.
However, the plot thickens; while the viewer moves smoothly
through the young hero's first encounters with the dangers of
nature and romance, he oozes rather uncomfortably along for
another hour while "greedy, heartless capitalists" attempt to disrupt
the lives of the villagers, content in the rusticity of their New
England town.
All this is complicated by foreclosed mortgages and "Paw's"
consuming interest in liquor and wild geese.
PERHAPS in an humanitarian effort to make the two corny
hours a little more bearable for parents, Disney felt compelled to
include a touch of painful realism--"Paw" wincingly sets his own
broken leg, ermines get eaten by wolverines, "Maw" and "Paw"
even have fights. But they make up, of course, and no one dies
in the end--except the ermine.
If the human element of realism is squelched by the mediocre
acting of most of the cast, the wild-life scenes are at least partial
compensation. Hopefully, though, none of the children in the
audience were alarmed by -the connection between "maw's" ermine
cape and the furry little friend they had seen scampering about in
the snow a few moments before,
DOTTED WITH minor miracles which set one's teeth on edge
but which seem not only accepted, but even required by the younger
set, "Those Calaways" is good viewing for the youngster sharp
enough to comprehend the somewhat gluey plot; the story is moving
and at times even mildly humorous.
-CAROL MEAD
'DUNES':
Many Implications
Brought to Mind
At the Campus Theatre
"WOMAN IN THE DUNES" is a tautly constructed, brilliantly
edited morality piece. The plot is simple and offbeat. A man is
offered shelter for the night with a woman, who lives at the bottom of
a sand pit, only to discover the next morning that he is a prisoner.
The trapped guest then attempts numerous escapes only to fail each
time and be returned to the woman of the dunes.
Most of the structure of the film revolves around the struggles
between the man and the sand, and between the two individuals
themselves.
The number of possible analogies to contemporary civilization
and its ills are numerous. And as with any serious work of art, the
interpretations of the analogies and their implications will differ in
respect to the individual regarding it.
THE GREATEST VALUE the film offers is not a thematic allu-
sion to Modern Man or to Man's eternal battle with nature. The real
worth concerns the absorbing ways in which the film develops and
grows as an artistic unity.
The direction is compact and frugal; each shot of the constantly
drifting sands, each frenzied moment of time spent by the two people
within the sand pit are carefully interwoven with each other to pro-
vide a delicate pattern of emotional and psychological tension, both
within the film and in respect to the audience.

LEVI JACKETS
Blue Denim-$5.49
"White"-$5.98

LEVI'S Superslim's-$4.98
LEVI'S Dungarees-$4.49
TURTLENECKS-$1.69
(15 Colors)
Open Mon. & Fri. Nites
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

'61 LAMBRETTA LI 150, $175 or b
offer. Call 665-5671.
1964 YAMAHA, 250 cc, 5 speed. $4
663-2840 or 663-3683.
HONDA NOW! Buy, reserve, or L
away before the spring rush. 24,
delivery onrall 12 popular 1965 m
els. 30 or more to choose from. E
them at HONDA OF ANN ARBC
1906 Packard Rd., 665-9281.
SEE IT NOW-The '65 Yamaha w
the revolutionary new oil injectl
system. No more fuss or muss.
NICHOLSON MOTOR SALES
223 S. First
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORII
RENT A TRUCK
Pickups, panels, stakes, and vans
59 Ecorse Rd., Ypsilanti, Mob.

iest
Z3
475.
Z2
ay-
hr.
od-
See
DR,
Ith
ion
ES
s.

418 E. WASHINGTON
On Campus-Half Block from Frieze
WASHINGTON
MANOR
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL, 1965
Apts. for 2 and 3 Men
ONE BEDROOM & STUDIO APART-
MENTS, LUXURIOUSLY FURNISHED,
AIR - CONDITIONED, BALCONIES,
SOUND-PROOF CONSTRUCTION,

I

59 Ecorse Rd., Ypsilanti, Mich.

DINE OUT

THIS
WEEKEND

<i

FOR APPOINTMENT
CALL NO 8-6906

06

TAKE YOUR MOM TO
Od ileidelbe
211-213 N. Main St. 668-9753

NEW CARS
EUROPEAN CARS, I NC.
NEW CARS AND SERVICE
506 E. Michigan, Ypsilanti
HU 2-2175
Washtenaw County's only
authorized V.W. Dealer
U A

s

vvv i r .e~

Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays
FRONTIER BEEF BUFFET
Cafeteria Open 7 Days
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30 A.M.-8:00 P.M.
Friday and Saturday until 8:30 P.M.

71 VIA GINME

State Street on Campus RESTAURANT
Weekend Special D
1/ BARBECUED 4
Barbecue Sauce, French Fried
Potatoes, Creamy Cole Slaw, Roll
and Butter, Coffee, Tea or Milk
7 A.M.-8 P.M. Daily

)inner
CH1

Phone NO 3-3441
CKEN
$ 45
ClsdTedy

SUBJECTS
WANTED
for PAID
Psychological
Experiments

f.. _. :, " it / . -_ cV "' . r . " /.A..\ " - : / _.. ' .r''.1 .

2333 E. STADIUM

663-9165

"Roast Beef at its Finest"

11

Call
764-2583

I

DEPEN DABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.

BRING A FRIEND
You'll both love
the
Delicious Pancakes

For your dining pleasures ..
Our menu features:
ELEGANT SEAFOOD NEWBERGS
lobster, crabmeat, shrimp in our own
zesty sherry newberg sauce
VEAL SCALLOPINE, MARSALA
sauteed veal in a rich marsala wine sauce
FRESH BROOK TROUT
from Snake River, sauteed with a delicate dressing
FILET OF RED SNAPPER
broiled tooa turn and topped with a delicate
pinat Chardonnoy wine sauce
* BROILED LIVE MAINE LOBSTER
U.S. PRIME STEAKS
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF

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