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August 24, 1965 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


T -AGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN I)ATIN

TTTEIRDAT- ATTnTTqIP %A. 169.9

1?AGE FOVR TIlE MICIIJc.AX DAILY

I I.Gi31~i, ~uv n~l,4%. t Ib

Cagers Set

ecr ds-t Leave omething for

'66

By PETE DILORENZI But the outlook isn't complete-
ly black. Back from last year's
Any basketball team which loses starting team is Captain-elect 011-
rdayers the caliber of Capt. Larry ver Darden, a 6'7', 230-pound for-
d eonng, center Bill Buntin and ward who caught fire midway
nrd George Pomey from its through last season and then on
tig five is bound to have a was able to provide high and con-
t tgh time improving its record sistent scoring help in addition
d the last season. to his always ferocious play under
Add to that the fact that last the boards.
rear's team went all the way to
the final round of the NCAA tour- Best in Country
narnent, and it becomes clear The other returning starter
that Coach Dave Strack's Wolver- from last year's team is only
ine cagers have their work cut out Cazzie Russell, perhaps the best
for them in the coming season. college player in the country. A

first-team All-American as a juni-
ior, Russell broke his own sopho-
more single-season Michigan scor-
ing record of 670 points by pour-
ing 692 points through the hoops
as a junior.
Russell, taking 556 shots Irom
the floor and hitting on 270 of
them, added 152 free throws 1or
lhis 692 point total and a final
season average per game of 25,6.
He hit 340 of his points in the
Big Ten season, but finished see-
ond in scoring to Dave Schellhasm'
of Purdue for the ;,econd straight

year. As a sophomore, Schellhase
hit 370 to Russell's 366, but both
finished far behind Ohio State's
Garry Bradds, who scored a total
of 474 points.
Last year, Schellhase finished
41 points ahead of Russell, putting
on a big scoring rush in the fin-
al game of the season with Russell
o1 the bench with a fever.
Jinng Russell and Darden this
year will be veterans Craig Dill,
Jim Myers, John Clawson, John
Thompson, Dan Brown and Den-
nis Biankey.

'Al~lon e

---

... to Todd's and the
University of Michigan

Dill, a 6'10". 210-pound jun-
ior from Saginaw who was rated
as one of the outstanding sopho-
more prospects in the country by
one of the pre-season forecasts last
fall, will take on the unenviable1
task of filling Buntin's shoes atI
center. Understandably he did nod
see much action as a starter last
year, but he did manage to please
Coach Strack in his frequent ap-
pearances as a reserve. Dill is
also the possessor of one of the
team's best foul-shooting eyes.
Myers, a 6"7" senior who hasI
seen much action over the pastI
two seasons as Michigan's "sixth
man," will probably have the in-
side track on Tregoning's old for-
ward position. Myer's best shot is
a soft left-handed jumper from
20 feet out. He will be challenged
for the open forward's spot by
6'4" John Clawson and 6'5" Dan
Brown, both of whom saw some
action as substitutes last year.
Other Guard
The other guard spot will be up
for grabs this season, much as it
was at the outset of last season.-
John Thompson, who started at
the position in theearly part of
last season, will have to fight off
junior dribbling-specialist Dennis
Bankey and sophomore jumping-
jack Jim Pitts.
Other freshmen who will now
make their presence on the varsity
felt are Gary Bowman, 6'4", Mark'
Fritz, 6'5", and Bill Thomas, 6'5".
On its way to the NCAA play-1
offs last season, Michigan smashed
its own conference scoring rec-
ord as well as the old conference
record by scoring an even total of {
1300 points in 14 games for a per1
game average of 92.9. The old
team record for total points on the
season <conference, non-confer-
ence and playoff) of 2,420 also
fell before the Blue onslaught.a
Last year's Wolverines scored a
grand total of 2,526 points.
-Most Won
The 13 conference games and
the 24 full-season games won by;
the Wolverines are the most ever
won by a Michigan basketball

This set the stage for a Michi-,
gan-Princeton rematch. Ever since
the first Wolverine-Tiger encoun-
ter at the Holiday Tournament in
December, in which Michigan
roared from behind to win 80-79
after Princeton's All-Everything
Bill Bradley fouled out with over
four minutes left, the Tigers had
been itching for another shot at
the Wolverines.
But Michigan, with Buntin
scoring 22 points and Russell pour-
ing in 28, had too much for the
sentimental favorites, and even
though Bradley led all scorers with
29 points the Wolverines walked
away in the second half for a 93-
76 triumph.
Second Game
In the second game, UCLA beat
Wichita 108-89, setting the stage
for the dream game in the finals.
For the first 10' minutes of
that game, the Wolverines looked
unbeatable. They roared from a
four-point deficit to a seven point
lead, 20-13. But the UCLA press
began to have its anticipated ef-
fect.
The Wolverines didn't substitute
as frequently as they would have
liked. They found themselves mak-
ing too many turnovers, nervously
tried to correct this, made even
more, and got more nervous. By
halftime, the Bruins had a com-
fortable 47-34 lead, mainly the re-
sult of an eight-point spurt by the
explosive Kenny Washington just
before the close of the half.
As the second half opened, the
big question was whether the Wol-
verines could come up with the

A

rally they would need to overcoint
the Bruin lead and get back into
the game. They couldn't. The zone
press completely cracked the Wol-
verines' composure.
The Bruins broke up pass after
Michigan pass and bided their
time on offense-until the dart-
ing phantom, Gail Goodrich, could
get inside the foul line to score
the 27 points he tallied in his
phenomenal second half perform-
ance.

CAZZIE RUSSELL

BILL BUNTIN
hands of Nebraska, a stunning 74-

Then the inevitable late Michi-
gan rally began. With the Bruins
ahead 71-51, the Wolverines be-
gan stealing passes too-and com-
pleting some-until, at the buzzer,
they had narrowed the gap to 11
points, 91-80.
The 1964-65 Wolverines had
battled as far as they were able.
They had made their history. And
improvement now has to come
from the new Wolverines of 1965-
66.

We're not trying to be stuffy or sizobbish-but
don't come to Todd's if you're looking for the saue
conventional clothing you can buy ii other stores!

BUT! If you are bored with the
Todd's is the only store in town for
have been created jest for Todd's.
Plan to make Todd's your clothing store, We
know college students and we know what
they like. We are here to serve you with the
finest in men's clothing, in the newest style

con ention al.
you. T odd's styles,
8000 PAIRS
of CONTINENTAL
and IVY PANTS
to choose from..,
priced from 4.98 ino
Sta Prest

73 upset; St. John's, 75-74 in the
New York Holiday Tournament;
Ohio State after the Big Ten title
had been clinched and with Caz-
zie Russell out with a fever; and,
of course ,the final game of the
NCAA playoffs in Portland, Ore.,
when UCLA humbled the Wolver-
ines 91-80.
Between the Ohio State and
UCLA losses, the Wolverines
notched NCAA victories in Lex-
ington, Ky., over Dayton and its
7' center, Henry Finkel, and Van-
derbilt, with Clyde Lee ,most val-
uable player in the Mid-East Re-
gional Tournament.
In the meantime, Princeton
pulled an "impossible'' upset, rout-
ing highly-favored Providence 109-
69 in the Eastern Regionals at
College Park, Md.

RUGBY TO SKY DIVING:
Myriad of Minor Sports
Seeks Eager Enthusiasts

i
,!
gt
s
'-' ;

By MARC SPINRAD

team.
The+
year's

only losses suffered by last1
Wolverines came at the'

fl

ti

I-

Wolverine Season Statistics

I

creations.
To

Levi's available
in all styhes
al sizes.
- s
: the store yc
1209 SOi

Games
Caze Russell. g l5
""ll "untn, c 26
Oliver Darden, f 26
Larry 'rregoning, 1f ?6
John T'1homnpson, g 2:3
George Putney. g 26
Jim l ur-. c 25
Craig Dili, c 19
Torn Ludwig, g 112
John Clawson, g 16
Dan Browi, g
Van Tillotson, f 4
E Demik Isankey, g 12
I Charle, Adams, g ;3
I M ICHIGAN 'TOTALS ..s 26
Opponents' Totals 26
*Totals do not include NCAA

FG FGA
251 521
208 427
138 299
125 276
52 118
82 181
43 132
31 64
4 15
17 42
0 1
o 6
1) 1
952 2090
811 1847
playolfs

1T
136
112
57
42
16
35
14
25
4
6
1
455
407

F TA RB
168 198
145 303
91 233
61 196
2:3 . ,29
54 99
23 110
36 51
4 r
10 23
3 8
5 4
6 5
0 6
629 1432
594 1106

PF
55
is
80
65
43
54
32
25
8
18
5
0
469
522

Pts.
638
528
333
29'2
120
199
100
87
12
40
3
2
5
0
2359
2029

Ave.
25.5
20.3
12.8
11.2
5.2
7.6
4.0
4.5.
1.1
2.5
0.5
0.4
0.0
90.7
78.0

Michigan isn't all big-time
sports. For those whose tastes lean
to bizarre and exotic-or just less
major-athletic pursuits, there are
clubs on campus tailor-made to
suit every interest.
For those who enjoy rugged
contact action, there are rugby
and soccer. The rugby club had
a 14-game schedule last season,
facing teams from Chicago,
Southwest Ontario, Notre Dame
and Indiana, among others.
Through the spring, it compiled a
8-1-2 record.
There are two soccer clubs, an
undergraduate club and a squad
open to both grads and under-
grads. The former played a six-
game schedule last spring against
teams fielded by Bowling Green,
Toledo, Kent State, Wooster and
others. An eight-game schedule is
planned for the fall.
The second soccer club plays in
the International Soccer League
(a Michigan intermural league).
Lacrosse Club
A lacrosse club was formed last
spring to offer still another sport-
ing alternative. Along with soccer
and rugby, the lacrosse squad
plays at Wines Field, and both
spectators and participants are
welcome.
The manly art of self defense
is represented in three of its
more popular forms by the boxing,

judo and karate clubs. The clubs
have about 30 members. apiece
and usually meet twice a week.
The boxing club is under the tu-
telage of varsity coach Les Phil-
bin, and the judo and karate
teams engage in interclub com-
petition.
This year a group of enthusiasts
formed a cycling club. The club
offers interclub races and several
members entered local open meets.
Ski and Sailing Clubs
Two of the most popular ath-
letic organizations are the ski and
sailing clubs. The sailing club
owns several sloops, and takes
trips to Whitmore Lake every
weekend in the spring and fall.
The ski club takes one major trip
each year (over the Christmas
break) and several weekend trips
to local areas.
The newest campus club is the
sky diving club. Members jump
every Saturday and Sunday at
Richmond Field in Gregory, Mich-
igan.
There are also many smaller
clubs. These clubs meet anywhere
from once a month to several
times a week. They include the
bowling club, weight lifting club,
handball club, rifle and pistol
clubs and fencing club.
Those interested in joining any
of these clubs may contact either
Earl Riskey or R. J. Grambeau at
the Intramural Bldg.

a

tu read about in "Playboy"
UTH UNIVEtISiTY

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*1

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and

Al

EVERYONE

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' p y7 ..
:;'r'.
, ' :

ANN

ARBOR

SHOS

AT

FRESHMEN!
After Preregistering
Drop in and reserve your
books for fall courses.
AVOID THE RUSH
Books guaranteed to be official text

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