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August 24, 1965 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE V EE 4

TUESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE.

-:

Can
(Continued from Page 2)
to be one of the top ground-gai
ing outfits in the nation.
Last season the. junior tackl
Tom Mack and Charlie Kin
started out with little experien
but under the ,guidance of li
coach' Tony Mason they turn
in top performances. Mason, w
earned a permanent niche in W
verine football folklore by sho
ing up for the Ohio State ga
last year in shirt sleeves and ba
ball cap, a la Woody. Hayes, ho:
to get the same results w
guards Bailey and Keating, w
have been defensive specialists
to now.
Elliott is, at his zenith of
timism in saying, "Switch
these two to the offense v
greatly strengthen the line."
Desire to Hit
Bailey weighs only 190, but
cording to Elliott he has a strc
desire to hit people.
Keating, a 226-pound sen

They
won the Myer Morton Trophy as
in- the most improved player during
spring practice. He's the younger
les, brother of ex-Wolverine tackle
es, Tom Keating, who is now toiling
ce, in the pro ranks.
ine
ied Kines and Mack will be return-
ho ing to add their own special
ol- touch of finesse. Kines, a barrel-
w- chested 230 pounder, is used to
me playing under Mason, who was
se- his head coach in high school.
pes Major Leaguer
ith Mack's father is Ray Mack, a
ho former major league second base-
upman. Tom explains that as a
youngster he wasnalways "Ray
OP- Mack's kid." But the gridder's line
ing play is turning the 'elder Mack
will into "Tom's old man."
In the middle of these four, a
three-way battle is shaping up for
ac- center. The contestants are icon-
ong verted tackle Jerry Danhof and
sophomores Paul D'Eramo and
ior, Joe Dayton.

Be

First

in

10

To

Do

It

Again?

Michigan doesn't pass often,
but when the situation arises,
6'5", 230-pounder Steve Smith
and 6'2", 190-pound Craig Kirby
will be ready. As the weights in-
dicate, Kirby will be the spread
end while Smith will be in tight.
Experience
Both saw extensive action last
year. Smith was a sometimes
starter, and Kirby was John
Henderson's understudy. Speedy
Henderson has graduated, but
Kirby should do nicely. He's.
skinny and slow, but has magnifi-
cent hands and specializes in the
short sideline pass.
If this outfit goes all the way,
it will be without the help of the
schedule-makers. Elliott lists Ohio

State, Michigan State, Purdue and
Minnesota as the prime contend-
ers and Michigan plays them all.
The Wolverines might be es-
pecially anxious to play the Pur-
due team in this year's home-
coming battle since the Boiler-
makers were the only team to
defeat Michigan last year, and
that by the slim margin of 21-20.
Near-Upset
Minnesota also almost upset'
the Michigan applecart, and it
took a desperate final-minute
goal line stand to emerge a 19-12
winner.
The victory over Michigan State
was the first since 1955 and the
Spartans would like to prevent,

another for at least nine more
years. For the record, the two{
institutions of higher learning do
not like each other, primarily
because Michigan men don't con-
sider MSU an institution of high-
er learning.
The game against Ohio StateI
decided the Big Ten champion-
ship, and Buckeye coach Hayes
brooded after the defeat. The'
OSU-Michigan game is always theI
last of the year and is a bitter'
rivalry. Hayes would love to see
a similar situation this year-I
only with different results.
Previewing the season, Elliott
sighs, "I'm a little uneasy." But,
so are Michigan's opponents. I

Wolverine Season Football Statistics

1

SCORING
TD CK ClPR FG TI'
Timberlake 8 20 0 4 80
.Anthony 6 0 0 0 36
Ward 3 0 0 0 18
Henderson- 3 0 0 0 18
Detwiler 3 4 0 0 18
Fisher 2 0 0 0 12
Smitli 1 0 1 0 8
Sygar 1 1 0 0 7
Farabee 0 0 1 0 2
Team (Safety) 2
11CH. TOTALs 27 21 2 4 201
Opp. Totals 11 7 0 2 76

Timberlake
Detiler
Ward
Anthony
Fisher
Sygar
Evashevski
Bass
Reid
Lee
Gabler
Yolk
A llison
Radigan
Kempe
Greene

RUSHING
Tries Gains Loss Net Ave.
144 748 174 574 3.9
70 312 30 282 4.0
91 465 38 427 4.7
132 594 15 579 4.3
43 183 8 175 4.0
4 13 2 11 2.8
8 31 8 23 2.8
7 16 3 13 1.9
2 8 0 8 4.0
3 7 0 7 2.3
3 4 11 -7 -2.3
5 23 0 23 4.0
3 25 0 25 8.3
1 1 0 1 1.0
PUNTING
No. Yds. Ave.
42 1523 36.2
1 34 34.0

Timberlake
Evashevski
Hollis
Gabler
Sygar
Rindfuss
Volke
Kirby
Henderson
Detwiler
Farabee
Smith
Rindfuss
Lee
Sygar
Ward

PASSING
Att. Comp.Int. Yds. TD
127 63 5 807 4
7 1 1 15 0
2 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 31 1
2 1 0 47 0
1 1 0 33 1

1Rushling
Passing
Penalty
Totals

FIR{ST DOWNS
MIlCHI.
12.1
44
10
175

RECEIVING
No. Yds.
6 38
27 393
10 184
8 88
8 131
3 31
1 9
3 24
1 5

Opp.
61
59
13
133

TD
0
3
2
0
1
0
0
1
0

Mphasis by TOM WEINBERG
Sports Editor
Michigan Football:
Why It's the King
A football game is more than just 22 guys running around after a
funny-shaped ball.
And college football is more than just a diversion of a couple
dozen- millionaries who hire young giants as paid gladiators for three
months. of the year.
Football at Michigan is still another story.
Starting with the point-a-minute teams of Fielding H. Yost at
the beginning of the century, through the great Kipke and Crisler
teanhs; down to last season's Rose Bowl champions under Bump
Elliott; Michigan football has been the standard of the nation. And
football is king at Michigan.
But the development of an athletic program at Michigan
doesn't start and end with football, as it does at a few other
schools. The football greatness is representative of the excellence
upon which the University keys itself.
But there's more to the football tradition at Michigan than just
great teams. Football has, and probably for a long while will over-
shadow the other sports. Even a basketball team that fell just a few
whistles short of the national title, or a Big Ten championship wrestl-
ing, tennis or gymnastics team, or for that matter, a second place
team--in baseball, track, golf or swimming doesn't steal the luster
from last year's football squad. Last season, the students and some
100,000-plus alumni had a feeling for the football team that lingered
through the entire winter and spring.
Intangible Reasons ... .
The doubters might say that it's just because the Wolverines were
so great last year. But I don't buy it. There's something intangible
about a Michigan game that sets it off from any other. I could sense
it three years ago, when the team was lucky to finish the season with
just two wins, one a nonconference triumph over Army and the other
a squeaker over brother Pete
Elliott's Illini on the coldest Sat-
urday within memory.
3 S.So, it's not just a good team.
,.. There's something special about
r<. Michigan games, and I can't be
tooobectveabout it. There are
Sother schools that fill up their
stadiums more often and with
more people per game than we
do. Other schools from time to
time have better teams than we
do. There certainly are more in-
terested and enthusiastic stu-
dent bodies than we have. But
there really isn't the same feel-
ing about football anywhere
else.
Sure, there are football Satur-
days every week in the fall all
over the country. And there are
H. . (FRITZ) CRISLER parties in the dorms with apple
j u i c e and cookies, fraternity
brunches, radios blasting in windows, cars honking all over town, and
long lines in every restaurant in any one of a few hundred little col-
lege towns four or five Saturdays in the fall.
But it's just not the same anywhere else. Not because you're here
or I'm here. It's more than that.
I guess part of it stems from the alumni. They perpetuate the
feeling that has persisted for over 60 years in Ann Arbor. In fact, I
sometimes think that University President Harlan Hatcher and the
Regents held off the big fund drive for the year when the football
team is at its highest moment. The feeling of excellence that the
alumni can experience on one Saturday afternoon at Michigan Sta-
dium, viewing the game from the President's private little booth fol-
lowing a beautifully arranged luncheon meeting, can and does bring
in more money than it costs the University to maintain the entire
athletic program for centuries.
But, regardless of how many there are, or how rich and powerful
they may have become, there's more than just alumni in an athletic
program that has meaning to such a diverse student body and alumni
audience.
Enter Crisler . .
Maybe that's where H. O. (Fritz) Crisler and the Athletic Depart-
ment come in. Through the years, athletics at Michigan have never
been permitted to stand still. A great record on the football field
wasn't quite enough for Crisler and the faculty members (nine),
alumni (three) and students (two) on the University's Board in Con-
trol of Intercollegiate. Athletics who have guided the fate of sports
here.
All eyes have been set on progress. And although it's often slow,
it's usually in the right direction. Like saying: A good football team
isn't enough; the players should be as representative of the student
body as any other group on campus. So high academic standards for
all athletes have been imposed. Michigan isn't content to follow the

Big Ten's eligibility standards. Its levels are higher, not only for ad-
mission, but for performance once enrolled. A good football team
hasn't been enough. Michigan went after the finest personnel avail-
able to recruit the best athletes to represent the University in every
spor. Last season's unprecedented record in all sports is testimony to
he job they've done.
nre. there are hns in the system. Maybe the Michigan ath-

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