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August 07, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-07

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SATURDAY AUGUST 7,1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

SAT..DA. AUUT.18 H IHG NDIYPG

-----------

MAY INTERVENE:

Johnson Signs Votig Rights Bil

Steel-Industry Labor
Talks Getting Nowhere
WASHINGTON P)-Steel-industry labor talks are getting vir-
tually nowhere, an informed source said yesterday, and White House
intervention may be required to head off a strike.
The Pittsburgh negotiations between the AFL-CIO United Steel
Workers Union and 10 major steel firms are inching slowly into a
new crisis, the source said.
"It's going to take more of a crisis atmosphere at the end of this
month" to budget the near stalemate, said the source who declined
to be identified.
Strike Date Set
A strike is set for midnight Aug. 31 if no agreement is reached.
A week ago, both union President I. W. Abel and chief industry
negotiator R. Conrad Cooper ex-
pressed confidence a new contract }
could be reached on before the
deadline.z
At the same time, the union's'
wage policy committee had harsh
ly criticized industry negotiators
calling them inflexible penny-
pinchers. Cooper retorted that the
charge is "the tired old tactic of
blaming us."
Negotiations Underway
The negotiations have been un-
derway for 13 weeks under a tem-
porary strike truce that narrowly
averted a walkout last May 1.
Top federal mediators helped
win the four-month postponement<
after high administration officials
warned a strike would sharply set
back the nation's long economic
boom. -

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson signed the voting
rights bill yesterday and said the
struggle for racial equality must
turn to "a different battlefield to
overcome legacies of oppression."
Johnson promised swift and cer-
tain enforcement to put the ballot,
"an important instrument of free-
dom," into the hands of millions.
The bill will have its major
effect on seven southern states.
It will strike down literacy tests
and similar devices and authorize
federal registration of voters, if
it is necessary, to open the poll-
ing booth to Negroes.
No Qualifier
The bill rules out voter quali-
fication tests-including any re-
quirement that people be able to
read and write-in Alabama, Loui-
siana, Georgia, Mississippi, South
Carolina, Virginia and part of
North Carolina,.
And it sends Atty. Gen. Nicholas
Katzenbach into federal court to
challenge the legality of the poll
taxes in Mississippi, Alabama, Vir-
ginia and Texas.
Presidential promises of action
drew applause from the crowd
present at the signing o fthe bill.
File Challenge
Katzenbach will file at 1 p.m.
today a lawsuit challenging the
constitutionality of Mississippi's
poll tax. Mississippi has indicated
it will contest the action.
The Justice Department today
will publish in the federal reg-
ister, and thus officially certify,
the states that will be covered
by the bill. That publication rules
out voter literacy tests.

-Associated Press
VIETNAMESE SOLDIERS AND UNITED STATES MARINES continue a search for Viet Cong
guerrillas. While no guerillas have been sighted, so far 40 Marines have had heat strokes.
BM57,Spreads War's Havoe

--Associated Pre
PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON gave a speech prior to sign
ing the controversial voting rights bill. The bill has a direi
affect on seven southern states.

SAIGON P) - A bomb-laden
United States B-57 Canberra jet,
shot up in a raid against the Viet
Cong, crashed and spread war's
havoc yesterday on a main street
of Nha Trang. A U.S." spokesman
said at least 12 Vietnamese civil-
ians were killed.
Elsewhere other planes, combat
troops and U.S. destroyers carried
on a campaign officially reported
to have inflicted on the Viet Cong
in July their heaviest casualties
for any one-month period of the
war.
A U.S. miiltary spokesman said
the guerrillas "may well have lost
a division of troops." That could
mean 10,000 fen.
Seventy-one persons, including
eightdAmericans, were reported
injured ,by, the plunge of the
twin-engine plane into Nha Trang,
on the South China Sea 200 miles
northeast of Saigon, and the sub-
sequent fire and explosion of four
of its 250-pound bo'nbs.
Two hundred -miles up the
coast, a regimental-sized task force
of U.S. Marines and Vietnamese
troops hunted vainly under a hot
sun for Viet Cong units that have
ranged elusively in the Quang
Ngai area since smashing a series
of government outposts.
Air strikes to secure a landing
zone for the helicopters that fer-
ried in the Marines killed a peas--
ant girl. So far as could be deter-
mined, the ground drive brought

no Viet Cong casualties. But
about 40 Marines suffered heat
strokes in temperatures that soar-
ed past 130 degrees. Helicopters
removed them.
Briefing officers said Vietna-
mese government forces killed 109
guerrillas in scattered fighting
and U.S. and IVetnamese war-
planes were estimated to have ac-
counted for more than 40 over a
24-hour period.
The heaviest ground action
Thursday was a sharp clash at a
camp of the U.S.-advised special
forces at Duc Co, in Pleiku prov-
ince 215 miles northeast of Sai-
gon. A spokesman said 67 Viet
Cong were killed in an attack on
the camp that was marked by
heavy mortar fire. A Vietnamese
airborne unit moved in as a relief

force. Vietnamese losses were de-
scribed as moderate.
Guerrilla ground fire hit a
C-123 transport carrying 14 Viet-
namese wounded from the camp,
but it was able to continue on to
Saigon.
Government casualties in other
skirmishes were said to be light.
Guerrilla riflemen also staged a
second night harassing attack on
elements of theaU.S. Army's 101st
airborne division at Cam Ranh
Bay, 180 miles northeast of Sai-
gon. A spokesman said the para-
troopers escaped with light cas-
ualties and captured two Viet
Cong.
U.S. Marines and Navy Seabees
joined at the Chu Lai beachhead,
330 miles northeast of Saigon, to
run off some Viet Cong snipers.

The department will work
through the weekend so that on
Monday it can pinpoint the coun-
ties "where past experience clear-
ly shows that federal action will
be necessary.
Will Register
"And by Tuesday," Johnson said,
"trained federal examiners will be
at work registering eligible men
and women in 10 to 15 counties."
On Tuesday, Katzenbach will
also file poll tax challenges in
Texas, Alabama and Virginia.

Johnson played a subdued role
in that situation in line with his
policy of trying to keep major
labor crises out of the White
House.
Won't Interfere
Other informed sources said the
truce was arranged only after
some of theaparties in the talks
were persuaded that 'Johnson was
not going to bring the negotiations
to Washington as he had done a
year earlier to avert a railroad
strike.
But, these sources predict, John-
son will step in if he has to keep
a strike from marring the highly
favorable economic record during
his administration.
The union served its 30-day
strike notice July 30 after indus-'
try negotiators refused to raise
their offer of nine cents an hour.
This would be lower than the in-
terim 11.5 cents won by the union
in exchange for the four-month
strike postponement.
Demand Wage Increase
The union is demanding an 18-
cent-an-hour wage-benefits pack-
age to be added to the present
hourly rate.
Issues besides wages include
pensions, insurance and supple-
mental unemployment benefits.

I. W. ABLE

- I I

The Week To Come: A Campus Calendar

II

"And we will not delay or hes-
itate or turn aside," Johnsor
promised, "until Americans of
every race and color and origir
have the same right as all others
to share in the process of democ-
racy."
"Today," he said, "what is per-
haps the- last of the legal barriers
is tumbling . . . but the struggle
for equality must now move to
ward a different battlefield.
"It is nothing less than grant
ing every American Negro freedom
to enter the mainstream of Ameri
can life . . . for centuries of sup
pression and hatred have take:
their painful toll. It can be see:
in men without skills, childrer
without fathers, families imprison-
ed in poverty.. .
"The wounds and weakness-
the outward walls and the inwar
scars - which diminish achieve
ment are the work of America
society," the President said.
He continued, "And we mus
all now help td end them-throug
expanding programs already de
vised-and through new ones t
search out and forever end tlb
special handicaps of those who ax
black in a nation mostly white."

National RounduP
WASHINGTON-The Atomic Energy Commission announced
that a nuclear test of low yield was conducted underground yester-'
day at the AEC test site in Nevada. The term low yield covers a
blast equal to less than 20,000 tons of TNT.
It was the 16th announced weapons-related United States test
this year. In addition there has been one "plowshare" test aimed at
peaceful uses of nuclear energy.
* * * *
ATLANTA - Southern Negroes have increased their voting
strength by almost 500.000 in the past year. a figure which nearly

SATURDAY, AUG. 7
8 and 9 p.m. - The University
Activities Center and Congress-
man Vivian's office will co-spon-
sor the showing of the films of the
"space-walk" in the Michigan
League Ballroom. Rep. Weston E.
Vivian (D-Ann Arbor) will nar-
rate the films.
SUNDAY, AUG. 8
4:30 p.m. -Alonzo Sherer will
give an organ recital in the organ
studio at the Music School, North
Campus.
MONDAY, AUG. 9
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Abraham Kap-
lan of the philosophy department
will speak on "Philosophies of
Languages" in the Natural Science
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Janice Harsanyi, so-
prano, will give a guest recital
in Rackham Aud.
TUESDAY, AUG. 10
'7:30 p.m.-Prof. Yehoshua Bar-

Hillel of Hebrew University will
speak on "Semantics - From a
Linguistic Logicians's Point of
View" in the Natural Science Aud.
WEDNESDAY, AUG: 11
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel" under the musical
direction and conduction of Prof.
Josef Blatt of the music school
and under the stage direction of
Prof. Ralph Herbert of the music
school.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet
will give a concert in Rackham
Aud. It will feature Angel Reyes,
violin; Gustave Rosseels, violin;
Robert Corte, viola and Jerome
Jelinek, cello.
THURSDAY, AUG.12
7:30 p.m.--Prof. Yehoshua Bar-
Hillel of Hebrew University will
discuss "Semantics-From a Lin-
guistic Critic's Point of View" in
Rackham Aud.

8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."
FRIDAY, AUG.13
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."
9 p.m.-Martians will land on
the Diag.
SATURDAY, AUG. 14
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."

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-equals the number of Negroes add-
ed to voting lsts in 11 states
over the previous five years.
MONTGOMERY - Gov. George
C. Wallace intensified his anti-
Communist campaign yesterday
and at the same time took steps
to meet an expected new out-
break of racial demonstrations.
Wallace urged passage of a bill
in the state Senate to ban Com-
munist speakers from the cam-
puses of state-supported colleges
and universities.
Then, behind closed doors, he
called members of the House into
conference, reportedly to talk
about the possibility of stepped-
up racial demonstrations and the
impending spread of school inte-
gration into communities whose
classrooms until now have been

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segregated.
** *
WASHINGTON - The House
Committee on Un-American Ac-
tivities announced yesterday it will
begin its public hearings on the
Ku Klux Klan in October.
Chairman Edwin E. Willis (D-
La) said in a statement that sub-
poenas have been authorized, that
"a large-number of persons" have
been and are being questioned
by investigators and that some
prospective witnesses have already
been heard in closed sessions.
Willis did not reveal how many
subpoenas have been ruthorized
or for whom. But other sources
have said at least 160 have been
issued, many for Klan leaders.
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to j
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day ,
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 7
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin and
Martha Raye in "Monsieur Verdoux":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production - William Shakespeare's
"Measure for Measure": Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Perry Daniels, baritone: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Events Sunday
School of Music Degree Recital -
Robert Roubos, organist: Hill Aud., 4:15
p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Alonzo Sherer, violinist: Organ Studio
2110, School of Music,.4:30 p.m.
Events Monday
National Association of Teachers of
Singing Workshop-Registration, School
of Music, 8 a.m.
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Abraham Kaplan, "Philosophies of Lan-
guages": Natural Science Aud., 4:10
p.m.
school of Music Doctoral Students in
Performance-Wind Instruments: Reci-
tal Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Guest Recital-Jan-.
ice Harsanyi, soprano: Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, 8:30 p.m.

General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Alonzo He-
her Sherer, Music: Performance (Vio-
in); recitals in lieu of thesis, Mon.,
Aug. 9, 3213 School of Music, at 3:30
p.m. Chairman, C. H. Thompson.
Doctoral Examination for Raleigh
Preston Player, Jr., English Language
& Literature; thesis: "The Negro Char-
acter in the Fiction of William Faulk-
ner," Mon., Aug. 9, 2601 Haven Hall, at
4 p.m. Chairman, R. F. Haugh.
Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel"
will be performed by the Opera De-
partment of the School of Music next
week, Aug. 11-14 as the final produc-
tion in the University Players' Summer
Playbill. Wednesday-Saturday evening
performances at 8 p.m., and a matinee
on Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Peace Corps Platement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat., Aug. 14,
9 a.m. at downtown Post Office, Main
and Catherine. To take test question-
naire must be completed. Details and
applications available at Bureau of Ap-
pointments,
Attention Registrants: All students
registered with the Bureau of Ap-
pointments ,both %eneral & Education-
al Divisions, are requested to notify
the Bureau of any"change of address
in order to receive job notices and to
keep your records up to date. If you
have already taken a job, we would
like to have this information also.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
TUES., AUG. 10--
City of Flint, Mich. - Accountant
Trainee. Min. 2 acctg. courses-acctg.
degree not req. Also Personnel Tech.
Degree in Bus., Public ,or Personnel
Admin., Educ., Phych., or rel. 1 yr.
exper. pref.
POSITION OPENINGS:
B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio-Var-
ious openings including 1. Tax Ac-
countant, degree in acctg. 2 yrs. ex-
per. 2. Communication Repres, BS
Journ. 3 yrs. exper. 3. Sr. Statistician,
PhD or MS plus equiv. exper. 5-8 yrs.
exper. Also chemists, engrs., physicists,
etc.
Library of Congress, Wash., D.C. -

Manuscript Historian. MA in Ameri-
can stundies, civilization, hist. or lit. 4
yrs. exper. in research, teaching, editing
or rel. Also catalogers, MALS.
State of Michigan-Account Examin-
er. 2 yrs. college, 8 hrs. acctg. Travel
about state. Application deadline Aug.
30.
West. Michigan TV Station-Promo-
tions and public relations position.
Woman, BA English. Writing aptitude.
No exper. req. Continuity writing &
some secretarial skills.
Boys Training School, Whitmore
Lake-Boys Supervisors. Immed. open-
ing for men. H.S. grad plus 1 yr. ex-
per. or 2 yrs. college. Grad students
desired. Open to students who can
arrange their hours. Good opportunity
for men interested in soc. work, etc.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Boyne Mountain Lodge, Boyne Falls,
Michy-Needed. Waitresses & bus boys
after Aug. 18. Part or full time. De-
tails at 212 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
Glenbard High School, Glen Ellyn,
I1.-High school Biology position avail.
for Sept. 1965. Contact the Bureau of
Appointments, Educ. Div., 3200 SAB,
764-7462.
ORGAN IZATION

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NOTICES

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with
instruction, Fri., Aug. 6, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.

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DIAL 662-6264

Features Start at
1:00-3:00-5:00
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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

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2 ENCORE CLASSICS!
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