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May 11, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-11

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TUESDAY, MAY 11, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE;

Viet Cong Hits Mekong Delta Key Senate
While U.S. Continues Air Raids Rights Vote

r

Calls Dirksen Rights Bill 'Inadequate'

-I

I

By The Associated Press Returning pilots reported heavy1
SAIGON, Viet Nam-Two Amer- destruction of bridges, highway
ican soldiers were killed and eight and railroad vehicles, military em-+
wounded in a six-hour battle with placements and one large junk.
the Viet Cong 30 miles west of A United States spokesman said
Saigon yesterday, one of several the planes encountered light to
attacks during the weekend in the moderate groundfire but that all
Mekong River delta. planes returned safely without
Meanwhile, American and Viet- sighting enemy aircraft.
namese warplanes began pounding In the Mekong Delta fighting,
military targets in North Viet the Viet Cong inflicted heavy
Nmeter aygmoring ndh con- casualties on the Catholic refugee
Nam yesterday morning and con- _r,_ -,,__ _

1
I

tinued the aerial
through yesterday.
World Nc
Roundu
By The Associated Pre
WASHINGTON - Sec
the Treasury Henry H. F
yesterday the governm
about $975 million from
holdings in the first fou
of the year-far more
$125 million for all last3

pounding Isettlement of Hai Yen. Then, early
Sunday, they attacked a nearby
outpost and threw mortar fire on
the town. Three Vietnamese sol-
diers and seven civilians, includ-
WS ing five children,.were reported
wounded.
Heavier casualties were suffered
in a Viet Cong attack on an out-
ppost 45 miles Southwest of Saigon
early yesterday. Thirteen defend-
ers were killed, seven wounded and
four captured.
cretary of Viet Cong forces seized and held
owler said a key stretch of road north of
vent lost Saigon last Wednesday and foiled
its gold government efforts to break
.r months through for four days.

toll to 366 dead.
Gen. Lo Jui-Ching of Red China
declared yesterday the history of
the 20 years since World War II
"has fully demonstrated that, with
all its nuclear weapons, U.S. im-
perialism is like a large tree eaten
hollow with worms."
'The day is drawing nigh when
this tree will be uprooted by the
worldwide storm of the People's
(Communist) Revolution," the
Chinese Army Chief of Staff wrote
in the magazine Red Flag.
Lo reiterated Peking's support
of the Viet Cong guerrillas, de-
claring China is "prepared to send
our men to fight together with
the people of Viet Nam when they
need us . . . whether or not U.S.
imperialism bombs our country
and whether or not it enlarges
the war."
Labor Par-ty
Squeaks by
Closest Vote
LONDON (P) - Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's Labor govern-
ment won a budgetary test last
night by three votes.
The margin of 299-296 was the
narrowest yet on a major issue
since Wilson took office last Oc-
tober.
The Laborites survived a test on
their steel nationalization pro-
gram last Thursday by four votes.
Tonight's vote gave approval
in principle to Wilson's national
budget, which includes higher in-
come, alcohol and tobacco taxes,
expanded capital gains levies and
a new tax on corporate profits.

JL.r; vwV .M v ww T

WASHINGTON ()-With the
United States Senate poised for
a crucial decision on Negro voting
rights, Republican leader Everett
M. Dirksen forecast yesterday re-
jection of a liberal bid to ban poll
taxes in state elections.
Democratic leader Mike Mans-
field, who is also against the
measure, was optimistic-but cau-
tious-in his prediction on the
outcome of today's test. "I'm rea-
sonably hopeful," said Mansfield,
who, with Dirksen, opposes the
poll-tax ban as unconstitutional.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-
Mass). who proposed the ban
along with 38 co-sponsors, said he
now counts 42 votes firmly for it.
Alternative
Instead of the poll tax ban,
Dirksen and Mansfield back a
measure that would send the gov-
ernment to court for a swift chal-
lenge of the poll taxes required of
state voters in Texas, Alabama,
Mississippi and Virginia.
The poll-tax issue has become
the focus of controversy on the
Johnson bill, which would suspend
literacy tests and authorize federal
registration of voters in wide areas
of the South.
Kennedy offered no firm fore-
cast on the outcome. He did not
dispute Dirksen's prediction but
told reporters some senators still
have not decided how they will
vote.
Close One
Dirksen conceded that the vote,
due at 1 p.m. today, will be a close
one but told newsmen:
"I think we'll win."
Mansfield, who hopes to see
the Johnson bill passed by the
end of the week, said after the
vote on Kennedy's amendment he
will seek Senate agreement to
limit the debate.

By MARK KILLINGSWORTH federal registrars,
Special To The Daily Negroes to go to
trars for one mor
DLAkSING -'T h e Mansfield- they can try the I
Dirksen voting rights bill is an _a sure way to
inadequate piece of legislation - people from votin
and yet strangely enough the ad- -"There is no
ministration and the Senate lead- bill for federalo
ership oppose efforts to bring it poll oy a
up to strength," Joseph L. Rauh,polls, oyouom
vice-president of Americans for ietyour vote cou
Action, charged here Saturday. against intimidati
Rauh, speaking at the Kennedy Rauh also criti
Awards dinner of the Young Dem- by Sen. Everett
ocrats Clubs of Michigan, declared, which would allow
"the reason for this is simply that tion one house oft
'Dirksen says no' is the pass word on factors othert
around Washington." "It could, if pass
The civil rights attorney who est blot on the
was legal counsel in 1964 for the Johnson adminisi
Mississippi Freedom Democratic 'Accomn
Party at the Democratic National Rauh blasted
Convention and is now chairman the Johnson adm
of the District of Columbia Demo- dency to "acco
cratic National Committee told the Dirksen on the v
Young Democrats, "If you don't and on reapporti
start speaking out, 1965 may not "T h e admini
be the year for civil rights." Dirksen in 1964 to
Criticizes Bill buster. But the S
He leveled these criticisms at lost their leader
the present voting rights bill: Russell (D-Ga) t
-It does not ban the poll tax, one has come fo
"despite many indications that it him.
is not unconstitutional to do so "The administr
and despite overwhelming evi- need Dirksen any
dence that, for example, in Mis- "A far better
sissippi-where the $3 poll tax is worth waiting for
equivalent to many Negroes' daily filibuster, which
earnings-the tax effectively de- Southerners are
stroys the right to vote." Hypoc
-"While it does provide for Rauh also criti

the bill requires
the state regis-
e attempt before
federal registrars
prevent many
Ag "
provision in the
ovservers at the
ay vote but not
nted," and there
quate protection
ion."
cized a proposal
Dirksen (R-Ill)
states to appor-
their legislatures
than population:
ed, be the great-
record of the
tration."
odation'
what he called
inistration's ten-
mmodate" Sen.
voting rights bill
onment.
stration needed
o ward off a fili-
outhern bloc has
r, Sen. Richard
to illness and no
rward to replace
ration doesn't
ymore.
bill is certainly
for two weeks of
is about all the
good for."
risy?
cized Dirksen for

"There are too many people on
both sides of the civil rights con-
troversy to whom the only answer
is confrontation," he said. "We
will win the struggle, but we've
got to show that laws can work
fast enough so that there need not
be violence-the violence which I
greatly fear may otherwise re-
sult."
Participation
Speaking directly to his Young
Democratic audience, Rauh added,
"The fun in politics comes not in
personalities or convention bicker-
ing. It lies in seeing your ideals
transformed into public action-it
lies in participation in the great
affairs of our country.
Observersuhere said that dissat-
isfaction among some Young
Democrats about the state group's
lack of action on issues and "ex-
cessive" preoccupation with per-
sonalities prompted an important
Michigan Democratic friend of
Rauh to suggest that he include
these remarks in his speech:
"If you really mean what you
say, you'll talk to other Young
Democrats and tell them you watt
pressure on their senators for an
adequate voting rights bill."

SEN. EVERETT DIRKSEN

than the
year.

Furthermore, while Fowler and
other gover.nment economic ex-
perts joined President Lyndon B.
Johnson in appraising the general
economic outlook as favorable, the
treasury secretary said:
"I think we can expect some
additional loss of gold."
* * *
NEW DELHI, India-Four per-
sons were killed and a number
arrested during a weekend of riot-
ing in Kashmir over India's send-
ing Eheik Mohammed Abdullah,
into exile.
* * *
SEOUL, Korea-A plot to over-
throw the government has been
broken up and seven army officers
and civilians are under arrest, the
South Korean Army announced
yesterday.
Details of the plot were not an-

Sources reported the Viet Cong
set up roadblocks about 80 miles
northeast of Saigon on the road to
Dalat, stopped all vehicles, and
mixed in with their civilian cap-
tives so completely that airstrikes
could not be used.
The battle, west of Saigon, be-
gan early Sunday when a Com-
munist mortar barrage descended
on the capital of Hau Nghia
province.
Viet Cong mortar barrages were
mounted simultaneously on the
Hau Nghia towns of Bao Trai,
Duc Hoa and My Hanh. A Viet
Cong infantry attack hit a Ran-
ger unit guarding a bridge near
Duc Hoa.
The two U.S. soldiers killed in
yesterday's Mekong Delta action
raised the American combat death

maintaining that "the Supreme
Court is so liberal it will uphold
the one man, one vote principle
but so conservative it would not
strike down the poll tax."
"This is not inconsistency; it's
hypocrisy," he said.
Praising Michigan's Democratic
senators, Patrick McNamara and
Philip Hart-who is floor manager
of the voting rights bill-Rauh de-
clared "it would be far better for
the justice department to consult
them than the man who nomi-
nated Sen. (Barry) Goldwater for
President last July."

INSTANT SILENCE
For information write:
Academic Aids, Box 969
Berkeley, California
94701

Across Campus

r

GRAID MI! IIXIERk

i

TUESDAY, MAY 11
7 a.m.-The Federated Garden
Clubs of Michigan will hold con-
ference registration at the Michi-
gan Union.
8:30 a.m.-There will be a short
course on the Administration of

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n ounced.
)AI LI
LA PAZ, Bolivia-The ruling
military junta says it has evidence ..
of divisive political action. anarchy

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and lack of democracy in the
country. So it is postponing in-
definitely the presidential elections
hdld fn Ot1

sI e e or u *.
LONDON-Greece and Turkey
agreed yesterday to seek a peace-
ful solution to the crisis on Cyprus,
the Mediterranean island where
residents of Greek and Turkish
descent have been feuding.
DIAL 5-6290
"'CAT BAL LOU'
ISAGEM-
By ALL MEANS
SEE 'CAT BALLOU'!"
-STEVEN HALLER,
MICHIGAN DAILY

IN-
It's that wa-ut
whopper of
western!
EOLUMPIA a HAROLD
PICURiES HEMOT

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitl of Michiran, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, MAY;11
General Notices
Lecture: Prof. JamesDuesenberry,
Harvard Univ., "The Strategy of Fed-
eral Reserve Policy," Wed., May 12, 4
p.m., East Conference Room (4th floor),
Rackham Bldg.
Lecture: Prof. Herman Chernoff, Stan-
ford Univ., "Sequential Analysis and
Control Theory," Wed., May 12, 4
p.m., 3010 Angell Hall.
French and German Screening Exam-
inations: The screen examinations in
French and German for Doctoral can-
ENDS WEDNESDAY
WINNER OF
3
Academy
4A ,
I ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATESIRENE PAPAS
aICHAELCACOYANNISPRODUCTION
"ZORBATHE GREEK"
.. -LA ERO A
Shows at 6:40 & 9:08
STARTING FRIDAY
"WOMAN IN
THE DUNES"

didates will be administered on Thurs.,
May 20, 3 p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Doctoral candidates must pass the
screening examination before taking
the written test in French or German
unless they have received B or better
in French III or German III. Those
who fail the examination may take it
again when the test is administeredI
in June. Bring your own No. 2 pen-s
cils.
Foreign Visitors{
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Mrs. Milda P. Andersen, training offi-
cer, Inter-American Development Bank,
Washington, May 7-12.
Young Ho Kim, senior announcer/
producer educational TV, Seoul, Ko-
rea, May 9-16.
Miss June Chun, executive director,
Foundation for International Coopera-
tion, New York City, May 10-11.
Miss Yoshimi Sasaki, International
Liaison Office, Waseda University, To-
kyo, May 10-12.
Mrs. Keiko Takirai, International
Liaison Office, Waseda University, To-
kyo, May 10-12.
A group of Mexicans, chemical engi-
neering students, Instituto Politecnico
Nacional, Mexico City, May 12.
Bozidar T. Micic, chief, Department
of Standards, Federal Institute of Pub-
lic Health, Yugoslavia, May 12-16.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Feenstra, pro-
fessor of Roman law, State University
of Leiden, The Netherlands, May 12-15.
G. A. Henrik Schauman, chief librar-
ian, Library of Parliament, Finland,
May 15-18.
Mr.and Mrs. Radoslav Ratkovic, pro-
fessor, head of sociological department,
School of Political Sciences, Yugoslavia,
May 16-June 5.
TRAVEL INC.
AIRLINE
STEAMSHIP
HOTEL
CALL
665-3734
IN THE MAYNARD HOUSE
DIAL 662-6264
ENDS WEDNESDAY
Shown at 1:00-3:00
5:00-7:00 & 9:05

Carl Overzet, counseling branch, Of-
fice of International Training, De-
partment of State, Washington, May 17.
Alfred Morris, parliamentary private
secretary to the minister of agricul-
ture, Fisheries and Food, United King-
dom, May 17-19.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Foreign Service: Robert L. Barry
will be in the office Tuesday after-
noon, May 11, to speak with any in-
terested student about opportunities
with the Foreign Service of the De-
partment of State. Please call 764-7460,
Bureau of Appointments for appoint-
ment.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Equitable Life Assurance Co., Detroit
-Claims Approver, woman BBA or BA
in Econ., typing skills, shorthand help-
ful. Process various claims. Much tele-
phone work.
Regional Planning Council, Baltimore,
Md.-1. Urban Economist ,econ. with
bkgd. in planning, regional science or
rel. area to head econ. studies section.
2. Statistician Systems Analyst, knowl.

of elect, computers to head data pro-
cessing section.
YWCA-Various openings for women
throughout U.S. including Teenage,
Young Adult, & Exec. Directors, etc.
Some positions for 65 grads, some req.
2-3 yrs. exper.
National Cash Register Co., Dayton,
Ohio-Indust. designer, educ. & exper.
for project responsibility in engrg. &
res. dept.
Wilson & Co., Inc., Chicago-Person-
nel Ass't. Woman grad to assist in
recruiting, screening, interviewing &
testing applicants for positions in of-
fices and labs.
Jackson Vibrators, Ludington, Mich.
-Cost Accountant. Male, BA plus cost
acctg. exper. to headlcost dept. Age
28-35. Immecl. opening with mfr. of rail-
way equipment,

Natural Parks and Equivalent Re-
serves at 1040 Natural Resources
Building.
8:30 a.m.-The Center for Pro-
grammed Learning for Business
will present a workshop at the
Michigan Union.
1:30 p.m.-A University Man-
agement seminar on Training and
Development will be presented by
the Personnel Office at the Michi-
gan Union.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 12
7:30 a.m.-The Federated Gar-
den Clubs of Michigan will hold
conference registration at the
Michigan Union.
8:30 a.m.--There will be a short
course on the Administration of
Natural Parks and Equivalent Re-
serves at 1040 Natural Resources
Building.
8:30 a.m.-The Center for Pro-
grammed Learning for Business
will present a workshop at the
Michigan Union.
SUMMER THEATRE
WORKSHOP
Graduate & Undegraduate
College Credit Program
3 to 6 Term Hour Credits.
CO-SPONSORED BY
Mich. State University
and
Circle in the Park
Summer Theatre-Grand Rapids,
Accredited Apprenticeship
Training June 14-Sept. 3
Address Request for Detailed
Brochure and Application to:
Mrs. Norma Brink, President
Circle in the Park
Summer Theatre
1350 Pinecrest, S.E.
Grand Rapids, Mich. 49506
12 WEEK SUMMER SESSION
CONDUCTED AT
"MICHIGAN'S FIRST
ARENA SUMMER THEATRE

ARDEN MIESEN'S BAND
Sponsored by Graduate Student Council
GOOD BOOKS
BOB MARSHALL'S
BOOK SHOP'
211 S. State St.
OPEN 7 N IGHTS EACH WEEK
'til 10P.M.

VFW Hall
9-12 P.M.
One Dollar Donation
FRIDAY, MAY 14

314 E. Liberty
Stag or Drag
Refreshments

I

/r

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For further information, please
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of
pointments, 3200 SAB.

call
Ap-

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
*
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring/Summer Term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Affairs by May 26, 1965. Forms
are available in Room 1011 Student
Activities Bldg.

SUBJECTS
WANTED
for PAID
Psychological
Experiments
Call
764-2583

DON'T MISS IT!
Publishers' Remainder
99c to $1'
BOOK SALE
at
FOLLETT'S
State St. at North Univ.

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in COLUMBIA COLOR
Shows at
,3,5,7,9 P.M.
Feature 20 Minutes Later
COMING--
"NONE BUT THE BRAVE"

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BOOKFAIR
Sponsored by
FRIENDS of the ANN ARBOR
PUBLIC LIBRARY

T.

I-Me dec am e ed
>.

Soturday, May 15
1:30-5:30

On porch
of Library

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A motion picture
you'll never forget!
WT DISNEY
presents
a fa.mly yoU'll never forget!

Books, Baked Goods, Antiques,
White Elephants, Records,
Picture Frames, & Coffee Shop

TORRID
ACAPULCO!
.where
the
jet-set
love
themselves
to
piocesi

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P :
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,
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THE ROMANOFFS
GERMAN-AMERICAN CUISINE
Welcomes Ann Arbor Students
GERMAN STYLE STUFFED CABBAGE
Roll, Natural Beef Gravy, Steamed
Rice, Applesauce, Roll & Butter . . . . $..95

approves our
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