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August 05, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-08-05

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THURSDAY: AUGUST 5, 1965

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEMEE

TmJRSPAY, AUGUST ~, 1965TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

A %A J &. XO KAL

it

Viet

Cong Damages

Fuel

World News Roundup

Supply for Da Nang Base

-Associated Press
A U.S. MARINE WITH flame thrower begins to burn down a building in a Vietnamese village where
sniper fire originated. The Marines have been under orders to burn down villages where they en-
counter sniper fire, but critics say this is alienating the population in an essentially political, not
military war.
Marine Methods Crticized

'Barrage Will
Cause Little
Trouble Now
President Requests
More Funds for War
DA NANG O)-Viet Cong guer-
rillas destroyed 1.8 million gallons
of aviation fuel in a pre-dawn at-
tack yesterday on the Esso stor-
age complex serving U.S. jet war-
planes at Da Nang air base, mili-
tary authorities reported.
The fuel was destined for bomb-
ing missions against the Viet Cong
and North Viet Nam.
First reports said the installa-
tion was destroyed. Later informa-
tion said, however, that four of
nine storage tanks at the Esso
Standard Eastern facility were
wrecked.
A government outpost protect-
ing the fuel storage facility was
overrun and suffered heavy cas-
ualties during a 45-minute at-
tack that opened with a mortar
barrage at 1 a.m.
The complex is about two miles
from positions held by several
hundred American Marines.
Audacious
The assault was the most auda-
cious by the Viet . Cong in Da
Nang area since guerrilla squads
hit the air base itself a little
more than a month ago, destroy-
ing three aircraft.
Potentially, the fuel loss could
be more damaging than the plane
losses to the American air war ef-,,
fort.
Military sources said all fuel for
jets and propellor-driven aircraft
must be brought in by sea and
must pass through the Esso tank
complex where it is held tempor-
arily until railroad tank cars move
the fuel to Da Nang air base.
No Crisis Near
Large fuel dumps are located at
the air base, however, and it did
not seem likely that the Ameri-
can jet aircraft would want for
fuel immediately,.
Two nights ago, U.S. Navy war-
ships shelled the hills surround-
ing the complex when reports
were received of a large Viet Cong
force.
No other action was taken.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate
sent to President Lyndon B. John-
son last night the voting rights
bill he had asked for to strike
down barriers to Negro voting in
the South.
The measure would suspend the
use of literacy and similar voter
qualification tests in much of the
South and permit the federal gov-
ernment to take over the regis-
tration of voters.
A compromise between bills pre-
viously passed by the Senate and
the House, the legislation was ap-
proved by the House Tuesday by
a 328-74 vote.
* * *
VATICAN CITY-The Vatican
weekly L'Osservatore Della Dome-
nica said yesterday it hoped no
national flag would be planted on
the moon or Mars by the first
earth visitors.
The newspaper said it did not
care if Russia or the United States
got there first. It criticized those
who view space research as a race
between Moscow and Washington.
"Let us leave politics out of an
achievement which must be only
scientific," the newspaper added.
WASHINGTON-A proposed 4.5
per cent pay raise for federal em-
ployes this year and a bigger one
next year were approved yesterday
by the House Civil Service Com-
mittee.
Next year's boost would be gear-
ed to pay increases that have been
granted in private indusstry since
1964, and is expected to range
from 6 per cent at the lower levels
to 10 per cent for top salaried
workers.

The salary proposals, which go
far beyond Pdesident Lyndon B.
Johnson's recommendations, would
apply to 1.8 million employes, in-
cluding postal workers, govern-
ment classified workers, legisla-
tive employesand foreign service
personnel.
* * *
BEIRUT, Lebanon - More than
10,000SaudiaArabian tribesmen
are massed along the Saudi,-Ye-
men border, poised to strike at the
Egyptian army in Yemen if Egypt
attacks Saudi Arabia, Saudi
sources said yesterday.
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
recently threatened to attack Sau-
di border towns if efforts to find
a peaceful solution to the three-
year-old civil war in Yemen fails.
The sources, close to King Faisal,
recently arrived from Saudi Ara-
bia.
Egypt supports the revolution-
ary regime of President Abdullah
Sallal of Yemen and has some
50,000 troops there. Saudi Arabia
backs ousted Imam Mohanimed
El-Badr and his royalist guerril-
las with arms and money.
TOKYO-Communist China ac-
cused the Malaysian government
yesterday of a plot to seize the as-
sets of the Bank of China in Sing-
apore by ordering the financial
establishment to shut down Aug.
14. Malaysia ordered the bank
closed for subversive activities.
The statement, broadcast by the
New China News Agency, declar-
ed Malaysia "must immediately
stop all its persecution"' of the
bank or "it will be held responsi-
ble for the consequences."

where racial troubles threaten.
A petition seeking to oust Fort-
son as county attorney has been
circulated.
Civil rights pickets turned up
at supermarkets again. Eight
pickets appeared at one super-
market where others were arrest-
ed two days ago.
About 25 demonstrators began a
vigil in front of the county court-
house.
Mayor T. Griffin Walker urged
all citizens to show restraint and
calmness and again called on
them not to congregate in the
street or near marchers or dem-
onstrations.
In Atlanta, Sanders said he has
instructed the state patrol to give
protection to all citizens at
Americus whether they are dem-
onstrators or not.
"I have told Col. Lowell Conner
of the patrol to take whatever ac-
tion necessary to maintain peace
down there," the governor told a
news conference. E,
State Sen. Leroy Johnson of
Atlanta, a Negro, visited Sanders
and talked with him about 30
minutes.
"I have insisted that, the gov-
ernor use the powers of his office
to protect demonstrators and non-
demonstrators alike at Americus,"
Johnson told newsmen.

-Across
THURSDAY, AUGUST 5
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Education Center will present a
film preview, "The Real West" in
the multipurpose room of the
UGLI.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players will
present Shakespeare's "Measure
for Measure" in Mendelssohn
Theatre.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 6
1:30 p.mn.-The Audio Visual
Education Center will present a
film preview, "The Red Balloon"
in the multipurpose room of the
UGLI.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present "Monsieur Ver-
doux" In the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players will
present Shakespeare's "Measure
for Measure" in Mendelssohn
Theater.

Americus Attorney
Asks Racial Council
AMERICUS, Ga. (P)-A statewide trouble-shooting community
relations council was advocated yesterday by the county attorney who
is under fire for his moderate racial views.
Warren C. Fortson said Gov. Carl E. Sanders should set up such
a state body. He also has urged formation of a biracial committee
for Americus, but community leaders have said civil rights demon-
strations would have to cease first.
Fortson said community leaders need support and assistance
from such a statewide council which could go anywhere in the state

By JOHN T. WHEELER
Associated Press Staff Writer
DA NANG-U.S. Marines are
schooled to kill under fire. In
Viet Nam they are under orders
to try to win over villagers who--
freely or under duress--harbor the
Viet Cong.
Women and children sometimes
are caught in the middle.
The same problem may beset
other American combat troops as
they become more deeply involved.
This war has long- been called
primarily a political struggle for
loyalty of "the people rather than
a massed military operation for
conquest of territory.
This week Marines teamed with
South Vietnamese troops to over-
run the Viet Cong-dominated vil-
lage of Chan Son, 10 miles south
of Da Nang. Among 25 persons
they killed were a woman and
four children.
MaJ. Gen. Lewis W. Walt, com-
mander of the 25,300 U.S. Marines
in Viet Nam, deplored the five
deaths.
In another incident, an officer

asked permission to burn several
huts as a punitive measure in a
village the Viet Cong had used
for concealment. He suggested,
however, this might cause trou-
ble with the rural pacification of-
ficer whose job it is to attempt
to win over villagers to the gov-
ernment side.-,
"Sure, I'm for pacification -
five days out of the week," a sen-
ior officer said, and gave him per-
mission to burn.
As it turned out, the Marines
didn't burn those particular huts,
since they did not go back into
the village. But many others have
been burned. Some are set off with
white phosphorous rockets, oth-
ers with cigarette lighters, match-
es, grenades and flame throwers.
Elsewhere, Marines have killed
water buffalo, chopped down ba-
nana trees and taken chickens and
ducks for their own food.
All this strikes at villagers whose
struggle to exist already is pre-
carious. I
Such acts, particularly the ser-
ious ones, are by but a few. But
they raise questions in the Ameri-
can military establishment while
a tremendous buildup is under way
to help the faltering Vietnamese
stem the Viet Cong tide.
It is a maxim in Viet Nam that
no victory is possible unless the
population is won over to the gov-
ernment side. Senior U.S. Army
and Marine commanders constant-
ly stress this point. But the theory
is hard to get down to the squad
and platoon level.
EnaeOn. CARPENTER ROAD
LOCATED 2 MILES SOUTH OF
WASHTENAW ROAD
NOW SHOWING
THE SCREEN BLAZES WITH THE
STORY BASED ON THE
BLISTERING BEST-SELLER!
BARLOW Color
-PLUS---

The Viet Cong are under rigid
discipline in regard to conduct
with the population, which they
like to describe as "water for the
guerrilla fish to swim in." Poli-
tical commissars are with every
unit to enforce the discipline.
No such system exists in the
American military, which is steep-
ed in traditions that make politi-
cal control over troops heresy.
Special schools have carefully
oriented U.S. advisers to1the poli-
tical side of the war, but no such
training is available for the ordi-
nary soldier and Marine being
sent to Viet Nam.
The breakdown in applying the
theory of "winning the hearts and
minds of the people" usually comes
when Marines charge a village
that their commanders have la-
beled as Viet Cong. The troops feel
that all those they run across are
enemies dedicated to their de-
struction.
If they receive sniper fire as
they charge across rice paddies to-
ward the village,,.they consider the
whole village an enemy strong-
point. Many react accordingly, es-
pecially when comrades are
wounded are killed in the assault.
Nearly all the villages the Ma-
rines move into are under some
degree of Viet Cong, often by de-
fault.
Many American operations now
are aimed at trying to find a ma-
jor Viet Cong force, destroy it and
then pull back to the main base.
U.S. troops so far have failed to
come up with one such battle.
If American perimeters are to
expand as planned, some day these
villages will be behind American
and Vietnamese forward positions.
The French found in the Indo-
china war that village hatred and
apathy turned their forward posi-
tions into isolated outposts subject
to attack from any direction. As
control faltered and collapsed out-
side Hanoi, Communist battalions
submerged isolated strong points
one after another.

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The Most Talked
About and Fought
About Picture Ever
Filmed!
LOUIS MALLE'S
THE LOVERS
shown at 6:30 & 10:30
daily
and
LOLITA
with JAMES MASON,
SUE LYON,
PETER SELLERS
shown at 8 p.m. only
17121 Livernois
at McNichols
UN 2-4252

The attack on Da Nang sup- {
plies came as U.S. planes made
bombing runs yesterday closer to
Communist China than ever be-
fore. U.S. sources said that some
bombing over North Viet Nam walt
done as close as 30 miles to the
Chinese border.
Washington
In Washington, President Lyn-
don B. Johnson yesterday asked
Congress for an additional $1.7
billion appropriation to finance
the expanded Vietnamese war.
It would add, among other
things, 340,000 more men to the
armed forces, bringing the total by
next June to 2.98 million. A wors-
ening of the situation could raise
that figure.
Johnson, following up his an-
nouncement of last Wednesday
that forces in Viet Nam will be
increased by 50,000 to a new to-
tal of 125,000, asked the Senate
in a letter for an "emergency
fund" for use in augmentation of
the military effort until Congress
begins its new session next Janu-
ary.
.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, andby2n p.m.,Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 5
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"The Real West": Multipur-
pose Room, Undergraduate Library, 1:30
p.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Hans. Vogt, University of Oslo, "To
What Extent Can We Sueak of a'
Caucasian Family of Languages": Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production - William Shakespeare's
"Measure for Measure": Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Clinic-Concert-"Mu-
sic for Trumpets and Brass": Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Lecture-Rajni Kothari, director of
the Center for the Study of-Developing
Societies, New Delhi, will give a semi-
nar on "The Study of Politics and Po-
litical Behavior in India," West Con-
ference Room, Rackham, 7:30 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for James
Woolley Gibb, Pharmacology; thesis:
"Factors Modifying Carbon Tetrachlor-
ide Hepatotoxicity," Fri., Aug. -6, 6314
Medical Science Bldg., 10 a.m. Chair-
man, T. M. Brody.
Doctoral Examination for George La-
vos, Education; thesis: "Patterns of
Intelligence and Achievement among
Deaf Children," Thurs., Aug. 5, 1600
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Christian Science Organization, Reg-
ular testimony meeting, Thurs., Aug.
5, 7:30 p.m., Room 3545 SAB.
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with
instruction, Fri., Aug. 6, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.
The Tutorial & Cultural Relations
Project will have a meeting, Thurs.,
Aug. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in Room 3B of
the Michigan Union to discuss prob-
lems and progress of summer tutor.
DIAL 5-6290
ENDS TONIGHT

UES, 10 a.m. Chairman, W. A. Ketcham.
Math 404 and 405 Students: For stu-
dents taking Math 404 and 405, there
will be a 30-minute film on the an-
alogue computer and its application to
differential equations, Thurs., Aug. 5,
2029 Angell Hall, 4:15 and 5:15 p.m. All
students are urged to attend.
University Players' Summer Playbill
tickets are available for "Measure for
Measure" and Humperdink's "Hansel
and Gretel" which will run Aug. 11-14.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre Box Office
is open for this week 12:30 p.m. until
8 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for William
Mueller Thwaites, Genetics; thesis: "A
Mutation Reducing Arginine Sensitivity
of Suppressed Pyr-3 Mutants in Neuro-
spora," Thurs., Aug. 5, 1139 Natural
Science Bldg., 10 a.m. Chairman, R. H.
Davis,
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has be-
come effective.
Approval request forms for student-
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
U. ofM. Men's Glee Club, piano sing,
Aug. 26-29, 8a.m. to 6 p.m., Diag.
U. of M. Men's Glee Club, advertis-
ing and record sale booths, Aug. 26-29. 8
a.m. to 6 p.m., Diag and front of the
Union.,
U. of M. Men's Glee Club, piano race,
Aug. 20, 3 p.m., Diag.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Dr. vessai, University of Tehran, Teh-
ran, Iran, Aug. 4.
Cheong You, member of National As-
sembly, Republic of Koreo, Aug. 6-8.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat, Aug. 14,
9 a.m. at downtown Post Office, Main
and Catherine. To take test question-

naire must be completed. Details and
applications available at Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
PLACEMET INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
TUES., AUG. 10-
City of Flint, Mich. - Accountant
Trainee. Min. 2 acctg. courses-acctg.1
degree not req. Also Personnel' Tech.
Degree in Bus., Public ,or Personnel
Admin.,, Educ., Phych., or rel. 1 yr.
exper. pref.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Federal National Mortgage Assoc.,
Chicago-Mortgage Intern Trng.APro-,
gram. Grads in fiscal mgmt. or fi-
nance for tech. admin. in housing and
finance agency.
Waukegan Township High School,
Waukegan, 11.--Immed. opening for Di-
rector of Services. Supv. & direct main-
tenance of bldg. & grounds on 2

CIVITAN,
JAZZ, BAND4
CONCERtT
REFRESHMENTS 4
DANCING
FRI.- AUG. 6, 1965
8-12 P.M.
GERMAN PARK'4
DONATION$1.25
-4
You Must Be 21 To Attend

campuses & athletic fields. Teaching
certificate not required.
U.S. Coast Guard Academy, New Lon-
don, Conn. 6- Counseling Psychologist.
PhD with rel. internship and/or exper.
In counsel./Clinlc. psych. Counsel ca-
dets, advise & consult with admin.,&
staff.
Supervisor of Shipbuilding, U.S.N.,"
Bay City, Mich.-Elect. Engr. BS Elect.
or Electronic Engrg. plus 3 yrs. exper.
State Board exam req. Application
deadline Sept. 1.
The Toni Co., Chicago-Chemists (Or-
ganic, Analyt., & Phys.) for R. & D.
lab. Also MS or PhD in Chem., Bio-
chem. or Pharmacology.
Lee C. Moore Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa.-
Engrs. Civil & Mec4i. 0-5 yrs. exper.
for dev. & des. in oil field drilling
equip. Moderate travel. Assignment to
Tula, Okla., after initial trng.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

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IFESTIVAL, ONE POTATO, I
1,TWO POTATO," SCORED
THE LONGEST, LOUDEST1
OYATION IN 9 YEARS!"
-7/me Magazine
AND
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D

11

~.m ~ - mm n mmmmmi======mmmmm =======m====m==m Ur
CINEMA GUILD
I U
I U
presents
CHARLIE (HA PLIN :
I I
I Un
CONSIEUR VERDUX
with Martha Raye

I

CAMPUS

* GCEO
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GREAT
SUNDA
*0

RGE
IT'S
EST

WEIN PRESENTS FESTIVAL PRELUDE

JAZZ

CONCERT

%Y, AUG. 15-CODB ARENA 8 P. M.

RAS IE°

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F"K, -.W: Off :-IMERM,

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