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July 30, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-07-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGS g'

TH MCHGA DIL AGE TWRER~a~

I,

Former Greek Premier
Gains Deputies' Support

WHITE HOUSE VISIT:
Johnson Explains Draft
Increase to Governors,
WASHINGTON (IP)-President Lyndon B. Johnson told the na-
tion's governors yesterday the story of his decision to more than
double the draft and sharply boost the United States troop commit-
ment in South Viet Nam.
Among the state leaders who flew to the White House by jet
and helicopter from Minneapolis were two Republicans who withheld,
support of Johnson's order.
The President announced Wednesday draft calls would be stepped'
up from 17,000 to 35,000 a month, and U.S. fighting strength in Viet

Drafts Could Increase

ATHENS QP) - Former Premier
George Papandreou won commit-
ments yesterday from enough dep-
uties to defeat Greece's crisis gov-
ernment in a parliamentary con-
fidence vote.
But Premier George Athanasia-
dis-Novas gave no indication he
would give up his battle to ob-
tain endorsement from the 300-'
member Parliament.
And there ' was no sign that
King Constantine was ready to re-
treat in the crisis .that erupted
two weeks ago last night when
' he fired Papandreou and appoint-
ed Athanasiadis-Novas in a dis-

pute over politics in the armed
forces.
Party Caucus
Papandreou whipped Center Un-
ion Party deputies into line
against the king's government at
a party caucus in Athens. The
deputies met to plan strategy for
the confidence vote battle. Parlia-
ment meets in special session to-
day, with the vote expected late
next week.
A Center Union spokesman said
the caucus drew up a protocol de-
nouncing the Athanasiadis-Novas
government. The spokesman said
118 of 120 deputies at the caucus

HALT VIOLENCE:
Tanders Orders State
Troos into Americus
By The Associated Press
AMERICUS, Ga.-Gov. Carl E. Sanders of Georgia dispatched
about 100 state troopers into Americus yesterday following the slay-
ing of a white youth in a climax to 10 days of demonstrations.
Sanders also ordered the state attorney general to begin an
immediate investigation of racial problems in two counties that are
targets in'a Negro voter drive.
"I will not stand for any further violence of any kind," Sanders
said in a statement dictated to his capitol office in Atlanta from

signed it and that 25 more who did,
not attend adhered to it in tele-
grams.
With these 143 votes lined up
against him, and 22 deputies of
the United Democratic Left (EDA)
party bound to vote against him,
Athanasiadis-Novas has no chance
of getting more than 135 votes in
Parliament. He needs 151.
Refuse Support
Two Center Union deputies who
attended the caucus but refused to
sign the protocol also oppose Ath-
anasiadis-Novas. But they refused
to go along with Papandreou.
They said they wanted a solution
to the crisis to be worked out
immediately. Papandreou said that
would be done at a future caucus,
after Athanasiadis-Novas falls.
Papandreou is expected to have
a harder time mustering support
for his own return to power. While
Center Union deputies joined in
opposing the present government,
a majority of them are reported
to prefer a compromise premier
rather than a return of Papan-
dreou.
A crowd of 5000 Papandreou
supporters gathered in the streets
outside the meeting hall lustily
cheered Papandreou as he emerg-
ed after the 40-minute caucus. All
police in the Athens area had been
alerted for possible trouble. But
the crowd broke up without inci-
dent.
After Caucus
After the caucus, the former
premier told newsmen a copy of
the protocol would be sent to the
king because the Athanasiadis-No-
vas cabinet "is a government ap-
pointed by the palace." He added
that he plans to tour the coun-
try to arouse support for his cause,
In the event that Athanasiadis-
Novas loses the coming vote of
confidence, the king will be forced
to either accept Papandreou as
premier again or declare general
elections. In the event that open
elections are declared, Papandreou
is confident that he can win them
by a large majority.
Support has been illustrated
t h r o u g h mass demonstrations
which have rocked Athens during
the past three weeks.
Another alternative measure
which is gaining momentum, how-
ever, is to find a compromise

Nam will be boosted immediately f:
Proposes $10
Pay Raise forj
Combat Duty
WASHINGTON (P)-A boost of
$10 in the present special combat
pay of $55 a month for United'
States fighting men was proposed
yesterday by Sen. Russell (D-Ga).
Russell, chairman of the Sen-
ate Armed Services Committee,
said he would offer this addition
to a $1 billion general military pay
boost approved by the House.
Opposition to the amount of'
increase in the House-passed
measure came atthe initial Sen-
ate hearing from Norman S. Paul,
assistant secretary of defense for
manpower. But he said he saw no
objection to Russell's suggestion
for higher combat pay.
Paul supported the original pro-
posal by President Lyndon B.
Johnson and Secretary ofnDe-
fense Robert S. McNamara for a
5 per cent boost in basic pay for
most officers and men, instead
of the House increases averaging
more than 10 per cent.
He said the proposed House in-
creases would cost nearly $1 bil-
lion a year for the 2.6 million
men and women on active duty
and $1.5 million when future re-
tirement costs are included.
The original administration pro-
posal would cost $447 million ad-
ditional plus $277 million more in
future retirement benefits, Paul
said.
The special combat pay of 55 a
month is an across-the-board
amount for all services. The ques-
tion of who is eligible is deter-
mined by area commanders. They
take into account danger' and the
length o ftime an individual might
be exposed to it.

rom 75,000 to 125,000 men.. Among
Uthose called to the meeting was
United Nations Ambassador Ar-
thur J. Goldberg, whom Johnson
dispatched to New York Wednes-
day with a bid for UN efforts to
find a path to peace in Viet Nam.
Johnson invited the governors
here from their annual conference,
where the state chief executives
had adopted a resolution endors-
ing "the principles of the position
of this country as enunciated by
the President."
"I will give them all the in-
formation I can-confidential,
secret and otherwise-because I
have great respect for them and
their judgment, their opinions and
their leadership," Johnson said.
"And it's going to be necessary in
this effort."
Among the first to arrive were
Govs. Mark O. Hatfield of Oregon
and George Romney of Michigan,
the only men to vote against the
endorsing motion at the Minnea-
polis conference.
Romney had asked that action
be deferred until after the White
House briefing. "We have no way
of knowing whether he was right
or wrong," Romney said when the
conference acted minutes after
Johnson's Wednesday announce-
ment.
"Escalation of action in Viet
Nam is moving all the people of
the earth closer to World War III,
Hatfield had said in Minneapolis.
Johnson responded saying, "I
would hope that Gov Hatfield and
the other governors, when they
understand what we are doing and
when I have a chance to submit
myself to their questioning and to
counsel with them, would share my
view."
The White House said it was
the fourth time Johnson, as Pres-
ident, has met with a big delega-
tion of state governers. The first
came three days after the assassi-
nation of President Kennedy.

By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON-The 50,000
buildup of forces in Viet Nam,
announced Wednesday by Pres-
ident Lyndon B. Johnson could
have been higher,
Information now available
shows that the President did
consider a larger and swifter
expansion in Viet Nam than
that actually decided upon.
It is said that at some point
during the conference with ad-
visers, Johnson determined that
he would make a decision only
on an immediate troop increase.
Will Be More
In announcing the dispatch
of 500,000, however, the Presi-
dent said more would be sent,
but did not indicate how many.
Indications suggest that John-
son will undertake another de-
cision making review of the
Vietnamese war in two or three
months and will probably or-
der another increase in United
States forces at that time.
At the time Johnson doubled
the monthly draft calls - from
17,000 to 35,000--the President
decided against calling up re-

serves andNational Guard
units at this time. But this
too remains a possibility for la-
ter in the year.
Diplomatic Factor
A diplomatic factor affecting
the announcement was what
the impact of a fast and mas-
sive buildup of United States
forces would have in Hanoi, Pe-
king and Moscow.,
Study was evidently given to
this question and U.S. leaders
felt, it is said, that a more de-
liberate buildup not undertaken
on a crash basis and not rad-
ically changing the nature of
the war at this time, might
produce less violent reaction.
Johnson is currently putting
out diplomatic "feelers" to de-
termine the chances of peace-
ful end to the Viet Nam conflict
and indicate whether an esca-
lation of force is needed.
Negotiation?
State Department leaders be-
lieve that the North Vietnamese
government may be willing to
go to the negotiating table at
some point. The new round of
peace probing ordered by John-
son is designed to find out
whether that is true.

For this reason Ambassador
Arthur J. Goldberg was sent to
the United Nations with an ap-
peal for UN help on the diplo-
matic front. Two weeks ago.
Ambassador W. AverellkHarri-
man went to Moscow and talk-
ed with Premier Alexei Kosy-
gin. Harriman also met with
Yugoslavian leaders.
Many diplomats from these
two countries and other coun-
tries such as Britain and Gha-
na are in touch with Asian
Viet Cong forceshand can find
out whether negotiation is pos-
sible.
Trip to Saigon
Henry Cabot Lodge is also ex-
pected to go to Saigon some-
time before mid-August. He
may then return to Washington
or Honolulu or have Secretary
of Defense Robert McNamara
and other officials come to
Saigon for talks.
The prospect is that by some-
time in October Johnson him-
self will have the necessary
information for new decisions
bringing on the escalation of
the war as well as on pros-
pects for bringing it to a close
by peaceful means.

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Upholds Hoffa's Conviction

~~Acros
campus
1 t
FRIDAY, JULY 30
3 p.m.-The University Players
will present Madge Miller's The
Pied Piper of Hamelin in True-
blood Auditorium.
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Buster Keaton
in "The Navigator" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8 p.m. - Prof. F. B. J. Kuiper
of the University of Leiden will
speak on "The Genesis of a Lin-
guistic Area" in Rackham Aud.
SATURDAY, JULY 31
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. -- Cinema
Guild will present "The Naviga-
tor" featuring Buster Keaton in
the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m. - Michael Robbins,
bass-baritone, will give a degree
recital in the Recital Hall of the
Music School, North Campus.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 1
4:15 p.m.-William Bliem, or-
ganists, will present a degree re-
cital in Hill Aud.
8:30 p~m.-Alexander LeSueur,
flutist, will give a degree Tecital
in the Recital Hall of the Music
School, North Campus.

the National Governors Confer-
ence in Minneapolis.
Halt Protests
The governor called for a halt
to street protests and pledged that
voter rights would be protected
but only through legal avenues.
He said that not a single pro-
test about voter registration or
voting had been received by state
officials.
Negro leaders, who called a 24-
hour suspension of demonstrations
following the slaying about mid-
night Wednesday, said the two
men arrested in the killing had no
connection with the civil rights
movement.
Police Chief Ross M. Chambliss
said that two police officers were
near the scenewhen the shoot-
ing occurred about three blocks
from the courthouse where 250
Negroes had begun a night vigil
protesting the arrest of four Ne-
gro women last week in a whites-
only voting line.
First-degree murder charges
were lodged against Eddie Will
Lamar and Charlie Lee Hopkins,
both of Americus. They were or-
dered held for grand Jury action
at a preliminary hearing before
Justice of the Peace J. W. South-
well.
Grand Jury Reconvened
Judge Emeritus Cleveland Rees
of Superior Court ordered the
grand jury reconvened Monday to
consider the slaying.

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI-The jury-tamp-
ering conviction of International
Teamsters Union President James
R. Hoffa was upheld yesterday by
the Sixth United States Circuit
Court of Appeals.
The unanimous decision, affirm-
ing Hoffa's eight-year prison sen-
tence and $10,000 fine, said there
was no question that efforts had
been made to bribe jurors in an
earlier trial. It said Hoffa "was
the only person who could possi-
bly benefit from the jury-tamper-
ing activities."
, , ,
NEW ORLEANS - A federal
judge convicted the two top police
officials of racially troubled Bo-
galusa of civil contempt yesterday
for ignoring his injunction to pro-
tect civil rights demonstrators.

rookie patrolman guilty of civil
contempt for permitting a barber
to squirt water on two white pick-
ets. The judge had seen movies of
the incident and ordered Patrol-
man Donald Penton brought into
court.

Christenberry
sanctions-jail,
he sees fit.

may make the
fine or both-as

* * *
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson will fly to Mis-
souri today and sign the Medicare
Bill in the presence of former
President Harry S. Truman who
unsuccessfully sponsored similar
legislation 20 years ago.
WASHINGTON--A sharp rise
in food prices forced living costs
up another half-cent on the dollar
in June for the biggest monthly
increase in a year, the government
said yesterday.

Soaring meat prices-as much
as 10.5 per cent-led the over-all 2
per cent hike in food costs to
boost the Labor Department's con-
sumer price index to 110.1, an in-
crease of five-tenths of 1 per cent.
The June increase also rounded
out a 1 per cent hike in the sec-
ond quarter of 1965, the largest
three-month rise since 1957.
. * * *
LONDON-Labor members of
the House of Commons rallied be-
hind Prime Minister Harold Wil-
son last night and defeated a Con-
servative censure motion accusing
his government of failing to hon-
or its election pledges.
With the help of the small Lib-
eral party, the government rolled
up a margin of 21 votes. The tally
was 306 to 285, a larger majority
than the government has scored
on a major vote for weeks.

Chief U.S. Dist.
W. Christenberry

Judge Herbert
also found a

.4b f .,v i:f .,Mrioftl~~'1Y ... ~t ...r. }. """""" 1... :: . r.. : ",",:"..S1":1Sr ' . . . . . ..":

GEORGE WEIN PRESENTS FESTIVAL PRELUDE
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, JULY 30
Day Calendar
Meeting of the Linguistic Societyeof
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
S* s
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with
instruction, Fri., July 30, 8-11 p.m.,
women's Athletic Bldg.
THE NEW
Eatance ORCARPENTER ROAD
Open 7:30-Close 10:00
NOW SHOWING
ALL COLOR PROGRAM
Now the screen blazes
with the story based on
the blistering best-seller!

America-Registration, Rackham Lobby,
8 a.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"The Golden Fish" and "The
Great Rights": Multipurpose Room,
Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
University Players Children's Theatre
Production-Madge Miller's "The Pied
Piper of Hamelin": Trueblood Aud., 3
p.m.
General Notices
Master's Degree Candidates: Candi-
dates for the Master's degree who haxe
not yet picked up their tickets for
the Masters Breakfast may do so be-
fore Fri., Aug. 6, at 5 p.m. Office
hours wiil be 8-12 and 1-5 Monday
through Friday and 8-12 on Sat., July
31. The breakfast will be held on Sun.,
Aug. 8, at 9 a.m. in the Michigan
Union Ballroom.
Doctoral Examination for Michael
Luke Petras, Zoology; thesis: "Poly-
morphisms in Natural Populations of
the House Mouse, Mus musculus,"
Fri., July 30, 2111 Natural Science
Bldg., at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, Morris
Foster.
Lecture:UDaniel Fader, asst. prof. of
English, University of Michigan and
project director, An English Program
for Training Schools, will lecture on
"Reaching the Ujnreached: English in
Every Classroom." on Mon.,Aug.2 at
4 p.m. in Aud. C, Angell Hall. All in-
terested persons are invited to at-
tend.
Doctoral Examination for David Rob-
ert Kassoy, Aeronautical & Astronauti-
cal Engineering; thesis: "Low Reynolds
Number Variable Density Flow Around
a Sphere," Fri., July 30, 1509 E. Engrg.
Bldg., at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, T. C.
Adamson.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Local Engineering Firm-Engrg. As-
Dial 8-6416
Ending Saturday
the
eccentrics - - -
the

sistants. Immed. openings for men and '
women. 1 yr. position. Engrg. bkgd.
helpful. No exper. required.
Hawthorne Center, Northville, Mich.
-Child Care workers for center for
disturbed children. Men or women. BA
Psych., Spec. Educ., recreation, etc.
Exper. with children helpful. Age 21-35.
Citizens Utilities Co., Stamford, Conn.
-Various openings including engrs.
(mech. & elect.), Personnel manager,
auditor, exec. ass't., & accountant. Age
30-40. Degree or study in bus. desirable.
Public utility exper. pref.
City of Grand Rapids, Mich.-Dental
Hygienist for Public Health Dept. De-
gree in dent. hygiene, license or eligi-
ble, and public health agency or dent.
office exper.

Diesel Equipment Div., G.M.C., Grand
Rapids, Mich.-1. Mech. Engr. for prod-
uct engrg. 2. Mech. or Civil Engr. Des.
& layout of systems & processes ex-
per.
Dearborn Public Schools, Mich. -
Budget Accountant. Degree in acctg.
Exper. in schools or municipal acctg.
Knowledge of budget acctg., direction
& control.
Alco Products, Inc., Schenectady, N.Y.
-Foreign & Domestic Service Engrs. to
service diesel engines & diesel-electric
locomotives. Mech., Elect., or Gen. En-
gineering degree. Exper. desirable.
* * *

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HAVE A DATE EVERY
SATURDAY NIGHT
You'll finally be able to afford to, if you get
a Honda.
Trade in your gas-eater for a thrifty Honda
50. Up to 200 miles per gallon, and at least
that many laughs. Maybe more.
Hondas are just the ticket for campus traffic
and campus parking, and you'll notice a big
difference in your pocketbook, too. It'll
bulge for a change.
And so will your date book.

!'mss =' - ='r'.. '. .. "'_

_F"J -'eYiont ttn Modern eooigj

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She gave men a taste of life that made them bunger for more!

JOSEPH E. LEVINE i
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