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July 29, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-07-29

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THURSDAY, JULY 29, 1:865

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 29, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'Johnson Appoints Fortas

Supreme

Court

Justice

Chan cellor
SNamed as

Vo 0ie Head
Replaces Goldberg,
Defended Gideon
By The Associated Prese
President Lyndon B. Johnson
named Abe Fortas to the Supreme
Court and John Chancellor as the
new head of Voice of America
yesterday.
The 55-year-old Fortas, an as-
sociate of Johnson since new deal
days of the 1930s, will succeed
Arthur J. Goldberg, who left the
high court to replace the late
Adlai E. Stevenson as Ambassador
0 to the United Nations.
Fortas
Johnson announced his first
nomination to the high court at
a news conference two days after
Fortas was quoted as saying he
wanted no government, "from
President on down."
t The President said Fortas had
told him "on numerous occasions
in the last 20 months that he
would not be an applicant or a
candidate, or would not accept
appointment to any office."
"This is as it should be, for in
this instance the job has sought
the man," Johnson said. "Mr. For-
tas agrees that the duty and the
opportunity of service on the high-
est court of this great country is
not a call that .any citizen can
reject."
First Choice
Declaring Fortas "was my first
choice" for the court vacancy-
indicating he had trouble per-
suading him to take even that
appointment-Johnson described
hiM in these words:
"One of this nation's most able
and most respected, and most out-
* standing citizens - a scholar, a
profound thinker, a lawyer of su-
perior ability, and a man of hu-
mane and deeply compassionate
feelings toward his fellowman-a
champion of our liberties."
Several members of the Senate
judiciary committee which will
consider the nomination Aug. 5
predicted he would be confirmed
without any difficulty. The court
is now in recess but Fortas could
be sworn into service without
waiting for the new term to start
Oct. 4.
Jewish
Fortas, a balding man of med-
ium build, will continue the un-
declared custom of a Jew sitting
on the court. The seat he takes,

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON appointed Washington lawyer Abe Fortas, right, to the Supreme
Court and NBC newsman John Chancellor, left, to be the new head of the Voice of America.

was occupied by three Jews before
him-Justices Goldberg, Felix
Frankfurter and Benjamin N.
Cardozo.
The Supreme Court will be f a-
miliar ground to Fortas, who has
argued many cases there; Although
he is not a criminal lawyer, his
most notable victories there in-
volved criminal decisions, which
he won as court-appointed attorn-
ey.
One was the Monte Durham
case. It established a rule that an
accused is not responsible if his
crime is the product of a mental
disease or defect.
Gideon
The other was the 1963 Earl
Gideon case. It established a rule
that a person accused of a felony
must be provided with a lawyer
whether he can afford one or not.
Fortas will be- serving with a
former superior, Justice William
O. Douglas. After graduating from
Yale Law School in 1933, he was
assistant professor there under
Douglas. He also was assistant
director of the public utilities di-
vision when Douglas later headed
the Securities and Exchange Com-
mission.
One of his first occasions to
help Johnson was in winning a
court fight in 1948 that threatened
Johnson's effort to move from
the House to the Senate seat.
From then on, Fortas performed
chores for Johnson when he be-
came Senate Democratic leader,

Vice President and finally Presi-
dent.
Behind-the-Scenes
But largely, it has been quiet,
behind-the-scenes activity.
He was seen often with Johnson
conferring on the problems facing
the President after Johnson took
over following President John F.
Kennedy's assassination.
When the morals arrests of
White House aid Walter Jenkins
came to light last year it was
Fortas whom Johnson called on to
help handle the problems involved.
Fortas, like Johnson, worked his
way through college. He did so
partly by playing his violin at
parties and dances.
College
He attended Southwestern Col-
lege "in Memphis and then Yale
Law School. He was editor-in-
chief of the Yale Law Journal and
was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
He began government work in the
legal division of the Agricultural
Adjustment, Administration. His
highest job on the federal payroll
was as Undersecretary of the In-
terior from 1942 to 1946.
He has served on various gov-
ernment committees and is a
director of several corporations.
Chancellor
A Chicago native and 15-year
veteran with the National Broad-
casting Co., Chancellor succeeds
Henry Loomis in the $24,500-a-
year Voice of America post.
Loomis, a physicist and adminis-
trator, left for another government

IDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-'
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, JULY 29
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Pacific 231, Toccato for Toy
Trains" and "Persistent Seel": Multi-
purpose Room, Undergraduate Library,
1:30 p.m.
t University Players Children's Theatre
Production-Madge Miller's "The Pied
Piper of Hamelir": Trueblood Aud., 3
p.m.
Institute of Science and Technologyj
Lecture-F. C. Steward, "The Culture
of Tisues and Free Plant Cells: Impli-

cations for Morphogenesis": Aud. E, Transcendentialism: Conflict and Af-
Physics-Astronomy, 4 p.m. finity," Thurs., July 29, 2601 Haven
Hall, at 3 p.m. Chairman, C. R. O'Don-
Linguistics Institute Forum Lecture nell.
-Yakov, Malkiel, University of Cali-
fornia, Berkeley, "Two Semantic In-
gredients in Etymological Analysis": PlaCemen
Rackham Lecture Hall, 7:30 p.m.
POSITION OPENINGS:
1 Tennessee Valley Authority-Nuclear
General Notices Dev. Engr. for power research staff lo-
cated at Chattanooga. MS nuclear en-
Regents 'Meeting: Sept. 24. Communi- gineering pref. Will consider BS engrg
cations for consideration at this meet- or phys. sci plus 18 mos. exper, in
ing must be in the President's hands nuclear work.
no later than Sept. 10. Northville State Hospital, Mich. -
Child Care Workers. Immed. openings
Doctoral Examination for Eileen Du- for men & women grads. Bkgd. in
one Gambrill, Social Work & Psychol- educ. or soc. sciences. 56 hrs. in child
ogy; thesis: "Effectiveness of the Coun- care or related required.
terconditioning Procedure in Eliminat- Parker Pen Co., Janesville, Wis.-Re-
ing Avoidance Behavior," Thurs., July search Scientist-Metallurgy. BS Metal.
29, 3419 Mason Hall, at 2 p.m. Chair- or metal, engrg. Recent grad or max.
man, D. J. Birch. 3 yrs, exper.
Midwest Mfr.-Various openings for
Doctoral Examination for Aryeh Sam- BSME grads including 1. Field Sales-
uel Routtenberg, Psychology; thesis: man, knowl. of gas industry. Exper.
"Certain Effects of Stimulation in in selling gas meters desirable. 2. Field
Septal Area and Hypothalamus," Thurs., Salesman for industrial machinery.
July 29, 3419 Mason Hall, at 10 a.m. Tech. products sales exper. 3. Applic.
Chairman, James Olds. Engr., up to 3 yrs. exper.
Doctoral Examination for Ottavio For further information, please call
Mark Casale, English Language & Lit- 764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
erature; thesis: "Edgar Allan Poe and pointments, 3200 SAB.

job last March after seven years
with the Voice.
The $30-million-a-year opera-
tion is the radio arm of the U.S.
Information Agency, the govern-
ment's overseas propaganda serv-
ice.
The USIA leadership is under-
going a change with the resigna-
tion of newsmen Carl Rowan as
director 'and of Donald M. Wil-
son as his deputy to return to jour-
nalism.
Governors
Back War
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (P)-The
National Governors Conference
went on record yesterday, with
two dissenting Republican voices,
endorsing President Johnson's ex-
pansion of U.S. military strength
in South Viet Nam.
GOP governors Romney of
Michigan and Mark O. Hatfield of
Oregon voted "no" on a motion
of Gov. Carl E. Sanders, Georgia
Democrat, to support the Presi-
dent's position, immediately after
Johnson's televised report to the
nation on decisions he has made
in regard to Viet Nam.
The Sanders motion put the
governors on record supporting the
President's position and the prin-
ciples he enunciated at his tele-
vised news conference today.
But there were some Republican
complaints that the President still
had not furnished sufficient de-
tails, as well as expressed hopes
that he will be much more spe-
cific in a scheduled White House
conference with the state execu-
tives today.
Romney complained he had
heard nothing in the President's
television presentation that he
hadn't known before.
Gov. William W. Scranton of
Pennsylvania, a Republican, said
he is sure the great majority of
Americans support the President.
Romney tried to get the con-
ference to postpone action until
after the governors receive a
White House briefing from the
President today.
AcrOss
THURSDAY, JULY 29
1:30 p.m. - The Audio-Visual
Education Center will show the
films "Pacific 231," "Toccata for
Toy Trains" and "Persistent Seed"
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI.
3 p.m.-The University Players'
Children Theatre Production,
Madge Miller's "The Pied Piper of
Hamelin," will be presented in
Trueblood Aud.
4 p.m.-F. C. Steward will lec-
ture on "The Culture of Tissues
and Free Plant Cells: Implications
for Morphogenesis" in Aud. E,
Physics-Astronomy bldg.
7:34, p.m.-Yakov Malkiel of the
University of California at Berke-
ley will speak on "Two Semantic
Ingredients in Etymological Anal-
ysis" at Rackham.
FRIDAY, JULY 30
3 p.m.-The University Players
will present Madge Miller's The
Pied Piper of Hamelin in True-
blood Auditorium.
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Buster Keaton
in "The Navigator" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8 p.m. - Prof. F. B. J. Kuiper

U.S. Planes
Hlit North
Viet Troops
SAIGON, Viet Nam (P-A half
dozen U.S. Navy pilots shot up an
army unit in North Viet Nam
yesterday to protect a fallen fly-
ing mate until he could be pluck-,
ed to safety by helicopter.
The action, 65 miles north of
the border, was the first announc-
ed aerial strike at North Viet
Nam's troops, though its military
installations have been hit off,
and on for more than five months.
U.S. spokesmen told of the res-
cue operation and some details of
another first, the fighter-bomber
strike Tuesday that pilots said
destroyed one surface-to-air mis-
sile site and damaged another 40
miles northwest of Hanoi.
Offensive
At the same time U.S. and Viet-
namese marines pressed a joint of-
fensive against the Viet Cong in
the Duc An area 60 miles south
of Da Nang. They shot their
slowly eastward from an inland
helicopter landing zone toward the
sea.
The American leathernecks kill-
ed 12 Viet Cong and captured
three wounded before digging in
for the night near Duc An. The
Vietnamese Marines counted five
dead guerrillas. Casualties among
the attackers were officially des-
cribed as light. Though it was
estimated three Viet Cong bat-
talions, perhaps 1,200 men, were
in the area, the enemy seemed
content with a rear guard action.
Drives
Vietnamese troops staged two
drives south of Saigon, one 35
miles away and the other 75 miles
from the capital.
A U.S. spokesman said 29 Viet
Cong were killed and 14 men were
rounded up in one operation and
the other uncovered a weapons
cache that included 20 Russian-
made grenade launchers and 118
boxes of TNT. He said government
casualties were light.
U.S. and Vietnamese planes and
U.S. armed helicopters staged fur-
ther raids on suspected guerrilla
holdings. Forward observers es-
timated the aircraft killed 300
Viet Cong in scattered areas. This
was not confirmed, however, by
body count.
A U.S. spokesman also disclosed
that six planes, in all, were lost
in the raids on North Viet Nam
bases Tuesday.
That matched a figure radio
Hanoi announced at the time.
Subsequently, however, the North
Vietnamese station declared eight
were downed that day.
Missile Sites
The official report here was
that three of the 46 F105 fighter-
bombers involved in the strike
against the missile sites were shot
down by conventional ground fire
and two others crashed after col-
liding near their home base on
the return flight. One pilot was
rescued. The others were pre-
sumed dead or captured.
Another F105 was shot down in
a raid that day against the Cam
Doi barracks, 30 miles west-
northwest of Hanoi. A spokesman
said it was felled by conventional
antiaircraft fire and the pilot was
presumed killed. No parachute was
observed.
Maj. Gen. Gilbert L. Meyers,
deputy commander of the U.S. air
force 2nd air division, told a news
conference that high-altitude mis-
siles may be set up in North Viet
Nam outside the seven known pre-
pared sites. He said there may be
mobile units in many other places.
The missiles presumably can be

j operated from trucks.

began 30 years ago by approving a
the social security system to pro-
vide a new health care program
for the 19 million Americans over
65. The vote was 70 to 24.
* * *
ATHENS, Greece - Bolstered
by new support from center union
deputies, Premier George Athan-
asiadis Novas announced early
yesterday he would ask parliament
for a vote of confidence Friday.
He said he was sure he would
get full support. Earlier, Anthan-
asiadis Novas had been expected
to postpone the vote.
CLEVELAND, Ohio--Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. went from poor
neighborhoods to a wealthy suburb
yesterday, urging Negroes to vote
and whites to follow a path of
brotherhood.
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - W.
Averell Harriman, President John-
son's roving ambassador, yesterday
conferred with President Tito. It
was learned that Viet Nam was
the topic in the two hours of
talks.
S* * *
ANKARA, Turkey-An uniden-
tified plane dropped four bombs
on a town on the Turkish-Iraqi
border yesterday, killing one per-
son and wounding four others, a
Turkish army general staff head-
quarters spokesman said.'
* * *
SANTO DOMINGO-The Or-
ganization of American States is
once again preparing to pay the
multi-million-dollar Dominican
government payroll, apparently
with U.S. funds.

world NewsR
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.-U.S. Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg
laid before U.S. Secretary-General U Thant yesterday a new bid for
Viet Nam peace talks and stressed again the readiness of the United
States to ,enter into negotiations without conditions.
Taking up his new post as successor to the late Adlai E.
Stevenson, Goldberg handed the Secretary-General a letter from
President Johnson asking Thant to continue his Viet Nam peace
efforts.
WASHINGTON-The Senate climaxed yesterday a fight that

By FRANK CORMIER
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON W.) - President
Johnson's decision against any
immediate call-up of reservists
and national guard units to bol-
ster the U.S. commitment in South
Viet Nam apparently was in-
fluenced, in good measure, by the
surprise discovery of mobile sur-
face-to-air missiles in North Viet
Nam.
Before one of these missile in-
stallations shot down an Ameri-
can fighter bomber last weekend,
Johnson seemingly was preparing
to ask Congress to authorize a
mustering of reservists-a step
suggesting a national emergency
-in order to demonstrate U.S.
determination to the Communists.
However, it was understood he
decided the sudden opportunity to

Missiles Explain Draft Ct

make air strikes yesterday against
two missile installations would be
testimony enough to this coun-
try's resolve-avoiding, at the
same time, the unpleasantness
that would have resulted from a !
mustering of reservists.
Missile Sites
Defense sources said photo in-
terpreters in Saigon failed to spot
evidence of the two newest anti-
aircraft missile sites when they
studied reconnaissance photos last.
week.
The presence of the sites was
detected here last Saturday when
the photographs were flown in
from Viet Nam and examined with
more complex and sophisticated
photo interpretation equipment,
the sources said.
The photos which first showed
evidence of the two sites were
examined in Saigon on July 20.

Dial 662

ARTHUR GOLDBERG
THE NEW
Enda4..n.CARPENTER ROD
Open 7:30-Close 10:00
NOW SHOWING
ALL COLOR PROGRAM
Now the screen blazes
with the story based on
the blistering best-seller 1

..r

ENDS SAT

Shows at 1 :
5 :00-7 :00
More fur
barrel of tE

They reached W
Saturday, the day t
lost during an at
west of Hanoi.
Draft C
In practical tei
newly announced
double draft calls
men to the Ame
South Viet Nam v
least at this point,
would have been
quick mustering o
At the same tim
able to avoid the
course-which wo
hometowners all a
-and, likewise, we
closed in great m
portunities for futu
diplomatic initiati
negotiated settleme
High administr
pointed out, too, t
the colors for rf
have entailed long
the troops involv
been put on the g
Viet Nam.
Seasoned
By assigning sea
Southeast Asia and
filling the manpow
added draftees, Ji
words of govern
still will quickly ge
Nam all the force
quired.
It was understo
backstop precautio
are underway to r
some reserve units
equipment so that,
mobilized later, th
position to movi
quickly to the scer
Meet Requi
Officials said th
nounced by Johns
conference will m
requirements in S
and all those now
Even these lim
cost money, howe
cials said the S
would be asked to
billion and $2 bil
fense appropriatio
fiscal year that b
order to pay the
next six months or
additional supplem
ation is in prospec
tion early next yet
settlement is not
interim.

--

l

DIAL 5-6290

conference bill that would expandI

PAGE THREE
all
ashington last
he U.S. jet was
ttack 40 miles
rms, Johnson's
Idecision to;H
and add 50,000
rican force in
will achieve, at
everything that
entailed in a
f reserve units.
e, Johnson was
more dramatic
uld have hit
tcross the land
ould have fore-
easure his op-
re political and
ves aimed at a
nt.
'ation officials
hat any call to
eservists would
g delays before
ed could have
round in South
Units
asoned units to
* simultaneously
er pipeline with
ohnson, in the
ment officials,
t to South Viet
s currently re-
od that, as a
n, steps already
provide at least
with the latest"
should they be
ey will be in a
e much more
ae of conflict.
rements
e measures an-
on at his news
,eet all present
outh Viet Nam
foreseeable.
ited steps will
ver. High offi-
enate probably
add between $
lion to the de-
n for the 1966
egan July 1 fin
bills for the
more. Then an
iental appropri-
t, for presenta-
ar, if a peaceful
reached in the
-6264
URDAY
00-3:00
Fr 9:05
n than a
men-agerst

AY
Carroll
Baker
SPRDTON
me U'HEATT

JOSEPH E. LEVINE
EiCHNIOLOWSPANAVlSI
~A PARAMOLT CUC
PLUS

SUND

Campus

" iawtw iw w*ia w w w~w I
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...SELDOM SHOWN SILENT'
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CLASSIC COMEDY !
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. THE NAVIGATOR!
starring
I I
I BUSTER KEATON!
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SHORT: KEYSTONE HOTEL
I UU
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ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
** *
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, To-
night at 7:30, at Hillel, 1429 Hill St.,
Prof. Arthur G. Hansen and Dr. Eric
R. Krystall in a "dialogue," "Tuskegee:
The Deep South Speaks with Michi-
gan."
Christian Science Organization, Reg-
ular testimony meeting, Thurs., July 29,
7:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with
instruction, Fri., July 30, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.

of the University of Leiden will
speak on "The Genesis of a Lin-
guistic Area" in Rackham Aud.
SATURDAY, JULY 31
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present "The Naviga-
tor" featuring Buster Keaton in
the Architecture Aud.
Dial 8-6416
Ending Saturday
the
eccentrics - - -
the
anguished -- -
the confused
taking off - - -
MarshalI
Naify
Presents

M-G-M AND Fl.MWAYSsPRESENT
EUZABETH TAYLOR
RICHARD BURTON
EVA MARIE SAINT
IN MARTIN RANSOHOFF'S
PRODUCTION
ANADUT OE -
#4 PANAVISION'ANDMETROCOLOR
NEXT
"LORD J I M"

Mitchum
f HE FRANK ROSS
PANAYIStlK' cTNICOt1R'

-ALSO CARTOONS

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a NWAO k BN u m "" -.OF 0 A.1 09 I

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