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May 08, 1965 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-08

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SATURDAY, MAY 8, x.965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAVIR TVU

I' '

L. SATURDAY, MAY 8,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAIlY U~ A fiI~' ~'WV *suq.ua~~ ~AVZl

iIlkM riva

CONSERVATIVES MEET:
Third Party To Ban Liberals

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 10:00 'til 11:30 A.M.

By ROGER RAPOPORT
Special To The Daily
CHICAGO-About 600 conserva-
tive Americans representing 20
conservative groups ranging from
the John Birsh Society to the
Christian Anti-Communism cru-
sade formed a "National Anti-
Communist Party" here last week.
The new party was rormed, as
one delegate explained, "because
of the failure of the Goldwater
forces to purge the Republican
party of liberals." Coming from
every part of the nation, the dele-
gates adhered to the words of
a orange bumber sticker being sold
at the convention which exclaim-
ed, "27 million Americans can't be
wrong."
THE AMERICAN Opinion Book-
store offered the widest variety
of merchandise. There were rec-
ords by Revilo P. Oliver, "Support
Your Local Police" decals, and a
phamplet by Ed Janish entitled
"What We Must Know About the
Overstreets." A new "constitution
kgame" called "Allegiance" was
also on sale. Bookstore manager
Mrs. Roger Mossion of Glenview
explained that "'McGuffy's Sec-
ond Eclectic Reader' was selling
quite well, because many parents
find it more interesting and bet-
ter for their children than 'Dick
and Jane.'
Mrs. Evelyn E. Jenks explained
the need for a third party. "We've
got to have a choice. Personally I
would like to have Governor Wal-
lace for president. He's a good
man and he's interested in
America. I was for Goldwater last
summer, but I remember many
people at the San Francisco con-
vention wanted Wallace."
But a man from Chappaqua dis-
agreed. "I think we should have
General Walker for president and
Lester Maddox for vice-president."
K e n t Courtney, convention
chairman and publisher of the
' conservative monthly, "Independ-
ent American," had called the
convention together under the
auspices of the "Conservative So-
ciety of America." Courtney
speaking at a banquet began: "As
Dean Clarence Manion (Mutual
radio commentator) once said,
America can not fly on two left
wings:"
Then he began reading the new
party platform: "God created peo-
ple, people created the States, the
States created the federal govern-
ment, and God, not government is
the rightful Master of the people.
We rededicate ourselves, with

GEN. EDWIN WALKER
Charity, to the divinely inspired
Ten Commandments and the Ser-
mon on the Mount. . . . We recall
with rising hope that in Novem-
ber of 1964, 27 million Americans
would not be seduced or intimi-
dated by power, but voted the con-
science of a Conservative-thus, in
effect, constituting themselves a
reserve army of freedom, and in
view of subsequent political capi-
tulations, a virtual committee of
27 million for the formation of a
new national party-the largest
u n 1e d articulate minority in
America."
THE APPROVING roar of the
audience forced him to wait a full
inute before going on into the
16 point platform of the new
party, which included such ideas
as "withdrawing from all world
government organizations, break-
ing relations with all Communist
governments, restricting immigra-
tions, and ending the news man-
agement syndicate of big press,
big government and big labor."
Positive foreign policy ideas in-
cluded a new plan to liberate Cuba
by "capturing Chinese and Rus-
sian Communists based on Cuba
and holding them as. hostages
pending release of Cuba from
Russia and Red China." The per-
manent solution to "Communist
aggression in Southeast Asia is
the establishment of free govern-
ment on the mainland."
The platform called for an ad-
vance committee to lay the
groundwork for the new party.
The committee. will organize state
parties, which will in turn call a

ROBERT WELCH

new national convention where
the party will be officially named.
The advance committee "shall be
completely democratic." It will
have no chairman, just a secre-
tary and treasurer. After unani-
mous approval of the new plan,
Courtney asked General Walker
to say a few words.
The General s a i d sternly,
"Ladies and gentlemen many peo-
ple have asked me if this new
party we are forming is the third
party in the United States. Well
I'll tell you this, we do not have
a party in America today, we only
have a dictatorship. Our party is
not the third party in America but
the first party."
THE GENERAL then gave the
rostrum to J. Bracken Lee, former
governor of Utah and the incum-
bent mayor of Salt Lake City. Lee,
who has long spearheaded a drive
to abolish the personal income tax,
told of his deep regard for General
Walker. "The Communists would
like to have people like General
Walker."
The vehement applause for this
assertion suddenly turned into a
chorus of boos a few moments
later when Lee said, "I don't ad-
vocate calling your enemies names,
I think there's a better way, after
sensing he had antagonized his
audience, Lee quickly added, "But
if you want to call people names
go ahead."
The speaker also remarked, "A
lot of people think there is some-
thing wrong with us. They imply
you have to be crazy to believe as
we do." Lee's remark reminded a

few in the audience of what Rob-
ert Welch had said in his speech,
"A Touch of Sanity," The John
Birch Society president had said,
"Not only is the country one vast
insane asylum, they've let out the
worst patients to run the place."
AFTER LEE'S speech and the
benediction, the convention ad-
journed. The delegates were jubi-
lant. A man from Azusa, Calif.,
told his wife, "This is the end of
the Republican Party. Now that
we're pulling out they'll be noth-
ing left but thesshell."
The delegates were also en-
gaged in a bit of last minute shop-
talk. One man told a friend how
to put pressure on the local news-
paper. "You go through the paper
and make a list of the advertisers.
Call them up, explain the cause
and get them on the editor's back.
It really works. Our paper used
to be as left as you can get, but
it's not that way any more."
There were hurried goodbyes as
well. John G. Foyer of Indianapo-
lis told a departing friend, "Well
at least you know where I stand,
and I won't be changing."
General Walker who had told a
press conference earlier, "I bet
there are more good Americans in
the Ku Klux Klan than the
Americans for Democratic Action,"
also had a few words for a college
reporter. "The press just gets to-
gether up there with U Thant and
the State Department to just try
and shape a myth. They're trying
to tell us that China is the num-
ber one threat to America. Did you
see there in the Gallup Poll where
they said that 57 per cent think
that China is the enemy? I don't
trust that for one minute. China
isn't the enemy. We blasted their
planes right out of the sky in
Viet Nam."
GENERAL WALKER continued,
"You know who the real enemy is.
It's the Communists right at
home. What we need in this coun-
try is a new state department.
And those Communists and left
wingers, they are at the schools,
Berkeley, Southern Methodist Un-
iversity and Texas. There's no use
of a kid going to school with all
those left wing professors who are
living off public funds but have
never worked a day in their lives.
It would be better for the kids to
go to work than to go to school
and listen to all those left wing
professors who should go out and
get a job and work for a living."

FOR RENT
ROOM IN large, quiet, private home
with refrig., linens turn. $11 per week.
NO 2-9806 after 5:30 p.m. 7
NEAR CAMPUS on Greenwood St. - I
double room and 1 suite for men.
Avail. summer and/or fall. Kitchen
privileges. Call 663-8244 evenings or
weekends. C
NO LEASE REQUIRED
Large studio, unfurn., $70/mo., in-
cludes all utilities. Unfurn. 1 bdrm.
apt., $95/mo., all utilities. 663-7268.
3 RM. FURN. APT. Close to campus and
downtown. Mod., clean, garage,
laundry facilities, TV antenna, large
sun porch, utilities except electricity,
$145 mo. NO 3-5532 after 6 p.m. C8
ATTRACTIVE, 2 bdrm., large furn.
apt. Piano, garage. Near campus.
Heat, water included. Grad women
students, married couples preferred.
$150 mo. Call NO 5-4740 or see 1523
S. Univ. C5
HOUSE FOR RENT-3 bdrm., minutes
from campus. Rent $200 or best bid.
Call 662-7384. C9
CLOSE TO CAMPUS and downtown,
avail. after May 15. 2 bdrm. turn.
apt., mod, and clean, off-street park-
ing, laundry facilities, TV antenna,
utilities except electricity. $135 mo.
NO 3-5532 after 6 p.m. C10
REDUCED
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL
1 bdrm. apt. with study. Very attrac-
tive, modern turn. Avail, now and
fall. $80 mo. Call NO 5-0925 or NO
2-7992. C3
ATTRACTIVE studio apt. for grad.
woman, private bath, 1st floor. $75.
NO 3-8838. C11
4-MAN APARTMENT
Modern, furnished 4-man apartment
available now for either part of sum-
mer, whole summer, or full year.
Good location, off-street parking,
garbage disposal, full basement in
addition to kitchen. $31.25 per man
during summer. $37.50 during school
year. Call Ed, 662-1860, 5:30-7 p.m.
C12
ROOMS FOR MEN
$20 per month
TV Lounge, Air conditioned
Complete Snack Kitchen
Call 8-9593
Cl
FURN 3 bdrm house, ceramic bath,
fireplace, newly decorated. Hill-
Division area. Summer $180 mo. Fall
$220 mo. Call NO 3-6528. C3
418 E. WASH INGTON
WASHINGTON
MANOR
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL, 1965
ONE BEDROOM & STUDIO APART-
MENTS, LUXURIOUSLY FURNISHED,
AIR - CONDITIONED, BALCONIES,
SOUND-PROOF CONSTRUCTION,
FOR APPOINTMENT
CALL NO 8-6906
C6
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to mid-New York
State. Weekend of May 14. 662-9881.
NEW CARS
EUROPEAN CARS, INC.
NEW CARS AND SERVICE
506 E. Michigan, Ypsilanti
HU 2-2175
Washtenaw County's only
authorized V.W. Dealer
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI'S Galore!
LEVI'S SLIM-F ITS-$4.25
"White," and 5 Colors
For "Guys and Gals"
Cord. SLIM-FITS-$5.98
LEVI'S STA-PREST PANTS

Never Needs Ironing
Asst'd. Colors-$6.98

ROOM AND BOARD
CO-OPS are a good place to eat this
summer. Board $11 per wk.rRoom
& board $17 per week. Join for 1 or
both terms. Contact Intter-Cooper-
ative Council, 2546 SAB. Call 668--
6872. El
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Stereo tape recorder, Sony
model 300, excel. cond. Call T. Gonalis
at 764-5159 afternoons and evenings.
Bi
MEN'S BIKE, excel. cond. $22 or best
offer. Call Al Siebert at 764-9152 days
or 662-6145 eves. B2
21-INCH Console TV. Admiral. Good
condition. Call 665-7056. B3
BUY AND SELL THROUGH
The Clearing HouseF
A listing service for privately
owned articles.
Autos, motorcycles, bikes, T.V., F
Hi-Fi's, furniture, cameras, etc.
PHONE 662-6574, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

2
3
4

.70
.85
1.00

LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 2:30 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone 764-0557

PERSONAL
HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY from your
long-lost child. F8
HI TO Andy. Jim, and Jim, Hi to Ken
and Ken and Stan--Gee whiz you
guys, it's beginningto sound like
the Mouseketeer role-call. F6

BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA NOW! Buy, reserve, or lay-
away before the spring rush. 24 hr.
delivery on all 12 popular 1965 mod-
els. 30 or more to choose from. See
them at HONDA OF ANN ARBOR,
1906 Packard Rd., 665-9281. Z
SEE IT NOW-The '65 Yamaha with
the revolutionary new oil injection
system. No more fuss or muss.
NICHOLSON MOTOR SALES
223 S. First
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
RENT A TRUCK
Pickups, panels, stakes, and vans.
59 Ecorse Rd., Ypsilanti, Mich.
USED CARS
1955 PLYMOUTH, $50. Call 665-0386
between 6 and 10. N6
'61 VW, GOOD cond. Recent valve and
ringe job. 663-3171 evenings. N5
TR3, 1959 ROADSTER, Red w/white top.
Tunnel cover, Michelin X tires, very
good cond. Highest offer. 662-6111. N4
TRIUMPH TR-4, 1964 roadster. Clean.
14.500 miles. Never raced. Four on
the floor, wire wheels, radio, heater,
windshield washer. Green, black
top. Racing stripes, seat belts. One
owner. $2500. Can be seen at 523
Neff Road, Grosse Point. Call TU
2-8535 for appointment. N3
ALPHA-1963 Sprint Speciale. One own-
er. Mint condition. Best offer. 3150
Morgan Road. NI
MGB 1964
AM-FM radio. NO 5-4620. N7
MGB '63. Blue Roadster, wire wheels,
luggage rack, radio. 665-5620. N8
'59 OLDS, 4 door station wagon. Call
NO 3-3547. N2
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS, AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

1.95
2.40
2.85

RENT YOUR TV from NEJAC
GE and Zenith portables for only
per month. FREE service and
livery, Phone 662-5671 NOW.

5 DAYS
3.00
3.75
4.35

$10
de-

WAKE UP SERVICE - Have your
phone ring at any designated time-
day or night-LOW RATES, DON'T
BE LATE FOR CLASS OR WORK-
AGAIN. TELEPHONE ANSWERING
SERVICE, 665-8871 (24 hours). F42
AUSTIN DIAMOND--"The best buy on
an Engagement ring in Ann Arbor."
1209 S. University, 663-7151.
SEE MARK RICHMAN Prestige Party
Favors for the most unusual line of
party favors ever assembled by one
company. Office and Show Room at
1103 S. University. NO 2-6362. F
FOR THE FINEST in Dance Music-It's
Johnny Harberd
Art Bartner
Ray Louis
Maximillian
Peter Clements
Wadye Gallant
Contact The Bud-Mor Agency
1103 S. University
NO 2-6362

HELP WANTED
PART TIME-Young woman to work at
Univ. Hospital about 1 hr. daily.
Ideal for someone living in Univ.
Terrace or vicinity. Do not phone
Hosp. Please write time of day avail.
and describe any previous work ex-
perience to Box No. 7, 420 Maynard,
Ann Arbor. H5
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive; $7 and $10 for Rh
negative. Hours: Mon., 9-4; Tues.,
9-4; Fri., 1-7, 18-21 yrs. old need
parent's permission. Detroit Blood
Service, new location, 404 W. Mich-
igan, Ypsilanti, Mich. H29
STUDENTS--Choose your own hoursI
Scholarship offered1 Cali 761-27''9
8-11 a.m. H7
SUMMER SUBLET
SUMMER SUBLET-2 blks. from cam-
pus. Furn. for 2, until Aug. 19. Call
665-5582 after 5:00. U8
NEED THIRD girl for spring half.
Across from IM Bldg., bi-level, air-
conditioned. Call 663-2253. U6
MOD. FURN. apt. for 4-Air-cond. Heat-
ed swimming pool. Call 761-2283. U9
REDUCED FOR THE SUMMER
Furnished and unfurnished for 1-4
people. Call 663-7268. U7
SWIMMING POOL-2 blks. from cam-
pus. 4-man, 2-bdrm. Rent negotiable.
Call NO 3-6432. U10
725 HAVEN, 2-3 man furn. apt. Wall-
to-wall carpeting, disposal, prkng.
Will bargain. Call 761-0434. U2
WANTED--2 girls to share luxury apt.
Close to campus. Cali 665-2805 after
6:00. U4
2ND SESSION, for 2, 3 or 4, new air
cond. apt. Bargain summer rates,
Call 668-8723, 665-8330 or 665-2689. U3
2 GIRLS to complete 4 man apt:, air-
con'd., swimming pool, lounge, ne-
gotiable. Call 761-0776. U3
MALE ROOMATE for air con'd. apt.
Call 2-1477 evenings. U2
SUMMER SUBLET: Air-con'd., 1 bdrm
apt. June 20-Aug. 20. $100-$125/mo.
Purcell, 247A Bay, Santa Monica, Cal.

Meet the Right Person
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of personality
appraisal and an IBM system, is to
introduce unmarried persons to others
with compatible backgrounds, inter-
ests and ideals. Interviews by ap-
pointment. Phone 662-4867.
MICHIGAN SCIENTIFIC
INTRODUCTION SERVICE

MISCELLANEOUS

TODAY AND TOMORROW:

TIRED OF those drab, common-place
dorm meals?? Still hungry when you
leave the table? Solve your problem
here-We'll be glad to sell you second
helpings.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
open every night 'til 12

Unilateral Dominican Policy Must End

I PEOPLE to sublease apt. may
Sept. 1. Furn and air cond.
HU 3-6100, ext. 3960.

3 to
Call
US

By WALTER LIPPMANN 'just
prev~
4UR IMMEDIATE NEED in the whe
Dominican affair is to per- for
suade the other American states ernm
to participate in dealing with the If
problem. For there is no denying out
that our intervention was decided it m
upon without prior consultation this
with, much less prior authoriza- whit
tion from, the Organization of be s
American States. Furthermore, it orde
is undeniable that the interven- wer
tion is flatly contrary to Article year
15 of the charter. Procedurally Tb
and legally we are in a bad po- prop
sition. of H
The fact is, however, that in the furt
Dominican Republic the emer- pea
gency was believed to be so acute the
that there was no time for a ever
thorough inquiry before acting Lati
and that neither the charter of been
the OAS nor the existing setup 100
provided the machinery for deal- this
ing with the emergency.
It can be said, as President Juan T
Bosch is saying, that his support- trin
ers were on the verge of winning cony
when President Johnson stepped had
in. But it appeared to President Am
Johnson that Communists trained dat
by Fidel Castro were very near to Bu
seizing control of the Bosch re- Ame
bellion. U.S.
Ame
IF THEY had done so, the situ- und
ation in the Dominican Republic mak
might well have been irreversible. mili
There would then have been no pow
more constitutional elections. F
The United States intervention, was
though it was unilateral and in ion
violation of Article 15, has to be not
'THE GREAT DICTATOR':

ified on the grounds that it
rented an irreversible situation,
reas now the way is still open'
a democratically elected gov-
ment.
the United States is to come
of the affair with clean hands,
nust persuade its neighbors in
hemisphere that the charter,
ch was adopted in 1948, must
upplemented and developed in
er to meet the conditions which
e not known or realized 17
rs ago in 1948.
he charter was based on the
osition that, with the defeat
Hitler in 1945, there was no
her external threat to the
ce of the hemisphere and that
problem was how to end for-
r the U.S. interventions in
n-American affairs which had
n going on for something like
years. Article 15 is directed to
.
HE U.S. AGREED to the doc-
e of the charter, being itself
vinced that the hemisphere
nothing further to protect
erican interests were out of
;e.
ut what neither the Latin-
erican governments nor the
. realized in 1948 was that an
erican republic, Cuba, was to
ergo a revolution that might
ke it, as happened in 1962, a
tary outpost df a foreign
ver.
or this contingency the OAS
not prepared, and public opin-
in the American republics was
prepared. Even before the

Cuban missile crisis of October,
1962-as a matter of fact, as early!
as the autumn of 1961-the Amer-
ican republics have been talking
about the problem.
THE CONFERENCE at Punta1
del Este, Uruguay, was convoked
in December, 1961, in order to
discuss the problem of "the in-
tervention of extracontinental
powers directed toward breaking,
American solidarity."
The fact of the matter is that
the OAS had not carried that dis-
cussion to a point where the or-
ganization was ready to deal with,
the emergency which broke out
last week.
It is this deficiency which needs

to be repaired, and only when it is
repaired will our unilateralism in
the emergency be overcome and
our violation of the letter of an
inadequate treaty be purged.
IT IS, I believe, upon such a
foundation of candor and humil-
ity that we can bring about the
solidarity of the hemisphere. On
our part, candor and humility
compel us to admit that we acted
outside the law because we deemed
it obsolete for the emergency. On
the part of our neighbors, candor
and humility call for a recogni-
tion that the OAS is an under-
developed institction for realizing
the ideal which it proclaims.
(c),1965, The Washington Post Co.

I .. I

/ i

.
. ...
~ {
x.

OVERTURE, CONCERTO:
Mozart Takes First
In Festival Concert

'a '
ix
By solving problems in astronautics, Air Force
scientists expand man's knowledge of the universe. Lt. Howard McKinley, M.A.,
tells about research careers on the Aerospace Team.

HE MAY Festival came up a
notch in its second presenta-
tion last night at Hill Auditorium.
Thor Johnson's leadership pro-
vided the difference. The Phila-
delphia Orchestra lost a little of
its slouch, although it was still
far from enthusiastic. The con-
cert was a Benjamin Britten sand-
wich, flanked by two slices of Mo-
zart. Unfortunately, the filling

'TaIkie '---Impediment for Chaplain

didn't match the bread.
Britten's "Spring Symphony"
proudly presents Nature in Cine-
mascope, a fit background for a
Walt Disney Wonderland. Each
movement is sanitarily wrapped
in polyethylene, professionally
packaged. The sound spectcular
is matched by the visual delight of
a large chorus, huge orchestra and
an overwhelmed children's chorus.
IT SEEMED a shame to import
Janice Harsanyi, Maureen For-
rester and Murray Dickie just to
twitter bird-calls. In general, one
could agree with critics who say,
yes, the symphony orchestra is an
old dinosaur dragging its weary
bones past the point of no return.
Mozart's "Symphonie Concer-
tante" for violin, viola and orches-
tra is one of the great concert of
any era, it received a warm tri-
bute from concertmaster, Anshel
Brusilow, principal violist Joseph
de Pasquale and the orchestra.
The "Symphonie Concertante"
really needs no explanation about
the death of Mozart's mother and
his disappointment in love to

S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI'S
For Gals and Guys
"White" and Colors-$5.98

LEVI'S Supersim's-$4.98
LEVI'S Dungarees-$4.49
TURTLENECKS-$1.69
(15 Colors)
Open Mon. & Fri. Nites
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

At the Cinema Guild
'THE GREAT DICTATOR" is a
most unique film.
It is unique, in the first place,
because it offers strong criticism
-a wartime brand of criticism-
of Adolf Hitler (Adenoid Hynkel
in the movie) two years before
the United States entered World
War II.
Secondly, the criticism of the

LEVI JACKETS
Blue Denim-$5.49
"White"-$5.98

ger man who does not understand
why he and his people should be
persecuted.
In both roles, the best scenes
are silent. Chaplin is in his own
element, and he is still "king of
the screen."
For example, the barber shaves
a customer to the rhythm of a
Hungarian dance; or the storm
troopers chase the Jews in the
ghetto in an almost keystone-

don't want to rule or conquer any-
one, but I should like to help
everyone . ."
This is the Charlie Chaplin, who
had been the favorite of audiences
across the country in the years
previous, trying to use the in-
fluence he still had, or thought he
had, to strike the consciences of
Americans and warn them of Hit-
ler.
But as far as the film is con-

(Lr. McKinley holds degrees in electronics and electri-
cal engineering from the Georgia Institute of Tech-
nology and the Armed Forces Institute of Technology.
He received the 1963 Air Force Research & Devel-
opment Award for his work with inertial guidance
components. Here he answers some frequently-asked
questions about the place of college-trained men and
women in the U.S. Air Force.)
Is Air Force research really advanced, compared to
what others are doing? It certainly is. As a matter of
fact, much of the work being done right now in uni-
versities and industry had its beginnings in Air Force
research and development projects. After all, when
you're involved in the development of guidance sys-
tems for space vehicles-a current Air Force project
in America's space program-you're working on the
frontiers of knowledge.
What areas do Air Force scientists get involved in?
Practically any you can name. Of course the principal

many varied and challenging administrative-manage-
rial positions. Remember, the Air Force is a vast and
complex organization. It takes a great many different
kinds of people to keep it running. But there are two
uniform criteria: you've got to be intelligent, and
you've got to be willing to work hard.
What sort of future do I have in the Air Force? Just
as big as you want to make it. In the Air Force, talent
has a way of coming to the top. It has to be that way,
if we're going to have the best people in the right
places, keeping America strong and free.
What's the best way to start an Air Force career? An
excellent way-the way I started-is through Air Force
Officer Training School. OTS is a three-month course,
given at Lackland Air Force Base, near San Antonio,
Texas, that's open to both men and women. You can
apply when you're within 210 days of graduation, or
after you've received your degree.

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